Ant-Man

A surprisingly entertaining low-key superhero flick!


Ant-Man

Starring: Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lilly
Directed by: Peyton Reed

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

Ant-Man

Starring: Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lilly
Directed by: Peyton Reed

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Paul Rudd
Michael Douglas
Evangeline Lilly
Corey Stoll
Michael Peña

Written by

Edgar Wright
Joe Cornish
Adam McKay
Paul Rudd

Directed by

Peyton Reed


coming up

What to Expect

With Ant-Man, I had nothing on me.

I mean, I really had hordes to expect from this film when Wright was attached to still direct the film then. But with Wright being replaced by Peyton Reed (The Break-Up), I didn’t know what to get out of it anymore. To make matters a tad bit worse, Avengers: Age of Ultron – precisely the last film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe – was a rather huge disappointment.

Yes, it stars – and is co-written by – Rudd, along with Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lily and the awesome-as-hell Michael Peña, but you’ve got to admit that when films change directors due to what’s probably not the most ambiguous excuse anymore (“creative differences”), you do tend to get extremely skeptical.

The question, however, is: should you? Should you really?

What’s it About?

Out of jail for possibly the biggest burglary ever, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd; This is 40) is on a constant struggle to set his life up, if only to be with and take care of his daughter. A deliberate domino-effect triggers a set of events that bring him face-to-face with Hank Pym (Michael Douglas; Wall Street), which will change his life forever.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

MARVEL'S ANT-MAN - Shot on location in San Francisco, Paul Rudd stars as Scott Lang AKA Ant-Man,  in Marvel Studio's Ant-Man, scheduled for release in the U.S. on July 17th, 2015.  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

“My days of breaking in and stealing things are over.”

The biggest thing about this film is how risky it sounds even on paper. The very title of the comic-book protagonist is bound to raise a rather cynical chuckle (or more) within the laymen who have no clue of the source material the studios are bringing to the big screen.

And to be extremely honest, a whole lotta people don’t.

The last time Marvel spun similarly was when Guardians of the Galaxy hit the viewers before they understood clearly the dynamics of what exactly hit them. And Ant-Man treads upon similar footsteps. Now, while the former is an extremely detailed space-opera action/adventure film with dollops of brightly timed humor, the latter isn’t comparatively as funny or as ambitiously expansive. It however has one very important quality: superior consistency.

Take your usual superhero origin story out of the context of your usual narrative tropes, insert some of the main plot-devices of this narrative within the framework of a heist-adventure trope, and mix that up really, really well with equal doses conventional emotion, unexpected humor and surprisingly thrilling set-pieces, and voila! You’ve got the perfect blend of what’s now possibly one of the biggest summer surprises to come out this year in the action-adventure genre.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Scott Lang/Ant-Man (Paul Rudd)  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

What a suit. Hahaha. Haha. Ha,

Rudd’s titular character a. k. a. Scott Lang has a rather tame beginning, but the rather consistent build-up, with all the chess-pieces kept in there for better effect give him a whole lot more layers than you’d expect. Sure, his motive might not be the most original, but it still surprisingly works within the narrative structure, giving itself some very interesting parallels between Rudd’s Lang and Michael Douglas’ Hank Pym, thereby giving the film a more evenly laid out relationship dynamic. Characters that support him include – and are primarily dominated by – Michael Peña, who is terrific, with each throw of his unassuming humor hitting exactly the right spots every single time. The movie consists of some of possibly the most surprising cameo appearances, of which one will find Anthony Mackie to be the most prominent, and another – in its later stages – that is bound to surprise their ardent followers.

Corey Stoll starts out as a perfectly pitched villain. His character, however, doesn’t exactly hold enough power to give the viewers any particular anxiety towards his actions in the later reels. Additionally, after retaining what’s possibly an extremely enjoyable heist narrative for around three-quarters of the film, we’re treated to an epic finale that’s well in-sync with superhero film tropes in general. This is thankfully more than made up for with fantastic humor laced carefully through the set-piece, and a rather surprising turn that reveals a foreshadowed plot device nobody would possibly have cared about when spoken of.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Luis (Michael Peña)  Photo Credit: Film Frame  © Marvel 2014

Ey man!

Despite it all however, the movie is a strong one, and a risk that’s definitely seemed to have paid off for the primary reason of it being extremely self-aware of how ridiculous it would sound on paper, using it extensively to its own advantage within the humor placed through the film. but that’s not all: the film is technically pretty strong too. Aside from Russell Carpenter’s (Jobs) strong, expansive cinematography, there’s extremely fluid VFX compositing, especially in high-movement action set-pieces, which is a win on its own. The film is also given a positive push with some really strong edit decisions. There’s also this fun, edgy music by Christophe Beck that spices up the film a good bit.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Predictably, Paul Rudd pulls off all aspects of his rather dynamic character arc pretty well. Whether it’s with those terrifically timed moments of awkward-dry humor, or with his relationship with his daughter and the urgency around it all, he embodies Scott Lang pretty well. And as for the titular superhero he’s given the task of playing out, he’s smooth. Real smooth. Michael Douglas, in possibly his first prominent role in years, is terrific. Be it with his trademark swagger-riddled cynical jabs or emotive moments, he’s damn well on-point. Evangeline Lilly lends strong support, with her adequate character arc reaching a progressive high-point never previously fathomed. I’m going to say flat-out that this is at the risk of repeating myself, but Michael Peña is the best thing that could happen to this movie. Corey Stoll delivers a great performance, but is trapped by the rather lukewarm progression of his character’s journey in the second act. Anthony Mackie (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) is a fun addition as Falcon, and it’s enjoyable to see him and his trademark character dynamics flow through the story without any possible idea of it looking any gimmicky. Bobby Cannavale (Danny Collins) does his usual cocky act once again – nothing new really. Others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Marvel's Ant-Man  Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly)   Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2015

Well. I can kick your rear end anytime I want. No, really.

I’d be lying if I said I’d expected nothing but the universe from this film. That being said, the fact that there are such mixed expectations for the film is one aspect Marvel seems to have taken the fullest advantage of, thereby giving us a surprisingly low-key superhero film that’s a much more entertaining experience than one’d ever have imagined. Thrilling and self-aware in equal measure, Ant-Man can definitely be looked at as the coolest decision Marvel’s made in the year of expanding their cinematic universe since Guardians of the Galaxy (and no, Avengers: Age of Ultron was not a cool decision). And that, in itself, is a win, all elements considered.

Definitely recommended.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Paul Rudd
Michael Douglas
Evangeline Lilly
Corey Stoll
Michael Peña

Written by

Edgar Wright
Joe Cornish
Adam McKay
Paul Rudd

Directed by

Peyton Reed


What to Expect

With Ant-Man, I had nothing on me.

I mean, I really had hordes to expect from this film when Wright was attached to still direct the film then. But with Wright being replaced by Peyton Reed (The Break-Up), I didn’t know what to get out of it anymore. To make matters a tad bit worse, Avengers: Age of Ultron – precisely the last film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe – was a rather huge disappointment.

Yes, it stars – and is co-written by – Rudd, along with Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lily and the awesome-as-hell Michael Peña, but you’ve got to admit that when films change directors due to what’s probably not the most ambiguous excuse anymore (“creative differences”), you do tend to get extremely skeptical.

The question, however, is: should you? Should you really?

What’s it About?

Out of jail for possibly the biggest burglary ever, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd; This is 40) is on a constant struggle to set his life up, if only to be with and take care of his daughter. A deliberate domino-effect triggers a set of events that bring him face-to-face with Hank Pym (Michael Douglas; Wall Street), which will change his life forever.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

MARVEL'S ANT-MAN - Shot on location in San Francisco, Paul Rudd stars as Scott Lang AKA Ant-Man,  in Marvel Studio's Ant-Man, scheduled for release in the U.S. on July 17th, 2015.  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

“My days of breaking in and stealing things are over.”

The biggest thing about this film is how risky it sounds even on paper. The very title of the comic-book protagonist is bound to raise a rather cynical chuckle (or more) within the laymen who have no clue of the source material the studios are bringing to the big screen.

And to be extremely honest, a whole lotta people don’t.

The last time Marvel spun similarly was when Guardians of the Galaxy hit the viewers before they understood clearly the dynamics of what exactly hit them. And Ant-Man treads upon similar footsteps. Now, while the former is an extremely detailed space-opera action/adventure film with dollops of brightly timed humor, the latter isn’t comparatively as funny or as ambitiously expansive. It however has one very important quality: superior consistency.

Take your usual superhero origin story out of the context of your usual narrative tropes, insert some of the main plot-devices of this narrative within the framework of a heist-adventure trope, and mix that up really, really well with equal doses conventional emotion, unexpected humor and surprisingly thrilling set-pieces, and voila! You’ve got the perfect blend of what’s now possibly one of the biggest summer surprises to come out this year in the action-adventure genre.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Scott Lang/Ant-Man (Paul Rudd)  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

What a suit. Hahaha. Haha. Ha,

Rudd’s titular character a. k. a. Scott Lang has a rather tame beginning, but the rather consistent build-up, with all the chess-pieces kept in there for better effect give him a whole lot more layers than you’d expect. Sure, his motive might not be the most original, but it still surprisingly works within the narrative structure, giving itself some very interesting parallels between Rudd’s Lang and Michael Douglas’ Hank Pym, thereby giving the film a more evenly laid out relationship dynamic. Characters that support him include – and are primarily dominated by – Michael Peña, who is terrific, with each throw of his unassuming humor hitting exactly the right spots every single time. The movie consists of some of possibly the most surprising cameo appearances, of which one will find Anthony Mackie to be the most prominent, and another – in its later stages – that is bound to surprise their ardent followers.

Corey Stoll starts out as a perfectly pitched villain. His character, however, doesn’t exactly hold enough power to give the viewers any particular anxiety towards his actions in the later reels. Additionally, after retaining what’s possibly an extremely enjoyable heist narrative for around three-quarters of the film, we’re treated to an epic finale that’s well in-sync with superhero film tropes in general. This is thankfully more than made up for with fantastic humor laced carefully through the set-piece, and a rather surprising turn that reveals a foreshadowed plot device nobody would possibly have cared about when spoken of.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Luis (Michael Peña)  Photo Credit: Film Frame  © Marvel 2014

Ey man!

Despite it all however, the movie is a strong one, and a risk that’s definitely seemed to have paid off for the primary reason of it being extremely self-aware of how ridiculous it would sound on paper, using it extensively to its own advantage within the humor placed through the film. but that’s not all: the film is technically pretty strong too. Aside from Russell Carpenter’s (Jobs) strong, expansive cinematography, there’s extremely fluid VFX compositing, especially in high-movement action set-pieces, which is a win on its own. The film is also given a positive push with some really strong edit decisions. There’s also this fun, edgy music by Christophe Beck that spices up the film a good bit.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Predictably, Paul Rudd pulls off all aspects of his rather dynamic character arc pretty well. Whether it’s with those terrifically timed moments of awkward-dry humor, or with his relationship with his daughter and the urgency around it all, he embodies Scott Lang pretty well. And as for the titular superhero he’s given the task of playing out, he’s smooth. Real smooth. Michael Douglas, in possibly his first prominent role in years, is terrific. Be it with his trademark swagger-riddled cynical jabs or emotive moments, he’s damn well on-point. Evangeline Lilly lends strong support, with her adequate character arc reaching a progressive high-point never previously fathomed. I’m going to say flat-out that this is at the risk of repeating myself, but Michael Peña is the best thing that could happen to this movie. Corey Stoll delivers a great performance, but is trapped by the rather lukewarm progression of his character’s journey in the second act. Anthony Mackie (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) is a fun addition as Falcon, and it’s enjoyable to see him and his trademark character dynamics flow through the story without any possible idea of it looking any gimmicky. Bobby Cannavale (Danny Collins) does his usual cocky act once again – nothing new really. Others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Marvel's Ant-Man  Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly)   Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2015

Well. I can kick your rear end anytime I want. No, really.

I’d be lying if I said I’d expected nothing but the universe from this film. That being said, the fact that there are such mixed expectations for the film is one aspect Marvel seems to have taken the fullest advantage of, thereby giving us a surprisingly low-key superhero film that’s a much more entertaining experience than one’d ever have imagined. Thrilling and self-aware in equal measure, Ant-Man can definitely be looked at as the coolest decision Marvel’s made in the year of expanding their cinematic universe since Guardians of the Galaxy (and no, Avengers: Age of Ultron was not a cool decision). And that, in itself, is a win, all elements considered.

Definitely recommended.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!

What to Expect

Insect Swag!

“Insect Swag!”

With Ant-Man, I had nothing on me.

I mean, I really had hordes to expect from this film when Wright was attached to still direct the film then. But with Wright being replaced by Peyton Reed (The Break-Up), I didn’t know what to get out of it anymore. To make matters a tad bit worse, Avengers: Age of Ultron – precisely the last film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe – was a rather huge disappointment.

Yes, it stars – and is co-written by – Rudd, along with Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lily and the awesome-as-hell Michael Peña, but you’ve got to admit that when films change directors due to what’s probably not the most ambiguous excuse anymore (“creative differences”), you do tend to get extremely skeptical.

The question, however, is: should you? Should you really?

What’s it About?

Out of jail for possibly the biggest burglary ever, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd; This is 40) is on a constant struggle to set his life up, if only to be with and take care of his daughter. A deliberate domino-effect triggers a set of events that bring him face-to-face with Hank Pym (Michael Douglas; Wall Street), which will change his life forever.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

MARVEL'S ANT-MAN - Shot on location in San Francisco, Paul Rudd stars as Scott Lang AKA Ant-Man,  in Marvel Studio's Ant-Man, scheduled for release in the U.S. on July 17th, 2015.  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

“My days of breaking in and stealing things are over.”

The biggest thing about this film is how risky it sounds even on paper. The very title of the comic-book protagonist is bound to raise a rather cynical chuckle (or more) within the laymen who have no clue of the source material the studios are bringing to the big screen.

And to be extremely honest, a whole lotta people don’t.

The last time Marvel spun similarly was when Guardians of the Galaxy hit the viewers before they understood clearly the dynamics of what exactly hit them. And Ant-Man treads upon similar footsteps. Now, while the former is an extremely detailed space-opera action/adventure film with dollops of brightly timed humor, the latter isn’t comparatively as funny or as ambitiously expansive. It however has one very important quality: superior consistency.

Take your usual superhero origin story out of the context of your usual narrative tropes, insert some of the main plot-devices of this narrative within the framework of a heist-adventure trope, and mix that up really, really well with equal doses conventional emotion, unexpected humor and surprisingly thrilling set-pieces, and voila! You’ve got the perfect blend of what’s now possibly one of the biggest summer surprises to come out this year in the action-adventure genre.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Scott Lang/Ant-Man (Paul Rudd)  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

What a suit. Hahaha. Haha. Ha,

Rudd’s titular character a. k. a. Scott Lang has a rather tame beginning, but the rather consistent build-up, with all the chess-pieces kept in there for better effect give him a whole lot more layers than you’d expect. Sure, his motive might not be the most original, but it still surprisingly works within the narrative structure, giving itself some very interesting parallels between Rudd’s Lang and Michael Douglas’ Hank Pym, thereby giving the film a more evenly laid out relationship dynamic. Characters that support him include – and are primarily dominated by – Michael Peña, who is terrific, with each throw of his unassuming humor hitting exactly the right spots every single time. The movie consists of some of possibly the most surprising cameo appearances, of which one will find Anthony Mackie to be the most prominent, and another – in its later stages – that is bound to surprise their ardent followers.

Corey Stoll starts out as a perfectly pitched villain. His character, however, doesn’t exactly hold enough power to give the viewers any particular anxiety towards his actions in the later reels. Additionally, after retaining what’s possibly an extremely enjoyable heist narrative for around three-quarters of the film, we’re treated to an epic finale that’s well in-sync with superhero film tropes in general. This is thankfully more than made up for with fantastic humor laced carefully through the set-piece, and a rather surprising turn that reveals a foreshadowed plot device nobody would possibly have cared about when spoken of.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Luis (Michael Peña)  Photo Credit: Film Frame  © Marvel 2014

Ey man!

Despite it all however, the movie is a strong one, and a risk that’s definitely seemed to have paid off for the primary reason of it being extremely self-aware of how ridiculous it would sound on paper, using it extensively to its own advantage within the humor placed through the film. but that’s not all: the film is technically pretty strong too. Aside from Russell Carpenter’s (Jobs) strong, expansive cinematography, there’s extremely fluid VFX compositing, especially in high-movement action set-pieces, which is a win on its own. The film is also given a positive push with some really strong edit decisions. There’s also this fun, edgy music by Christophe Beck that spices up the film a good bit.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Predictably, Paul Rudd pulls off all aspects of his rather dynamic character arc pretty well. Whether it’s with those terrifically timed moments of awkward-dry humor, or with his relationship with his daughter and the urgency around it all, he embodies Scott Lang pretty well. And as for the titular superhero he’s given the task of playing out, he’s smooth. Real smooth. Michael Douglas, in possibly his first prominent role in years, is terrific. Be it with his trademark swagger-riddled cynical jabs or emotive moments, he’s damn well on-point. Evangeline Lilly lends strong support, with her adequate character arc reaching a progressive high-point never previously fathomed. I’m going to say flat-out that this is at the risk of repeating myself, but Michael Peña is the best thing that could happen to this movie. Corey Stoll delivers a great performance, but is trapped by the rather lukewarm progression of his character’s journey in the second act. Anthony Mackie (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) is a fun addition as Falcon, and it’s enjoyable to see him and his trademark character dynamics flow through the story without any possible idea of it looking any gimmicky. Bobby Cannavale (Danny Collins) does his usual cocky act once again – nothing new really. Others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Marvel's Ant-Man  Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly)   Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2015

Well. I can kick your rear end anytime I want. No, really.

I’d be lying if I said I’d expected nothing but the universe from this film. That being said, the fact that there are such mixed expectations for the film is one aspect Marvel seems to have taken the fullest advantage of, thereby giving us a surprisingly low-key superhero film that’s a much more entertaining experience than one’d ever have imagined. Thrilling and self-aware in equal measure, Ant-Man can definitely be looked at as the coolest decision Marvel’s made in the year of expanding their cinematic universe since Guardians of the Galaxy (and no, Avengers: Age of Ultron was not a cool decision). And that, in itself, is a win, all elements considered.

Definitely recommended.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us

What to Expect

Insect Swag!

“Insect Swag!”

With Ant-Man, I had nothing on me.

I mean, I really had hordes to expect from this film when Wright was attached to still direct the film then. But with Wright being replaced by Peyton Reed (The Break-Up), I didn’t know what to get out of it anymore. To make matters a tad bit worse, Avengers: Age of Ultron – precisely the last film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe – was a rather huge disappointment.

Yes, it stars – and is co-written by – Rudd, along with Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lily and the awesome-as-hell Michael Peña, but you’ve got to admit that when films change directors due to what’s probably not the most ambiguous excuse anymore (“creative differences”), you do tend to get extremely skeptical.

The question, however, is: should you? Should you really?

What’s it About?

Out of jail for possibly the biggest burglary ever, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd; This is 40) is on a constant struggle to set his life up, if only to be with and take care of his daughter. A deliberate domino-effect triggers a set of events that bring him face-to-face with Hank Pym (Michael Douglas; Wall Street), which will change his life forever.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

MARVEL'S ANT-MAN - Shot on location in San Francisco, Paul Rudd stars as Scott Lang AKA Ant-Man,  in Marvel Studio's Ant-Man, scheduled for release in the U.S. on July 17th, 2015.  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

“My days of breaking in and stealing things are over.”

The biggest thing about this film is how risky it sounds even on paper. The very title of the comic-book protagonist is bound to raise a rather cynical chuckle (or more) within the laymen who have no clue of the source material the studios are bringing to the big screen.

And to be extremely honest, a whole lotta people don’t.

The last time Marvel spun similarly was when Guardians of the Galaxy hit the viewers before they understood clearly the dynamics of what exactly hit them. And Ant-Man treads upon similar footsteps. Now, while the former is an extremely detailed space-opera action/adventure film with dollops of brightly timed humor, the latter isn’t comparatively as funny or as ambitiously expansive. It however has one very important quality: superior consistency.

Take your usual superhero origin story out of the context of your usual narrative tropes, insert some of the main plot-devices of this narrative within the framework of a heist-adventure trope, and mix that up really, really well with equal doses conventional emotion, unexpected humor and surprisingly thrilling set-pieces, and voila! You’ve got the perfect blend of what’s now possibly one of the biggest summer surprises to come out this year in the action-adventure genre.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Scott Lang/Ant-Man (Paul Rudd)  Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2014

What a suit. Hahaha. Haha. Ha,

Rudd’s titular character a. k. a. Scott Lang has a rather tame beginning, but the rather consistent build-up, with all the chess-pieces kept in there for better effect give him a whole lot more layers than you’d expect. Sure, his motive might not be the most original, but it still surprisingly works within the narrative structure, giving itself some very interesting parallels between Rudd’s Lang and Michael Douglas’ Hank Pym, thereby giving the film a more evenly laid out relationship dynamic. Characters that support him include – and are primarily dominated by – Michael Peña, who is terrific, with each throw of his unassuming humor hitting exactly the right spots every single time. The movie consists of some of possibly the most surprising cameo appearances, of which one will find Anthony Mackie to be the most prominent, and another – in its later stages – that is bound to surprise their ardent followers.

Corey Stoll starts out as a perfectly pitched villain. His character, however, doesn’t exactly hold enough power to give the viewers any particular anxiety towards his actions in the later reels. Additionally, after retaining what’s possibly an extremely enjoyable heist narrative for around three-quarters of the film, we’re treated to an epic finale that’s well in-sync with superhero film tropes in general. This is thankfully more than made up for with fantastic humor laced carefully through the set-piece, and a rather surprising turn that reveals a foreshadowed plot device nobody would possibly have cared about when spoken of.

Marvel's Ant-Man  Luis (Michael Peña)  Photo Credit: Film Frame  © Marvel 2014

Ey man!

Despite it all however, the movie is a strong one, and a risk that’s definitely seemed to have paid off for the primary reason of it being extremely self-aware of how ridiculous it would sound on paper, using it extensively to its own advantage within the humor placed through the film. but that’s not all: the film is technically pretty strong too. Aside from Russell Carpenter’s (Jobs) strong, expansive cinematography, there’s extremely fluid VFX compositing, especially in high-movement action set-pieces, which is a win on its own. The film is also given a positive push with some really strong edit decisions. There’s also this fun, edgy music by Christophe Beck that spices up the film a good bit.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Predictably, Paul Rudd pulls off all aspects of his rather dynamic character arc pretty well. Whether it’s with those terrifically timed moments of awkward-dry humor, or with his relationship with his daughter and the urgency around it all, he embodies Scott Lang pretty well. And as for the titular superhero he’s given the task of playing out, he’s smooth. Real smooth. Michael Douglas, in possibly his first prominent role in years, is terrific. Be it with his trademark swagger-riddled cynical jabs or emotive moments, he’s damn well on-point. Evangeline Lilly lends strong support, with her adequate character arc reaching a progressive high-point never previously fathomed. I’m going to say flat-out that this is at the risk of repeating myself, but Michael Peña is the best thing that could happen to this movie. Corey Stoll delivers a great performance, but is trapped by the rather lukewarm progression of his character’s journey in the second act. Anthony Mackie (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) is a fun addition as Falcon, and it’s enjoyable to see him and his trademark character dynamics flow through the story without any possible idea of it looking any gimmicky. Bobby Cannavale (Danny Collins) does his usual cocky act once again – nothing new really. Others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Marvel's Ant-Man  Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly)   Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal  © Marvel 2015

Well. I can kick your rear end anytime I want. No, really.

I’d be lying if I said I’d expected nothing but the universe from this film. That being said, the fact that there are such mixed expectations for the film is one aspect Marvel seems to have taken the fullest advantage of, thereby giving us a surprisingly low-key superhero film that’s a much more entertaining experience than one’d ever have imagined. Thrilling and self-aware in equal measure, Ant-Man can definitely be looked at as the coolest decision Marvel’s made in the year of expanding their cinematic universe since Guardians of the Galaxy (and no, Avengers: Age of Ultron was not a cool decision). And that, in itself, is a win, all elements considered.

Definitely recommended.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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