REVIEW

Ant-Man and the Wasp

Marvel Cinematic Universe

OR (The Secret Life of Ants)

Author

Kevin Sebastian




WORDICT

A-Okay






ELITE METER
0
%








BYTE THE BULLET

A fun little addition to Marvel's universe, even if it's not memorable.


Kevin Sebastian

July 7, 2018

Plot

Scott Lang is living the simple life, trying to be a good citizen while he waits out the last of his house arrest. Between avoiding trouble, trying to be father-of-the-year, and starting a new company, Lang seems to have it all covered. Or does he?


2018 seems to be an uncannily important year for the Marvel Cinematic Universe—a decade of its movies later, the studio wants its people to know that it's gearing a significant arc up for closure. It's why Ant-Man and the Wasp, a film that takes place before the events of Avengers: Infinity War, feels like such an outlier. Peyton Reed's direct sequel to his 2015 superhero comedy is a palette-cleansing filler of sorts that's designed purely to make you forget a specific purple Titan's finger-snapping chaos—to a point.

Super-romance

(L-R) Evangeline Lily and Paul Rudd star in Peyton Reed''s Ant-Man and the Wasp, a Marvel Studios and Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures release.

In a way, the film is more about family and interpersonal relationships, with a lot of hit-and-miss humor thrown in the middle. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas; The Game, 1997) debates the chances of bringing his wife back after Ant-Man's successful subatomic roundtrip in the last film. His daughter (Evangeline Lily; Real Steel, 2013) gets ready to become the newest Wasp, and then there's Scott Lang (Paul Rudd, NBC’s Friends) trapped in house-arrest as a consequence of turning on the Sokovia Accords we've seen established in Captain America: Civil War.
[Ant-Man is] trying to be a good dad, a good boss, and a law-abiding (?) citizen.
As the title hints, Ant-Man and the Wasp is—in reality—more about the Wasp than Ant-Man himself. Lily's Hope van Dyne literally steals the show, and if you've seen the film, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about here. Even so, there's a lot that Ant-Man's got on his plate himself. Sure, they've turned him into a sort of comic relief (as opposed to the smarts he boasted in the first film). Then again, he's been stuck at home for a while, and he's trying to be a good dad, a good boss, and a law-abiding (?) citizen.

Ready Ghost One

Hannah John-Kamen stars in Peyton Reed''s Ant-Man and the Wasp, a Marvel Studios and Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures release.

Now, while there is a (sort of) heist, like in the predecessor, Ant-Man and the Wasp focuses more on the romantic tension between Lang and Van Dyne, and Pym's love for his wife Janet (Michelle Pfeifer; Mother, 2017)—it's what you could call the quantum (pun intended) for the film also being dubbed a romance-equivalent. The most significant difference between this and the first one, however, stems from its antagonistic elements never being the same at any point in time (unlike the trailer suggests).
[Ghost's] intentions in the film have a much higher motive.
Sure, there's the no-good, bumbling bad guys (Walton, please stop), but it's the less-than-friendly Ghost (Hannah John-Kamen; Ready Player One, 2018) that takes the cake here. Her intentions in the film have a much higher motive—her powers come from a deeper, more personal place of tragedy, which is what gives the conflict any bit of heft it has. Then again, the movie really only focuses on a suitcase laboratory and the (admittedly) neatest set of Hot Wheels you'll ever see used in a film.

Say hello to my (not so) little kitty!

Peyton Reed's Ant-Man and the Wasp is a Marvel Studios and Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures release.

Despite the zippy action set-pieces and the comeback of Luis's (Michael Peña; End of Watch) terrific rapid-fire visual monologues, however, the movie really doesn't seem to throw as many punches as its predecessor. Sure, there's a lot about the quantum realm that works in favor of the universe's future, but coming from the same camp that brought us some real game-changers only this year—this Ant-Man sequel, unfortunately, might not seem like the larger-than-life movie audiences expect from the studio today.

VERDICT

Most of the fun in Ant-Man and the Wasp's direct predecessor seems to have been lost in translation, but it's still a lightweight addition to the Marvel universe that balances out the overwhelming broodiness of Infinity War. For a studio that's only been raising the stakes and standards of its superhero films, however, their latest might not exactly be on par with their best. Oh well.

About the Author

Kevin Sebastian

Twitter

Journalist, filmmaker, and fresh-outta-retirement Jedi master of the Kenobi bloodline. Rants about tech, movies, games, and life. Believes in the power of the force.

Plot

Scott Lang is living the simple life, trying to be a good citizen while he waits out the last of his house arrest. Between avoiding trouble, trying to be father-of-the-year, and starting a new company, Lang seems to have it all covered. Or does he?

Director

Release Year

Rated

PG-13

ELITE METER
0
%

Plot

Scott Lang is living the simple life, trying to be a good citizen while he waits out the last of his house arrest. Between avoiding trouble, trying to be father-of-the-year, and starting a new company, Lang seems to have it all covered. Or does he?

Director

Release Year

Rated

PG-13

ELITE METER
0
%