The Divergent Series: Allegiant

Tropes, tropes everywhere!


The Divergent Series: Allegiant

  • Tropes, tropes everywhere!

The Divergent Series: Allegiant

  • Tropes, tropes everywhere!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Shailene Woodley
Theo James
Ansel Elgort
Miles Teller
Jeff Daniels

Written by

Noah Oppenheim
Adam Cooper
Bill Collage
Veronica Roth (novel)

Directed by

Robert Schwentke



What to Expect

What’s there to expect from The Divergent Series beyond merely a good time at the movies with a bunch of characters doing things viewers have already witnessed in similar narrative structures? Nothing.

When Divergent released, it was touted to be something of a significant competition to The Hunger Games (except not really; Summit’s a part of Lionsgate, which backed the Jennifer Lawrence starring movies). Of course, that claim would as quickly be disproven, what with just how similar it looked like to other movies within the bracket—tropes and all.

And now that Allegiant‘s out, I couldn’t be bothered to expect possibly anything from it. It’s probably why I did actually manage to have fun. The movie, in reality, though, is an entirely different story altogether.

I guess nobody cares, though; and for a franchise that aims for nothing more than fan-service, it’s an entirely logical outcome. Oh well.

What’s it About?

Having cracked open “the box” from the last film, Allegiant tackles what’s beyond the infamous walls beyond the dystopian Chicago the series has continually given us.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Yo council members, why am I here in this movie again?

Yo council members, why am I here in this movie again?

The shaky start of The Divergent Series—courtesy its first installment—was enough for viewers to understand and expect nothing possibly life-changing from it. For this writer, thus, it was easier to accept and enjoy the strictly average Insurgent as an entirely enjoyable action-adventure film. Does that mean that the movie washed off its sins for simply being fun to watch? Not really. But one has to understand that Robert Schwentke and writer Akiva Goldsman tried to bump up the movie to a functional enough state.

With Schwentke having come back for Allegiant, viewers would expect a similar treatment—for if you aren’t a fan, at the very least viewers would need a good time at the movies. Fortunately, there’s enough movement in the story and the shots to keep laymen entertained enough. But here’s the problem. While Akiva Goldsman made an earnest attempt to bring life and organicity to the highly unoriginal source material, this new bunch of writers—all surprisingly talented ones—puts on the table a mixed bag. Schwentke gives the film a significant push with his treatment of the screenplay, which is definitely what makes the film watchable enough. But the screenwriting here works in parts, and the narrative feels so broken and inconsistent one can immediately identify which of the screenwriters could take credit for the scenes that stand out.

Another Predators sequel? Nah just a bunch of people pretending to be teenagers.

Another Predators sequel? Nah just a bunch of people pretending to be teenagers.

Take, for example, one of the best scenes (doesn’t say much about the film itself though) of Allegiant: the mob justice system. One of its strengths is it identifies itself so much with the kind of mob justice people in the 21st century are so prone towards it almost manages to send a shiver down your spine. Now I may be wrong, but let’s drive down the recesses of our brain to find out which other young adult film did the exact thing in—let’s be fair—a grittier fashion than this one. Wes Ball’s feature length directorial debut The Maze Runner presented its version of mob justice: it was low-key, had lesser people in a frame than Allegiant‘s spin did, and still rang spine-chillingly true on just how much bold propaganda sways our minds. And it’s not difficult to guess who was in the screenwriting team of Ball’s film, is it now?

One of the best characters in this movie is the least used: that of Octavia Spencer’s. There’s more to her than the eye can see, but it’s quite apparent that the makers don’t want the public to know that. Hers isn’t the only character who suffers, though; Maggie Q’s Tori, who had her story in the first film, exists merely to satisfy an old plot device in this one. There are just so many inconsistent and derivative directions the screenplay takes that there’s only so much the director could himself have done to save it. Sure, there’s great cinematography, a gorgeous (though, once again, conventional) production design, supported by a mixture of good CGI and terrific art direction. Oh and let’s not forget the kick-ass soundtrack by franchise returnee Joseph Trapanese. He kills it with his broad enough palette of sounds that, despite its familiarity, is sufficiently fresh to go with the scenes it supports.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The Fault in Our Movie Choices

The Fault in Our Movie Choices

Another major problem with the film would be Shailene Woodley and Theo James, who look legitimately tired with their continued presence in the franchise. Woodley, in particular, looks like she couldn’t be bothered to try—a shame, considering her earnestness is what mostly kept the first two films alive in the first place. Theo James, to whatever little credit he can get is alright, thankfully, and so is Miles Teller, who looks like he’s the only one having a ball in the movie, despite the caricaturist nature of his character. Jeff Daniels is severely miscast as the antagonist of the movie; it’s so hard to believe he’s an opposing force here. Also, pardon my flustered self, but what is Naomi Watts even doing here? Another phenomenal waste of talent would be Nadia Hilker, whose tour-de-force in last year’s romance-meets-horror genre bender Spring would still be fresh in the minds of those who’ve seen it. And I’d be repeating myself if I mentioned Octavia Spencer’s sorry state of affairs.

That’s the problem; the movie boasts of an ensemble cast, but can’t be bothered to provide them with even a shred of credibility.

Worth it?

Let’s be honest though: it’s not a bad film at all. In fact, it’s a watchable movie (and if one compares it with the disasters January has provided us, one would agree). The problem, however, is just how bland and derivative it is. And what’s worse; Woodley herself seems to be the least bothered about her presence in the movie.

If you’re looking for a good time at the movies, this sure is one—albeit sporadically. Allegiant may continue being better than the dull-as-ever Divergent, but can’t be bothered to be on par with Insurgent, which in itself was just another derivative young-adult action adventure movie with every single trope in obnoxious view. Fans, of course, might have a different story to tell, but that doesn’t change much at all.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Shailene Woodley
Theo James
Ansel Elgort
Miles Teller
Jeff Daniels

Written by

Noah Oppenheim
Adam Cooper
Bill Collage
Veronica Roth (novel)

Directed by

Robert Schwentke



What to Expect

What’s there to expect from The Divergent Series beyond merely a good time at the movies with a bunch of characters doing things viewers have already witnessed in similar narrative structures? Nothing.

When Divergent released, it was touted to be something of a significant competition to The Hunger Games (except not really; Summit’s a part of Lionsgate, which backed the Jennifer Lawrence starring movies). Of course, that claim would as quickly be disproven, what with just how similar it looked like to other movies within the bracket—tropes and all.

And now that Allegiant‘s out, I couldn’t be bothered to expect possibly anything from it. It’s probably why I did actually manage to have fun. The movie, in reality, though, is an entirely different story altogether.

I guess nobody cares, though; and for a franchise that aims for nothing more than fan-service, it’s an entirely logical outcome. Oh well.

What’s it About?

Having cracked open “the box” from the last film, Allegiant tackles what’s beyond the infamous walls beyond the dystopian Chicago the series has continually given us.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Yo council members, why am I here in this movie again?

Yo council members, why am I here in this movie again?

The shaky start of The Divergent Series—courtesy its first installment—was enough for viewers to understand and expect nothing possibly life-changing from it. For this writer, thus, it was easier to accept and enjoy the strictly average Insurgent as an entirely enjoyable action-adventure film. Does that mean that the movie washed off its sins for simply being fun to watch? Not really. But one has to understand that Robert Schwentke and writer Akiva Goldsman tried to bump up the movie to a functional enough state.

With Schwentke having come back for Allegiant, viewers would expect a similar treatment—for if you aren’t a fan, at the very least viewers would need a good time at the movies. Fortunately, there’s enough movement in the story and the shots to keep laymen entertained enough. But here’s the problem. While Akiva Goldsman made an earnest attempt to bring life and organicity to the highly unoriginal source material, this new bunch of writers—all surprisingly talented ones—puts on the table a mixed bag. Schwentke gives the film a significant push with his treatment of the screenplay, which is definitely what makes the film watchable enough. But the screenwriting here works in parts, and the narrative feels so broken and inconsistent one can immediately identify which of the screenwriters could take credit for the scenes that stand out.

Another Predators sequel? Nah just a bunch of people pretending to be teenagers.

Another Predators sequel? Nah just a bunch of people pretending to be teenagers.

Take, for example, one of the best scenes (doesn’t say much about the film itself though) of Allegiant: the mob justice system. One of its strengths is it identifies itself so much with the kind of mob justice people in the 21st century are so prone towards it almost manages to send a shiver down your spine. Now I may be wrong, but let’s drive down the recesses of our brain to find out which other young adult film did the exact thing in—let’s be fair—a grittier fashion than this one. Wes Ball’s feature length directorial debut The Maze Runner presented its version of mob justice: it was low-key, had lesser people in a frame than Allegiant‘s spin did, and still rang spine-chillingly true on just how much bold propaganda sways our minds. And it’s not difficult to guess who was in the screenwriting team of Ball’s film, is it now?

One of the best characters in this movie is the least used: that of Octavia Spencer’s. There’s more to her than the eye can see, but it’s quite apparent that the makers don’t want the public to know that. Hers isn’t the only character who suffers, though; Maggie Q’s Tori, who had her story in the first film, exists merely to satisfy an old plot device in this one. There are just so many inconsistent and derivative directions the screenplay takes that there’s only so much the director could himself have done to save it. Sure, there’s great cinematography, a gorgeous (though, once again, conventional) production design, supported by a mixture of good CGI and terrific art direction. Oh and let’s not forget the kick-ass soundtrack by franchise returnee Joseph Trapanese. He kills it with his broad enough palette of sounds that, despite its familiarity, is sufficiently fresh to go with the scenes it supports.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The Fault in Our Movie Choices

The Fault in Our Movie Choices

Another major problem with the film would be Shailene Woodley and Theo James, who look legitimately tired with their continued presence in the franchise. Woodley, in particular, looks like she couldn’t be bothered to try—a shame, considering her earnestness is what mostly kept the first two films alive in the first place. Theo James, to whatever little credit he can get is alright, thankfully, and so is Miles Teller, who looks like he’s the only one having a ball in the movie, despite the caricaturist nature of his character. Jeff Daniels is severely miscast as the antagonist of the movie; it’s so hard to believe he’s an opposing force here. Also, pardon my flustered self, but what is Naomi Watts even doing here? Another phenomenal waste of talent would be Nadia Hilker, whose tour-de-force in last year’s romance-meets-horror genre bender Spring would still be fresh in the minds of those who’ve seen it. And I’d be repeating myself if I mentioned Octavia Spencer’s sorry state of affairs.

That’s the problem; the movie boasts of an ensemble cast, but can’t be bothered to provide them with even a shred of credibility.

Worth it?

Let’s be honest though: it’s not a bad film at all. In fact, it’s a watchable movie (and if one compares it with the disasters January has provided us, one would agree). The problem, however, is just how bland and derivative it is. And what’s worse; Woodley herself seems to be the least bothered about her presence in the movie.

If you’re looking for a good time at the movies, this sure is one—albeit sporadically. Allegiant may continue being better than the dull-as-ever Divergent, but can’t be bothered to be on par with Insurgent, which in itself was just another derivative young-adult action adventure movie with every single trope in obnoxious view. Fans, of course, might have a different story to tell, but that doesn’t change much at all.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Shailene Woodley
Theo James
Ansel Elgort
Director Robert Schwentke
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

Oooooooh cool looking post-never mind.

Oooooooh cool looking post-never mind.

What’s there to expect from The Divergent Series beyond merely a good time at the movies with a bunch of characters doing things viewers have already witnessed in similar narrative structures? Nothing.

When Divergent released, it was touted to be something of a significant competition to The Hunger Games (except not really; Summit’s a part of Lionsgate, which backed the Jennifer Lawrence starring movies). Of course, that claim would as quickly be disproven, what with just how similar it looked like to other movies within the bracket—tropes and all.

And now that Allegiant‘s out, I couldn’t be bothered to expect possibly anything from it. It’s probably why I did actually manage to have fun. The movie, in reality, though, is an entirely different story altogether.

I guess nobody cares, though; and for a franchise that aims for nothing more than fan-service, it’s an entirely logical outcome. Oh well.

What’s it About?

Having cracked open “the box” from the last film, Allegiant tackles what’s beyond the infamous walls beyond the dystopian Chicago the series has continually given us.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Yo council members, why am I here in this movie again?

Yo council members, why am I here in this movie again?

The shaky start of The Divergent Series—courtesy its first installment—was enough for viewers to understand and expect nothing possibly life-changing from it. For this writer, thus, it was easier to accept and enjoy the strictly average Insurgent as an entirely enjoyable action-adventure film. Does that mean that the movie washed off its sins for simply being fun to watch? Not really. But one has to understand that Robert Schwentke and writer Akiva Goldsman tried to bump up the movie to a functional enough state.

With Schwentke having come back for Allegiant, viewers would expect a similar treatment—for if you aren’t a fan, at the very least viewers would need a good time at the movies. Fortunately, there’s enough movement in the story and the shots to keep laymen entertained enough. But here’s the problem. While Akiva Goldsman made an earnest attempt to bring life and organicity to the highly unoriginal source material, this new bunch of writers—all surprisingly talented ones—puts on the table a mixed bag. Schwentke gives the film a significant push with his treatment of the screenplay, which is definitely what makes the film watchable enough. But the screenwriting here works in parts, and the narrative feels so broken and inconsistent one can immediately identify which of the screenwriters could take credit for the scenes that stand out.

Another Predators sequel? Nah just a bunch of people pretending to be teenagers.

Another Predators sequel? Nah just a bunch of people pretending to be teenagers.

Take, for example, one of the best scenes (doesn’t say much about the film itself though) of Allegiant: the mob justice system. One of its strengths is it identifies itself so much with the kind of mob justice people in the 21st century are so prone towards it almost manages to send a shiver down your spine. Now I may be wrong, but let’s drive down the recesses of our brain to find out which other young adult film did the exact thing in—let’s be fair—a grittier fashion than this one. Wes Ball’s feature length directorial debut The Maze Runner presented its version of mob justice: it was low-key, had lesser people in a frame than Allegiant‘s spin did, and still rang spine-chillingly true on just how much bold propaganda sways our minds. And it’s not difficult to guess who was in the screenwriting team of Ball’s film, is it now?

One of the best characters in this movie is the least used: that of Octavia Spencer’s. There’s more to her than the eye can see, but it’s quite apparent that the makers don’t want the public to know that. Hers isn’t the only character who suffers, though; Maggie Q’s Tori, who had her story in the first film, exists merely to satisfy an old plot device in this one. There are just so many inconsistent and derivative directions the screenplay takes that there’s only so much the director could himself have done to save it. Sure, there’s great cinematography, a gorgeous (though, once again, conventional) production design, supported by a mixture of good CGI and terrific art direction. Oh and let’s not forget the kick-ass soundtrack by franchise returnee Joseph Trapanese. He kills it with his broad enough palette of sounds that, despite its familiarity, is sufficiently fresh to go with the scenes it supports.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The Fault in Our Movie Choices

The Fault in Our Movie Choices

Another major problem with the film would be Shailene Woodley and Theo James, who look legitimately tired with their continued presence in the franchise. Woodley, in particular, looks like she couldn’t be bothered to try—a shame, considering her earnestness is what mostly kept the first two films alive in the first place. Theo James, to whatever little credit he can get is alright, thankfully, and so is Miles Teller, who looks like he’s the only one having a ball in the movie, despite the caricaturist nature of his character. Jeff Daniels is severely miscast as the antagonist of the movie; it’s so hard to believe he’s an opposing force here. Also, pardon my flustered self, but what is Naomi Watts even doing here? Another phenomenal waste of talent would be Nadia Hilker, whose tour-de-force in last year’s romance-meets-horror genre bender Spring would still be fresh in the minds of those who’ve seen it. And I’d be repeating myself if I mentioned Octavia Spencer’s sorry state of affairs.

That’s the problem; the movie boasts of an ensemble cast, but can’t be bothered to provide them with even a shred of credibility.

Worth it?

Let’s be honest though: it’s not a bad film at all. In fact, it’s a watchable movie (and if one compares it with the disasters January has provided us, one would agree). The problem, however, is just how bland and derivative it is. And what’s worse; Woodley herself seems to be the least bothered about her presence in the movie.

If you’re looking for a good time at the movies, this sure is one—albeit sporadically. Allegiant may continue being better than the dull-as-ever Divergent, but can’t be bothered to be on par with Insurgent, which in itself was just another derivative young-adult action adventure movie with every single trope in obnoxious view. Fans, of course, might have a different story to tell, but that doesn’t change much at all.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Shailene Woodley
Theo James
Ansel Elgort
Director Robert Schwentke
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

What’s there to expect from The Divergent Series beyond merely a good time at the movies with a bunch of characters doing things viewers have already witnessed in similar narrative structures? Nothing.

When Divergent released, it was touted to be something of a significant competition to The Hunger Games (except not really; Summit’s a part of Lionsgate, which backed the Jennifer Lawrence starring movies). Of course, that claim would as quickly be disproven, what with just how similar it looked like to other movies within the bracket—tropes and all.

And now that Allegiant‘s out, I couldn’t be bothered to expect possibly anything from it. It’s probably why I did actually manage to have fun. The movie, in reality, though, is an entirely different story altogether.

I guess nobody cares, though; and for a franchise that aims for nothing more than fan-service, it’s an entirely logical outcome. Oh well.

What’s it About?

Having cracked open “the box” from the last film, Allegiant tackles what’s beyond the infamous walls beyond the dystopian Chicago the series has continually given us.

Yo council members, why am I here in this movie again?

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The shaky start of The Divergent Series—courtesy its first installment—was enough for viewers to understand and expect nothing possibly life-changing from it. For this writer, thus, it was easier to accept and enjoy the strictly average Insurgent as an entirely enjoyable action-adventure film. Does that mean that the movie washed off its sins for simply being fun to watch? Not really. But one has to understand that Robert Schwentke and writer Akiva Goldsman tried to bump up the movie to a functional enough state.

With Schwentke having come back for Allegiant, viewers would expect a similar treatment—for if you aren’t a fan, at the very least viewers would need a good time at the movies. Fortunately, there’s enough movement in the story and the shots to keep laymen entertained enough. But here’s the problem. While Akiva Goldsman made an earnest attempt to bring life and organicity to the highly unoriginal source material, this new bunch of writers—all surprisingly talented ones—puts on the table a mixed bag. Schwentke gives the film a significant push with his treatment of the screenplay, which is definitely what makes the film watchable enough. But the screenwriting here works in parts, and the narrative feels so broken and inconsistent one can immediately identify which of the screenwriters could take credit for the scenes that stand out.

The Fault in Our Movie Choices

Take, for example, one of the best scenes (doesn’t say much about the film itself though) of Allegiant: the mob justice system. One of its strengths is it identifies itself so much with the kind of mob justice people in the 21st century are so prone towards it almost manages to send a shiver down your spine. Now I may be wrong, but let’s drive down the recesses of our brain to find out which other young adult film did the exact thing in—let’s be fair—a grittier fashion than this one. Wes Ball’s feature length directorial debut The Maze Runner presented its version of mob justice: it was low-key, had lesser people in a frame than Allegiant‘s spin did, and still rang spine-chillingly true on just how much bold propaganda sways our minds. And it’s not difficult to guess who was in the screenwriting team of Ball’s film, is it now?

One of the best characters in this movie is the least used: that of Octavia Spencer’s. There’s more to her than the eye can see, but it’s quite apparent that the makers don’t want the public to know that. Hers isn’t the only character who suffers, though; Maggie Q’s Tori, who had her story in the first film, exists merely to satisfy an old plot device in this one. There are just so many inconsistent and derivative directions the screenplay takes that there’s only so much the director could himself have done to save it. Sure, there’s great cinematography, a gorgeous (though, once again, conventional) production design, supported by a mixture of good CGI and terrific art direction. Oh and let’s not forget the kick-ass soundtrack by franchise returnee Joseph Trapanese. He kills it with his broad enough palette of sounds that, despite its familiarity, is sufficiently fresh to go with the scenes it supports.

Another Predators sequel? Nah just a bunch of people pretending to be teenagers.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Another major problem with the film would be Shailene Woodley and Theo James, who look legitimately tired with their continued presence in the franchise. Woodley, in particular, looks like she couldn’t be bothered to try—a shame, considering her earnestness is what mostly kept the first two films alive in the first place. Theo James, to whatever little credit he can get is alright, thankfully, and so is Miles Teller, who looks like he’s the only one having a ball in the movie, despite the caricaturist nature of his character. Jeff Daniels is severely miscast as the antagonist of the movie; it’s so hard to believe he’s an opposing force here. Also, pardon my flustered self, but what is Naomi Watts even doing here? Another phenomenal waste of talent would be Nadia Hilker, whose tour-de-force in last year’s romance-meets-horror genre bender Spring would still be fresh in the minds of those who’ve seen it. And I’d be repeating myself if I mentioned Octavia Spencer’s sorry state of affairs.

That’s the problem; the movie boasts of an ensemble cast, but can’t be bothered to provide them with even a shred of credibility.

Worth it?

Let’s be honest though: it’s not a bad film at all. In fact, it’s a watchable movie (and if one compares it with the disasters January has provided us, one would agree). The problem, however, is just how bland and derivative it is. And what’s worse; Woodley herself seems to be the least bothered about her presence in the movie.

If you’re looking for a good time at the movies, this sure is one—albeit sporadically. Allegiant may continue being better than the dull-as-ever Divergent, but can’t be bothered to be on par with Insurgent, which in itself was just another derivative young-adult action adventure movie with every single trope in obnoxious view. Fans, of course, might have a different story to tell, but that doesn’t change much at all.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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