Black Mass

There was a good movie hidden somewhere in there!


Black Mass

  • There was a good movie hidden somewhere in there!

Black Mass

  • There was a good movie hidden somewhere in there!


Rated

R

Starring

Johnny Depp
Joel Edgerton
Dakota Johnson
Kevin Bacon
Benedict Cumberbatch

Written by

Mark Mallouk
Jez Butterworth
Dick Lehr (book)
Gerard O-Neill (book)

Directed by

Scott Cooper



What to Expect

I have been avoiding Johnny Depp movies like the plague of late. And you can’t really blame me, because most of Depp’s choices, although probably original as hell, aren’t really supported by a great narrative. Or a narrative.

Or basically anything great, to be completely honest.

Basically, I’ve got trust issues with his association to any project, primarily because they didn’t transcend themselves from mediocrity enough (shh, it’s okay! You just read a bad pun. It’s o-kay). Not that he’s suddenly become a bad actor; it’s just that every one of his recent films has been literal canine-poop. This is a probable reason why I didn’t feel like watching Black Mass at all. Despite the inclusion of Scott Cooper.

Not that the director of the critical-darling of a debut Crazy Heart was all spick-and-span; his second auteur-driven movie Out of the Furnace was probably not all that great. And so, despite the interesting trailer of Black Mass, with its stellar cast of Joel Edgerton (The Gift), Dakota Johnson (television’s Ben and Kate) and Benedict Cumberbatch, I’ve been limitlessly skeptical. But somewhere along the lines, I had hope inside of me. A very weird sort’a hope. One that the movie would have the potential to prove the skeptic in me wrong.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, Black Mass chronicles the misadventures of the FBI when one of its agents (Edgerton) decides to take on criminal James “Whitey” Bulger as its informant.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Will it, or won't it work?

Will it, or won’t it work?

Despite the little hope that I had within myself, I really didn’t know what to expect from a movie that starred Johnny Depp anymore. Going in without any set expectations to cinemas to watch a movie, however, can’t always mean your opinion to it will be tilted in favor of it. And while the first twenty minutes to a half hour are definitely enjoyable, the rest of the movie just really doesn’t take off, ever. Within this first quarter itself, the film starts in possibly the most generic way a narrative of such a film would ever begin: flashbacks, supported, basically by multi-faceted voice-overs.

(Not that I don’t love voice-overs. A film like Martin Scorcese’s Goodfellas was able to give a terrific insight into the life of our protagonist. Also a product of Warner Bros., the film is definitely what I’d call one of the best centering around the world of crime. That it was also based on true events may not do much, but that it was an extremely gripping account of the world of its characters matters a whole lot.)

An excellent way to point out how close this film is to trying desperately hard at being the next Goodfellas is just how much a particular scene wherein one of Bulger’s more volatile members is treated somewhere around the beginning of the film echoes a very important plot point involving a certain equally volatile character’s culmination within its inspiration’s (?) second half. Not that it doesn’t throw in an impact to the audience; it definitely has the potential to catch you unawares and jolt you out of your seat, big time. Doesn’t discount that it feels less like a throwback and more like it’s trying real hard.

How many shades of whatever the hell that color's called do I count here?

How many shades of whatever the hell that color’s called do I count here?

“Well, everybody wants to try to make a Goodfellas,” [sic] stated Bill, a friend of mine as I callously stated how similarly they felt in our post-movie discussion on this film and the kind of films that easily fall under this bracket. But that’s not the only film I could connect it to. Edgerton’s character reminded me a lot of Damon’s role in The Departed (yet another Scorcese film) for some odd reason I can’t really point out, except, of course, for how subtly similar their characters may be.

I’m not denying the truth to this fictional account. All I’m saying is that the whole film and the way it’s constructed feels extremely derivative, solid as it may visually look. Cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi (Silver Linings Playbook) takes great advantage of the almost authentic production design, and frames his shots well. While the film definitely looks visually expansive thus, embellished with decent steadily moving camerawork, the cinematography offers nothing more than functional framing decision. A lot of times, there’s a lot going on that can be mounted visually within a frame to tell the story better. This isn’t really the case here; however, the shots do look strikingly beautiful. David Rosenbloom (The Insider) is the one who makes an earnest effort to further the storytelling devices through his efficient, sharp edit decisions. Letting the shots within the beginning and ending of a scene linger, there’s almost an attempt Rosenbloom’s making to allow us to involve ourselves to a scene. Junkie XL (Mad Max: Fury Road) is an otherwise terrific music composer-producer who unfortunately creates something extremely generic and template-like for most scenes.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Oooooh I have make-up on me. Surprise!

Oooooh I have make-up on me. Surprise!

Johnny Depp is a solid actor. I know it. It’s just that most of he roles he chooses allows him to tilt more toward the outward than the inward. Depp does make a convincing enough attempt to pull off Bulger’s persona, and has a few scenes where he’s definitely able to pass through you like a knife. It’s still the make-up and prosthetics that manage to stand out more than him though. In more than some scenes, you’re rudely awakened to the reminder that he’s Johnny Depp, and not his character. This shouldn’t happen. When it comes to larger-than-life roles, you should never be able to feel that an actor is not his character; not for a single second. The moment you do, it marks an obvious failure on Depp’s part.

The people who do actually hold the show, however, are Joel Edgerton and Benedict Cumberbatch. The latter especially blows you away with how consistently and convincingly he handles his accent and makes it his own. There’s a certain calm and bodily freedom that manages to overpower the otherwise redundant socially-inept-clever-guy image that he’s managed to create – and keep – with television’s Sherlock and, more recently, The Imitation Game. Edgerton, on the other hand, with his confident swagger and cocky smile, manages to pull you into his character, making him miles more multidimensional than Bulger’s. Dakota Johnson is great, but stays for an extremely short while. Ditto for Kevin Bacon and Corey Stoll; strong performers who are wasted. David Harbour is efficient.

Worth it?

Is the film bad? No it’s not. It’s a moderately made, if derivative, movie. It, however, fails to manipulate us to either empathize, or even become a vague part of their world. The viewers are but spectators of a drama that cannot seem too inviting for more than a quarter of the film’s runtime, Despite some of the most solid performances in the form of Edgerton, Cumberbatch and Johnson, Depp’s moderate performance and distracting physical appearance that seems almost distinguishable from the self doesn’t seem to help much, considering this – after all – is his film.

“Hidden inside [Black Mass] was a great movie”, Bill candidly remarked as we trailed out of the cinemas. I smiled in agreement to myself for a split-second, and then turned to add, “A great movie that was desperately screaming for help to get out, but was unfortunately suffocated to death.”

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Johnny Depp
Joel Edgerton
Dakota Johnson
Kevin Bacon
Benedict Cumberbatch

Written by

Mark Mallouk
Jez Butterworth
Dick Lehr (book)
Gerard O-Neill (book)

Directed by

Scott Cooper



What to Expect

I have been avoiding Johnny Depp movies like the plague of late. And you can’t really blame me, because most of Depp’s choices, although probably original as hell, aren’t really supported by a great narrative. Or a narrative.

Or basically anything great, to be completely honest.

Basically, I’ve got trust issues with his association to any project, primarily because they didn’t transcend themselves from mediocrity enough (shh, it’s okay! You just read a bad pun. It’s o-kay). Not that he’s suddenly become a bad actor; it’s just that every one of his recent films has been literal canine-poop. This is a probable reason why I didn’t feel like watching Black Mass at all. Despite the inclusion of Scott Cooper.

Not that the director of the critical-darling of a debut Crazy Heart was all spick-and-span; his second auteur-driven movie Out of the Furnace was probably not all that great. And so, despite the interesting trailer of Black Mass, with its stellar cast of Joel Edgerton (The Gift), Dakota Johnson (television’s Ben and Kate) and Benedict Cumberbatch, I’ve been limitlessly skeptical. But somewhere along the lines, I had hope inside of me. A very weird sort’a hope. One that the movie would have the potential to prove the skeptic in me wrong.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, Black Mass chronicles the misadventures of the FBI when one of its agents (Edgerton) decides to take on criminal James “Whitey” Bulger as its informant.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Will it, or won't it work?

Will it, or won’t it work?

Despite the little hope that I had within myself, I really didn’t know what to expect from a movie that starred Johnny Depp anymore. Going in without any set expectations to cinemas to watch a movie, however, can’t always mean your opinion to it will be tilted in favor of it. And while the first twenty minutes to a half hour are definitely enjoyable, the rest of the movie just really doesn’t take off, ever. Within this first quarter itself, the film starts in possibly the most generic way a narrative of such a film would ever begin: flashbacks, supported, basically by multi-faceted voice-overs.

(Not that I don’t love voice-overs. A film like Martin Scorcese’s Goodfellas was able to give a terrific insight into the life of our protagonist. Also a product of Warner Bros., the film is definitely what I’d call one of the best centering around the world of crime. That it was also based on true events may not do much, but that it was an extremely gripping account of the world of its characters matters a whole lot.)

An excellent way to point out how close this film is to trying desperately hard at being the next Goodfellas is just how much a particular scene wherein one of Bulger’s more volatile members is treated somewhere around the beginning of the film echoes a very important plot point involving a certain equally volatile character’s culmination within its inspiration’s (?) second half. Not that it doesn’t throw in an impact to the audience; it definitely has the potential to catch you unawares and jolt you out of your seat, big time. Doesn’t discount that it feels less like a throwback and more like it’s trying real hard.

How many shades of whatever the hell that color's called do I count here?

How many shades of whatever the hell that color’s called do I count here?

“Well, everybody wants to try to make a Goodfellas,” [sic] stated Bill, a friend of mine as I callously stated how similarly they felt in our post-movie discussion on this film and the kind of films that easily fall under this bracket. But that’s not the only film I could connect it to. Edgerton’s character reminded me a lot of Damon’s role in The Departed (yet another Scorcese film) for some odd reason I can’t really point out, except, of course, for how subtly similar their characters may be.

I’m not denying the truth to this fictional account. All I’m saying is that the whole film and the way it’s constructed feels extremely derivative, solid as it may visually look. Cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi (Silver Linings Playbook) takes great advantage of the almost authentic production design, and frames his shots well. While the film definitely looks visually expansive thus, embellished with decent steadily moving camerawork, the cinematography offers nothing more than functional framing decision. A lot of times, there’s a lot going on that can be mounted visually within a frame to tell the story better. This isn’t really the case here; however, the shots do look strikingly beautiful. David Rosenbloom (The Insider) is the one who makes an earnest effort to further the storytelling devices through his efficient, sharp edit decisions. Letting the shots within the beginning and ending of a scene linger, there’s almost an attempt Rosenbloom’s making to allow us to involve ourselves to a scene. Junkie XL (Mad Max: Fury Road) is an otherwise terrific music composer-producer who unfortunately creates something extremely generic and template-like for most scenes.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Oooooh I have make-up on me. Surprise!

Oooooh I have make-up on me. Surprise!

Johnny Depp is a solid actor. I know it. It’s just that most of he roles he chooses allows him to tilt more toward the outward than the inward. Depp does make a convincing enough attempt to pull off Bulger’s persona, and has a few scenes where he’s definitely able to pass through you like a knife. It’s still the make-up and prosthetics that manage to stand out more than him though. In more than some scenes, you’re rudely awakened to the reminder that he’s Johnny Depp, and not his character. This shouldn’t happen. When it comes to larger-than-life roles, you should never be able to feel that an actor is not his character; not for a single second. The moment you do, it marks an obvious failure on Depp’s part.

The people who do actually hold the show, however, are Joel Edgerton and Benedict Cumberbatch. The latter especially blows you away with how consistently and convincingly he handles his accent and makes it his own. There’s a certain calm and bodily freedom that manages to overpower the otherwise redundant socially-inept-clever-guy image that he’s managed to create – and keep – with television’s Sherlock and, more recently, The Imitation Game. Edgerton, on the other hand, with his confident swagger and cocky smile, manages to pull you into his character, making him miles more multidimensional than Bulger’s. Dakota Johnson is great, but stays for an extremely short while. Ditto for Kevin Bacon and Corey Stoll; strong performers who are wasted. David Harbour is efficient.

Worth it?

Is the film bad? No it’s not. It’s a moderately made, if derivative, movie. It, however, fails to manipulate us to either empathize, or even become a vague part of their world. The viewers are but spectators of a drama that cannot seem too inviting for more than a quarter of the film’s runtime, Despite some of the most solid performances in the form of Edgerton, Cumberbatch and Johnson, Depp’s moderate performance and distracting physical appearance that seems almost distinguishable from the self doesn’t seem to help much, considering this – after all – is his film.

“Hidden inside [Black Mass] was a great movie”, Bill candidly remarked as we trailed out of the cinemas. I smiled in agreement to myself for a split-second, and then turned to add, “A great movie that was desperately screaming for help to get out, but was unfortunately suffocated to death.”

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Johnny Depp
Joel Edgerton
Benedict Cumberbatch
Director Scott Cooper
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

Too many awesome people! And Johnny Depp.

Too many awesome people! And Johnny Depp.

I have been avoiding Johnny Depp movies like the plague of late. And you can’t really blame me, because most of Depp’s choices, although probably original as hell, aren’t really supported by a great narrative. Or a narrative.

Or basically anything great, to be completely honest.

Basically, I’ve got trust issues with his association to any project, primarily because they didn’t transcend themselves from mediocrity enough (shh, it’s okay! You just read a bad pun. It’s o-kay). Not that he’s suddenly become a bad actor; it’s just that every one of his recent films has been literal canine-poop. This is a probable reason why I didn’t feel like watching Black Mass at all. Despite the inclusion of Scott Cooper.

Not that the director of the critical-darling of a debut Crazy Heart was all spick-and-span; his second auteur-driven movie Out of the Furnace was probably not all that great. And so, despite the interesting trailer of Black Mass, with its stellar cast of Joel Edgerton (The Gift), Dakota Johnson (television’s Ben and Kate) and Benedict Cumberbatch, I’ve been limitlessly skeptical. But somewhere along the lines, I had hope inside of me. A very weird sort’a hope. One that the movie would have the potential to prove the skeptic in me wrong.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, Black Mass chronicles the misadventures of the FBI when one of its agents (Edgerton) decides to take on criminal James “Whitey” Bulger as its informant.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Will it, or won't it work?

Will it, or won’t it work?

Despite the little hope that I had within myself, I really didn’t know what to expect from a movie that starred Johnny Depp anymore. Going in without any set expectations to cinemas to watch a movie, however, can’t always mean your opinion to it will be tilted in favor of it. And while the first twenty minutes to a half hour are definitely enjoyable, the rest of the movie just really doesn’t take off, ever. Within this first quarter itself, the film starts in possibly the most generic way a narrative of such a film would ever begin: flashbacks, supported, basically by multi-faceted voice-overs.

(Not that I don’t love voice-overs. A film like Martin Scorcese’s Goodfellas was able to give a terrific insight into the life of our protagonist. Also a product of Warner Bros., the film is definitely what I’d call one of the best centering around the world of crime. That it was also based on true events may not do much, but that it was an extremely gripping account of the world of its characters matters a whole lot.)

An excellent way to point out how close this film is to trying desperately hard at being the next Goodfellas is just how much a particular scene wherein one of Bulger’s more volatile members is treated somewhere around the beginning of the film echoes a very important plot point involving a certain equally volatile character’s culmination within its inspiration’s (?) second half. Not that it doesn’t throw in an impact to the audience; it definitely has the potential to catch you unawares and jolt you out of your seat, big time. Doesn’t discount that it feels less like a throwback and more like it’s trying real hard.

How many shades of whatever the hell that color's called do I count here?

How many shades of whatever the hell that color’s called do I count here?

“Well, everybody wants to try to make a Goodfellas,” [sic] stated Bill, a friend of mine as I callously stated how similarly they felt in our post-movie discussion on this film and the kind of films that easily fall under this bracket. But that’s not the only film I could connect it to. Edgerton’s character reminded me a lot of Damon’s role in The Departed (yet another Scorcese film) for some odd reason I can’t really point out, except, of course, for how subtly similar their characters may be.

I’m not denying the truth to this fictional account. All I’m saying is that the whole film and the way it’s constructed feels extremely derivative, solid as it may visually look. Cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi (Silver Linings Playbook) takes great advantage of the almost authentic production design, and frames his shots well. While the film definitely looks visually expansive thus, embellished with decent steadily moving camerawork, the cinematography offers nothing more than functional framing decision. A lot of times, there’s a lot going on that can be mounted visually within a frame to tell the story better. This isn’t really the case here; however, the shots do look strikingly beautiful. David Rosenbloom (The Insider) is the one who makes an earnest effort to further the storytelling devices through his efficient, sharp edit decisions. Letting the shots within the beginning and ending of a scene linger, there’s almost an attempt Rosenbloom’s making to allow us to involve ourselves to a scene. Junkie XL (Mad Max: Fury Road) is an otherwise terrific music composer-producer who unfortunately creates something extremely generic and template-like for most scenes.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Oooooh I have make-up on me. Surprise!

Oooooh I have make-up on me. Surprise!

Johnny Depp is a solid actor. I know it. It’s just that most of he roles he chooses allows him to tilt more toward the outward than the inward. Depp does make a convincing enough attempt to pull off Bulger’s persona, and has a few scenes where he’s definitely able to pass through you like a knife. It’s still the make-up and prosthetics that manage to stand out more than him though. In more than some scenes, you’re rudely awakened to the reminder that he’s Johnny Depp, and not his character. This shouldn’t happen. When it comes to larger-than-life roles, you should never be able to feel that an actor is not his character; not for a single second. The moment you do, it marks an obvious failure on Depp’s part.

The people who do actually hold the show, however, are Joel Edgerton and Benedict Cumberbatch. The latter especially blows you away with how consistently and convincingly he handles his accent and makes it his own. There’s a certain calm and bodily freedom that manages to overpower the otherwise redundant socially-inept-clever-guy image that he’s managed to create – and keep – with television’s Sherlock and, more recently, The Imitation Game. Edgerton, on the other hand, with his confident swagger and cocky smile, manages to pull you into his character, making him miles more multidimensional than Bulger’s. Dakota Johnson is great, but stays for an extremely short while. Ditto for Kevin Bacon and Corey Stoll; strong performers who are wasted. David Harbour is efficient.

Worth it?

Is the film bad? No it’s not. It’s a moderately made, if derivative, movie. It, however, fails to manipulate us to either empathize, or even become a vague part of their world. The viewers are but spectators of a drama that cannot seem too inviting for more than a quarter of the film’s runtime, Despite some of the most solid performances in the form of Edgerton, Cumberbatch and Johnson, Depp’s moderate performance and distracting physical appearance that seems almost distinguishable from the self doesn’t seem to help much, considering this – after all – is his film.

“Hidden inside [Black Mass] was a great movie”, Bill candidly remarked as we trailed out of the cinemas. I smiled in agreement to myself for a split-second, and then turned to add, “A great movie that was desperately screaming for help to get out, but was unfortunately suffocated to death.”

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Johnny Depp
Joel Edgerton
Benedict Cumberbatch
Director Scott Cooper
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

I have been avoiding Johnny Depp movies like the plague of late. And you can’t really blame me, because most of Depp’s choices, although probably original as hell, aren’t really supported by a great narrative. Or a narrative.

Or basically anything great, to be completely honest.

Basically, I’ve got trust issues with his association to any project, primarily because they didn’t transcend themselves from mediocrity enough (shh, it’s okay! You just read a bad pun. It’s o-kay). Not that he’s suddenly become a bad actor; it’s just that every one of his recent films has been literal canine-poop. This is a probable reason why I didn’t feel like watching Black Mass at all. Despite the inclusion of Scott Cooper.

Not that the director of the critical-darling of a debut Crazy Heart was all spick-and-span; his second auteur-driven movie Out of the Furnace was probably not all that great. And so, despite the interesting trailer of Black Mass, with its stellar cast of Joel Edgerton (The Gift), Dakota Johnson (television’s Ben and Kate) and Benedict Cumberbatch, I’ve been limitlessly skeptical. But somewhere along the lines, I had hope inside of me. A very weird sort’a hope. One that the movie would have the potential to prove the skeptic in me wrong.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, Black Mass chronicles the misadventures of the FBI when one of its agents (Edgerton) decides to take on criminal James “Whitey” Bulger as its informant.

Will it, or won't it work?

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Despite the little hope that I had within myself, I really didn’t know what to expect from a movie that starred Johnny Depp anymore. Going in without any set expectations to cinemas to watch a movie, however, can’t always mean your opinion to it will be tilted in favor of it. And while the first twenty minutes to a half hour are definitely enjoyable, the rest of the movie just really doesn’t take off, ever. Within this first quarter itself, the film starts in possibly the most generic way a narrative of such a film would ever begin: flashbacks, supported, basically by multi-faceted voice-overs.

(Not that I don’t love voice-overs. A film like Martin Scorcese’s Goodfellas was able to give a terrific insight into the life of our protagonist. Also a product of Warner Bros., the film is definitely what I’d call one of the best centering around the world of crime. That it was also based on true events may not do much, but that it was an extremely gripping account of the world of its characters matters a whole lot.)

An excellent way to point out how close this film is to trying desperately hard at being the next Goodfellas is just how much a particular scene wherein one of Bulger’s more volatile members is treated somewhere around the beginning of the film echoes a very important plot point involving a certain equally volatile character’s culmination within its inspiration’s (?) second half. Not that it doesn’t throw in an impact to the audience; it definitely has the potential to catch you unawares and jolt you out of your seat, big time. Doesn’t discount that it feels less like a throwback and more like it’s trying real hard.

How many shades of whatever the hell that color's called do I count here?

“Well, everybody wants to try to make a Goodfellas,” [sic] stated Bill, a friend of mine as I callously stated how similarly they felt in our post-movie discussion on this film and the kind of films that easily fall under this bracket. But that’s not the only film I could connect it to. Edgerton’s character reminded me a lot of Damon’s role in The Departed (yet another Scorcese film) for some odd reason I can’t really point out, except, of course, for how subtly similar their characters may be.

I’m not denying the truth to this fictional account. All I’m saying is that the whole film and the way it’s constructed feels extremely derivative, solid as it may visually look. Cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi (Silver Linings Playbook) takes great advantage of the almost authentic production design, and frames his shots well. While the film definitely looks visually expansive thus, embellished with decent steadily moving camerawork, the cinematography offers nothing more than functional framing decision. A lot of times, there’s a lot going on that can be mounted visually within a frame to tell the story better. This isn’t really the case here; however, the shots do look strikingly beautiful. David Rosenbloom (The Insider) is the one who makes an earnest effort to further the storytelling devices through his efficient, sharp edit decisions. Letting the shots within the beginning and ending of a scene linger, there’s almost an attempt Rosenbloom’s making to allow us to involve ourselves to a scene. Junkie XL (Mad Max: Fury Road) is an otherwise terrific music composer-producer who unfortunately creates something extremely generic and template-like for most scenes.

I have make-up on me! Surprise!

To Perform or Not to Perform

Johnny Depp is a solid actor. I know it. It’s just that most of he roles he chooses allows him to tilt more toward the outward than the inward. Depp does make a convincing enough attempt to pull off Bulger’s persona, and has a few scenes where he’s definitely able to pass through you like a knife. It’s still the make-up and prosthetics that manage to stand out more than him though. In more than some scenes, you’re rudely awakened to the reminder that he’s Johnny Depp, and not his character. This shouldn’t happen. When it comes to larger-than-life roles, you should never be able to feel that an actor is not his character; not for a single second. The moment you do, it marks an obvious failure on Depp’s part.

The people who do actually hold the show, however, are Joel Edgerton and Benedict Cumberbatch. The latter especially blows you away with how consistently and convincingly he handles his accent and makes it his own. There’s a certain calm and bodily freedom that manages to overpower the otherwise redundant socially-inept-clever-guy image that he’s managed to create – and keep – with television’s Sherlock and, more recently, The Imitation Game. Edgerton, on the other hand, with his confident swagger and cocky smile, manages to pull you into his character, making him miles more multidimensional than Bulger’s. Dakota Johnson is great, but stays for an extremely short while. Ditto for Kevin Bacon and Corey Stoll; strong performers who are wasted. David Harbour is efficient.

Worth it?

Is the film bad? No it’s not. It’s a moderately made, if derivative, movie. It, however, fails to manipulate us to either empathize, or even become a vague part of their world. The viewers are but spectators of a drama that cannot seem too inviting for more than a quarter of the film’s runtime, Despite some of the most solid performances in the form of Edgerton, Cumberbatch and Johnson, Depp’s moderate performance and distracting physical appearance that seems almost distinguishable from the self doesn’t seem to help much, considering this – after all – is his film.

“Hidden inside [Black Mass] was a great movie”, Bill candidly remarked as we trailed out of the cinemas. I smiled in agreement to myself for a split-second, and then turned to add, “A great movie that was desperately screaming for help to get out, but was unfortunately suffocated to death.”

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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