American Honey

Simple, yet spectacular


American Honey

  • Simple, yet spectacular

American Honey

  • Simple, yet spectacular


Rated

R

Starring

Sasha Lane
Shia LaBeouf
Riley Keough

Written by

Andrea Arnold

Directed by

Andrea Arnold



THE PLOT

Desperately clinging on to the last threads of hope, teenage girl Star (debutante Sasha Lane) sees redemption when she bumps into Jake (Shia LaBeouf; Charlie Countryman) and joins the magazine crew he’s a part of. While happiness doesn’t seem to stay consistent even with her new career, she takes solace in the possibility of finding herself.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

A hundred and sixty three minutes.

The total runtime of the Andrea Arnold helmed American Honey is a whopping hundred and sixty three minutes, which could open up a grand total of two possibilities:

  1. The movie’s a bloated mess, filled with plot contrivances that could as easily be avoided to form a shorter, more concise storytelling experience; or
  2. The sheer, expansive beauty of it justifies its runtime quite appropriately, thereby sucking its viewers into a rather diverse universe of its own.

And while its potential audience would be unable to correctly preempt which of the two is likely from the looks of the film in itself, Arnold’s rather consistent filmmaking abilities should, at the very least, hint us in the latter direction. From the dazzling Fish Tank to her prior directorial effort in the film adaptation of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, Arnold has successfully been able to tap into the hollow darkness in the lives of her protagonists and the metaphorical shining stars of happiness that struggle to hold them from shattering completely.

And while American Honey continues to remain faithful to her inherent storytelling trademarks, one finds out that there’s a lot more to discover.

THE MOVIE

Riley Keough, Shia LaBeouf - American Honey

Wanna grab some coffee on the way?

You wouldn’t immediately know, however.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness. Arnold doesn’t intend to shock, or pull any heartstrings. The frankness of her film is achieved by its sharp, straightforward storytelling that a few modern filmmakers–Xavier Dolan (Mommy), for an apt example–can achieve with such effortlessness.

Don’t mistake how easily the narrative flows for how painful do the spikes in its protagonist’s life feel. Sasha Lane, who brings in a powerfully understated performance, brilliantly translates to screen Arnold’s vision of Star’s psyche. When she stings, the viewers will echo her exact feelings. The displays of happiness and hurt stay away from over-amplification, which makes it all the more effective for its audience.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness.Ankit Ojha

Within its hyper-realistic narrative, however, Arnold manages to bring about some masterful creative liberties. In what could be some of the most self-aware writing in a film that strives to stay away from indulgence, Star is introduced to LaBeouf’s Jake in a hypermarket just as the playlist of its premises begin to blast Rihanna crooning to the lyrics of Calvin Harris’s We Found Love. The moment is ordinary; the sentiment behind it anything but.

In collaboration with the film’s music supervisor, Arnold brings together some of the most eclectic singles for a soundtrack that is both timely and narratively relevant. As the film quietens for its inevitable revelatory third act and viewers hear Lady Antebellum’s American Honey playing in Star’s regular employment transportation vehicle, everything seems to fall into place.

Sasha Lane - American Honey

I am ready to hit this world hard. Are you?

Including the actors. Every character, small or big—and there are a whole lot—only adds to the film’s atmospheric palpability, intoxicating you for each second in the hundred-and-sixty-odd minute runtime.  LaBeouf is, like always, a force of nature, playing off Lane’s strengths effortlessly as his character meanders in and out of the life of hers. Riley Keough is the film’s biggest surprise, however. Keough takes up the challenge of portraying what would seem, superficially, like a one-dimensional character, and brings it alive with the accuracy in her body language, pointed delivery of dialogue, and surefire conviction. Should one witness her on-screen, one would realize that nobody else would be close to replicating anything in the performative genius she pitches in here.

VERDICT

Essentially, American Honey plays out like an almost linear documentation on the lives of a magazine-crew. Dig deeper into its core, and you’ll find more to its hyper-realistic storytelling device than just that. The rattling conviction in Arnold’s display of her protagonist’s desperation to grab onto just about any shred of a silver lining is unmatchable, and has the power to stay on with its viewers days after they’ve watched the film, which, close to three hours in length, never seems to overstay its welcome.

It’s be a damn shame if Andrea Arnold’s American Honey—a film for the ages, and one of this year’s best—were skipped for a lack of knowledge on it, because it quite definitely needs to be seen as much, and by as many, as possible. Get on this one right now.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Sasha Lane
Shia LaBeouf
Riley Keough

Written by

Andrea Arnold

Directed by

Andrea Arnold



THE PLOT

Desperately clinging on to the last threads of hope, teenage girl Star (debutante Sasha Lane) sees redemption when she bumps into Jake (Shia LaBeouf; Charlie Countryman) and joins the magazine crew he’s a part of. While happiness doesn’t seem to stay consistent even with her new career, she takes solace in the possibility of finding herself.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

A hundred and sixty three minutes.

The total runtime of the Andrea Arnold helmed American Honey is a whopping hundred and sixty three minutes, which could open up a grand total of two possibilities:

  1. The movie’s a bloated mess, filled with plot contrivances that could as easily be avoided to form a shorter, more concise storytelling experience; or
  2. The sheer, expansive beauty of it justifies its runtime quite appropriately, thereby sucking its viewers into a rather diverse universe of its own.

And while its potential audience would be unable to correctly preempt which of the two is likely from the looks of the film in itself, Arnold’s rather consistent filmmaking abilities should, at the very least, hint us in the latter direction. From the dazzling Fish Tank to her prior directorial effort in the film adaptation of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, Arnold has successfully been able to tap into the hollow darkness in the lives of her protagonists and the metaphorical shining stars of happiness that struggle to hold them from shattering completely.

And while American Honey continues to remain faithful to her inherent storytelling trademarks, one finds out that there’s a lot more to discover.

THE MOVIE

Riley Keough, Shia LaBeouf - American Honey

Wanna grab some coffee on the way?

You wouldn’t immediately know, however.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness. Arnold doesn’t intend to shock, or pull any heartstrings. The frankness of her film is achieved by its sharp, straightforward storytelling that a few modern filmmakers–Xavier Dolan (Mommy), for an apt example–can achieve with such effortlessness.

Don’t mistake how easily the narrative flows for how painful do the spikes in its protagonist’s life feel. Sasha Lane, who brings in a powerfully understated performance, brilliantly translates to screen Arnold’s vision of Star’s psyche. When she stings, the viewers will echo her exact feelings. The displays of happiness and hurt stay away from over-amplification, which makes it all the more effective for its audience.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness.Ankit Ojha

Within its hyper-realistic narrative, however, Arnold manages to bring about some masterful creative liberties. In what could be some of the most self-aware writing in a film that strives to stay away from indulgence, Star is introduced to LaBeouf’s Jake in a hypermarket just as the playlist of its premises begin to blast Rihanna crooning to the lyrics of Calvin Harris’s We Found Love. The moment is ordinary; the sentiment behind it anything but.

In collaboration with the film’s music supervisor, Arnold brings together some of the most eclectic singles for a soundtrack that is both timely and narratively relevant. As the film quietens for its inevitable revelatory third act and viewers hear Lady Antebellum’s American Honey playing in Star’s regular employment transportation vehicle, everything seems to fall into place.

Sasha Lane - American Honey

I am ready to hit this world hard. Are you?

Including the actors. Every character, small or big—and there are a whole lot—only adds to the film’s atmospheric palpability, intoxicating you for each second in the hundred-and-sixty-odd minute runtime.  LaBeouf is, like always, a force of nature, playing off Lane’s strengths effortlessly as his character meanders in and out of the life of hers. Riley Keough is the film’s biggest surprise, however. Keough takes up the challenge of portraying what would seem, superficially, like a one-dimensional character, and brings it alive with the accuracy in her body language, pointed delivery of dialogue, and surefire conviction. Should one witness her on-screen, one would realize that nobody else would be close to replicating anything in the performative genius she pitches in here.

VERDICT

Essentially, American Honey plays out like an almost linear documentation on the lives of a magazine-crew. Dig deeper into its core, and you’ll find more to its hyper-realistic storytelling device than just that. The rattling conviction in Arnold’s display of her protagonist’s desperation to grab onto just about any shred of a silver lining is unmatchable, and has the power to stay on with its viewers days after they’ve watched the film, which, close to three hours in length, never seems to overstay its welcome.

It’s be a damn shame if Andrea Arnold’s American Honey—a film for the ages, and one of this year’s best—were skipped for a lack of knowledge on it, because it quite definitely needs to be seen as much, and by as many, as possible. Get on this one right now.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Sasha Lane
Riley Keough
Shia LaBeouf
Director Andrea Arnold
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

THE PLOT

Desperately clinging on to the last threads of hope, teenage girl Star (debutante Sasha Lane) sees redemption when she bumps into Jake (Shia LaBeouf; Charlie Countryman) and joins the magazine crew he’s a part of. While happiness doesn’t seem to stay consistent even with her new career, she takes solace in the possibility of finding herself.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

A hundred and sixty three minutes.

The total runtime of the Andrea Arnold helmed American Honey is a whopping hundred and sixty three minutes, which could open up a grand total of two possibilities:

  1. The movie’s a bloated mess, filled with plot contrivances that could as easily be avoided to form a shorter, more concise storytelling experience; or
  2. The sheer, expansive beauty of it justifies its runtime quite appropriately, thereby sucking its viewers into a rather diverse universe of its own.

And while its potential audience would be unable to correctly preempt which of the two is likely from the looks of the film in itself, Arnold’s rather consistent filmmaking abilities should, at the very least, hint us in the latter direction. From the dazzling Fish Tank to her prior directorial effort in the film adaptation of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, Arnold has successfully been able to tap into the hollow darkness in the lives of her protagonists and the metaphorical shining stars of happiness that struggle to hold them from shattering completely.

And while American Honey continues to remain faithful to her inherent storytelling trademarks, one finds out that there’s a lot more to discover.

THE MOVIE

Riley Keough, Shia LaBeouf - American Honey

Wanna grab some coffee on the way?

You wouldn’t immediately know, however.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness. Arnold doesn’t intend to shock, or pull any heartstrings. The frankness of her film is achieved by its sharp, straightforward storytelling that a few modern filmmakers–Xavier Dolan (Mommy), for an apt example–can achieve with such effortlessness.

Don’t mistake how easily the narrative flows for how painful do the spikes in its protagonist’s life feel. Sasha Lane, who brings in a powerfully understated performance, brilliantly translates to screen Arnold’s vision of Star’s psyche. When she stings, the viewers will echo her exact feelings. The displays of happiness and hurt stay away from over-amplification, which makes it all the more effective for its audience.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness.Ankit Ojha

Within its hyper-realistic narrative, however, Arnold manages to bring about some masterful creative liberties. In what could be some of the most self-aware writing in a film that strives to stay away from indulgence, Star is introduced to LaBeouf’s Jake in a hypermarket just as the playlist of its premises begin to blast Rihanna crooning to the lyrics of Calvin Harris’s We Found Love. The moment is ordinary; the sentiment behind it anything but.

In collaboration with the film’s music supervisor, Arnold brings together some of the most eclectic singles for a soundtrack that is both timely and narratively relevant. As the film quietens for its inevitable revelatory third act and viewers hear Lady Antebellum’s American Honey playing in Star’s regular employment transportation vehicle, everything seems to fall into place.

Sasha Lane - American Honey

I am ready to hit this world hard. Are you?

Including the actors. Every character, small or big—and there are a whole lot—only adds to the film’s atmospheric palpability, intoxicating you for each second in the hundred-and-sixty-odd minute runtime.  LaBeouf is, like always, a force of nature, playing off Lane’s strengths effortlessly as his character meanders in and out of the life of hers. Riley Keough is the film’s biggest surprise, however. Keough takes up the challenge of portraying what would seem, superficially, like a one-dimensional character, and brings it alive with the accuracy in her body language, pointed delivery of dialogue, and surefire conviction. Should one witness her on-screen, one would realize that nobody else would be close to replicating anything in the performative genius she pitches in here.

VERDICT

Essentially, American Honey plays out like an almost linear documentation on the lives of a magazine-crew. Dig deeper into its core, and you’ll find more to its hyper-realistic storytelling device than just that. The rattling conviction in Arnold’s display of her protagonist’s desperation to grab onto just about any shred of a silver lining is unmatchable, and has the power to stay on with its viewers days after they’ve watched the film, which, close to three hours in length, never seems to overstay its welcome.

It’s be a damn shame if Andrea Arnold’s American Honey—a film for the ages, and one of this year’s best—were skipped for a lack of knowledge on it, because it quite definitely needs to be seen as much, and by as many, as possible. Get on this one right now.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Sasha Lane
Riley Keough
Shia LaBeouf
Director Andrea Arnold
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

THE PLOT

Desperately clinging on to the last threads of hope, teenage girl Star (debutante Sasha Lane) sees redemption when she bumps into Jake (Shia LaBeouf; Charlie Countryman) and joins the magazine crew he’s a part of. While happiness doesn’t seem to stay consistent even with her new career, she takes solace in the possibility of finding herself.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

A hundred and sixty three minutes.

The total runtime of the Andrea Arnold helmed American Honey is a whopping hundred and sixty three minutes, which could open up a grand total of two possibilities:

  1. The movie’s a bloated mess, filled with plot contrivances that could as easily be avoided to form a shorter, more concise storytelling experience; or
  2. The sheer, expansive beauty of it justifies its runtime quite appropriately, thereby sucking its viewers into a rather diverse universe of its own.

And while its potential audience would be unable to correctly preempt which of the two is likely from the looks of the film in itself, Arnold’s rather consistent filmmaking abilities should, at the very least, hint us in the latter direction. From the dazzling Fish Tank to her prior directorial effort in the film adaptation of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, Arnold has successfully been able to tap into the hollow darkness in the lives of her protagonists and the metaphorical shining stars of happiness that struggle to hold them from shattering completely.

And while American Honey continues to remain faithful to her inherent storytelling trademarks, one finds out that there’s a lot more to discover.

THE MOVIE

Wanna grab some coffee on the way?

You wouldn’t immediately know, however.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness. Arnold doesn’t intend to shock, or pull any heartstrings. The frankness of her film is achieved by its sharp, straightforward storytelling that a few modern filmmakers–Xavier Dolan (Mommy), for an apt example–can achieve with such effortlessness.

Don’t mistake how easily the narrative flows for how painful do the spikes in its protagonist’s life feel. Sasha Lane, who brings in a powerfully understated performance, brilliantly translates to screen Arnold’s vision of Star’s psyche. When she stings, the viewers will echo her exact feelings. The displays of happiness and hurt stay away from over-amplification, which makes it all the more effective for its audience.

The sheer deceptiveness of the film’s narrative lies in its simplicity and unpretentiousness.Ankit Ojha

Within its hyper-realistic narrative, however, Arnold manages to bring about some masterful creative liberties. In what could be some of the most self-aware writing in a film that strives to stay away from indulgence, Star is introduced to LaBeouf’s Jake in a hypermarket just as the playlist of its premises begin to blast Rihanna crooning to the lyrics of Calvin Harris’s We Found Love. The moment is ordinary; the sentiment behind it anything but.

In collaboration with the film’s music supervisor, Arnold brings together some of the most eclectic singles for a soundtrack that is both timely and narratively relevant. As the film quietens for its inevitable revelatory third act and viewers hear Lady Antebellum’s American Honey playing in Star’s regular employment transportation vehicle, everything seems to fall into place.

Including the actors. Every character, small or big—and there are a whole lot—only adds to the film’s atmospheric palpability, intoxicating you for each second in the hundred-and-sixty-odd minute runtime.  LaBeouf is, like always, a force of nature, playing off Lane’s strengths effortlessly as his character meanders in and out of the life of hers. Riley Keough is the film’s biggest surprise, however. Keough takes up the challenge of portraying what would seem, superficially, like a one-dimensional character, and brings it alive with the accuracy in her body language, pointed delivery of dialogue, and surefire conviction. Should one witness her on-screen, one would realize that nobody else would be close to replicating anything in the performative genius she pitches in here.

I am ready to hit this world hard. Are you?

VERDICT

Essentially, American Honey plays out like an almost linear documentation on the lives of a magazine-crew. Dig deeper into its core, and you’ll find more to its hyper-realistic storytelling device than just that. The rattling conviction in Arnold’s display of her protagonist’s desperation to grab onto just about any shred of a silver lining is unmatchable, and has the power to stay on with its viewers days after they’ve watched the film, which, close to three hours in length, never seems to overstay its welcome.

It’s be a damn shame if Andrea Arnold’s American Honey—a film for the ages, and one of this year’s best—were skipped for a lack of knowledge on it, because it quite definitely needs to be seen as much, and by as many, as possible. Get on this one right now.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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