Bridge of Spies

Here’s why we love cinema!


Bridge of Spies

  • Here’s why we love cinema!

Bridge of Spies

  • Here’s why we love cinema!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Tom Hanks
Amy Ryan
Mark Rylance
Scott Shepherd
Sebastian Koch

Written by

Matt Charman
Ethan Coen
Joel Coen

Directed by

Steven Spielberg



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What to Expect

If Steven Spielberg could make something as small as a made-for-television film (Duel) with a surprising amount of focus, it would come as no surprise that – with a bigger platform – he’d do much better.

Which is why Bridge of Spies has been one of the most definitive films in the most-awaited list of movie buffs this year. Collaborating with actor Tom Hanks once again after such successes as Saving Private Ryan, among a few others, Spielberg seems ready to give us the cinema we deserve.

Considering Lincoln, however, one’d know he always has been.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, the film takes us back to the Cold War, when an exchange is made between two governments – one, having captured pilot Gary Powers, and the other having captured suspected Soviet spy Rudolf Abel. In the mix is family man – and otherwise insurance lawyer – James Donovan (Hanks), who takes up a first-of-its-kind case by defending Abel, against all odds.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Will it help?

“Will it help?”

A suspicious painter lives alone in his hotel room. We see him reflecting upon something. As the camera, however, zooms out from a close-up to a mid-shot, the metaphorical becomes the literal; Rudolf Abel (as he’s to be known later in the film) is indeed looking at his reflection, if only to paint a portrait of himself. If there’s anything that excellently portrays his loner’s life, having only himself to look up to, it is this.

Scenes such as this one are as equally powerful and symbolic as the talk-heavy ones here – and to be honest, there’s a lot of dialogue in here. The writing here, however, ensures that any conversation between two or more people remains powerful, promising to draw the audience in with each word.

Spielberg’s regular cinematographic collaborator Janusz Kamiński continues to prove to us why the two are still an incredible team. The delicate framing and the old school camera operations make this a gorgeous film to watch. That’s not to say the visual cues are just eye candy; they’re a lot more. There are, for an example, many scenes where two people with equal conversational power are shot being on either side of the frame, depicting perfectly that the people involved are looking directly at each other, instead of each looking down at (or up to) the other. There’s a sense of satisfaction when you see scenes like these, symbolizing a lot more than your normally framed shot.

A Traitor and Other Tense Situations

A Traitor and Other Tense Situations

That’s not to say that there aren’t scenes depicting power. You’re shown a fantastic scene where Abel reminisces about a man and his parallel with Donovan. Donovan stands, as Abel looks up to him and approvingly calls out the following phrase (indirectly) to Donovan: “Standing Man.” Rudolf looks up to James. And standing there, James feels helpless between his country and his understanding of Abel’s ideals.

There’s an obvious amount of attention to detail when it comes to the small things; not so much the physical production design (which is unsurprisingly perfect) as they are the emotional. Bringing out the best of James relationships with his family and Abel, and his moral dilemma, Spielberg allows Hanks, as usual, to make his character flourish. We feel for him. We feel for his family. We want him succeed at every step of the way. There’s a very basic amount of vulnerability that makes him human; someone we can all relate to. And that, on its own, is an immense achievement.

If there’s anything that’s been able to tie a knot to every single compelling scene, however, it’s the music of the incredibly talented Thomas Newman. From the tense to the mellow, Newman knows his way around his orchestration of strings and other gorgeously mixed instruments (the trademark reverb is ever-present, and still successful at breaking hearts).

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tom Hanks stars as James Donovan in the incredible story of an ordinary man placed in extraordinary circumstances in DreamWorks Pictures/Fox 2000 PIctures' dramatic thriller BRIDGE OF SPIES, directed by Steven Spielberg.

Road to Performance

Tom Hanks is a powerhouse performer, and his act as Donovan proves to us that he can hold an audience together in awe even today. Supporting him are two key characters: Abel, played with utmost conviction by Mark Rylance, and Donovan’s wife, performed by Amy Ryan. While the former completely dives into Rudolf’s unnerving calm, the latter provides a very strong emotional balance to the film, despite the short runtime of her role. One mustn’t rule out Scott Shepherd, who’s able to perfectly balance frustration, incredulity and power in a single scene, without jerky, artificial transitions. And there’s also Sebastian Koch (A Good Day to Die Hard) who’s pretty powerful as lawyer Vogel, despite his presence in a lesser role than he deserves.

Worth it?

Evocatively written by the Coens (Joel and Ethan) and Mat Charman, Bridge of Spies is blessed with gorgeous cinematography, pitch perfect performances and Spielberg’s unsurprisingly masterful direction. Touching the varied ideologies of privilege, rights and image among thousands of others, the film manages to put itself together with élan. This, dare I say, isn’t just one of the best films this year, but also a film that reminds us just why we love to watch movies.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Tom Hanks
Amy Ryan
Mark Rylance
Scott Shepherd
Sebastian Koch

Written by

Matt Charman
Ethan Coen
Joel Coen

Directed by

Steven Spielberg



What to Expect

If Steven Spielberg could make something as small as a made-for-television film (Duel) with a surprising amount of focus, it would come as no surprise that – with a bigger platform – he’d do much better.

Which is why Bridge of Spies has been one of the most definitive films in the most-awaited list of movie buffs this year. Collaborating with actor Tom Hanks once again after such successes as Saving Private Ryan, among a few others, Spielberg seems ready to give us the cinema we deserve.

Considering Lincoln, however, one’d know he always has been.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, the film takes us back to the Cold War, when an exchange is made between two governments – one, having captured pilot Gary Powers, and the other having captured suspected Soviet spy Rudolf Abel. In the mix is family man – and otherwise insurance lawyer – James Donovan (Hanks), who takes up a first-of-its-kind case by defending Abel, against all odds.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Will it help?

“Will it help?”

A suspicious painter lives alone in his hotel room. We see him reflecting upon something. As the camera, however, zooms out from a close-up to a mid-shot, the metaphorical becomes the literal; Rudolf Abel (as he’s to be known later in the film) is indeed looking at his reflection, if only to paint a portrait of himself. If there’s anything that excellently portrays his loner’s life, having only himself to look up to, it is this.

Scenes such as this one are as equally powerful and symbolic as the talk-heavy ones here – and to be honest, there’s a lot of dialogue in here. The writing here, however, ensures that any conversation between two or more people remains powerful, promising to draw the audience in with each word.

Spielberg’s regular cinematographic collaborator Janusz Kamiński continues to prove to us why the two are still an incredible team. The delicate framing and the old school camera operations make this a gorgeous film to watch. That’s not to say the visual cues are just eye candy; they’re a lot more. There are, for an example, many scenes where two people with equal conversational power are shot being on either side of the frame, depicting perfectly that the people involved are looking directly at each other, instead of each looking down at (or up to) the other. There’s a sense of satisfaction when you see scenes like these, symbolizing a lot more than your normally framed shot.

A Traitor and Other Tense Situations

A Traitor and Other Tense Situations

That’s not to say that there aren’t scenes depicting power. You’re shown a fantastic scene where Abel reminisces about a man and his parallel with Donovan. Donovan stands, as Abel looks up to him and approvingly calls out the following phrase (indirectly) to Donovan: “Standing Man.” Rudolf looks up to James. And standing there, James feels helpless between his country and his understanding of Abel’s ideals.

There’s an obvious amount of attention to detail when it comes to the small things; not so much the physical production design (which is unsurprisingly perfect) as they are the emotional. Bringing out the best of James relationships with his family and Abel, and his moral dilemma, Spielberg allows Hanks, as usual, to make his character flourish. We feel for him. We feel for his family. We want him succeed at every step of the way. There’s a very basic amount of vulnerability that makes him human; someone we can all relate to. And that, on its own, is an immense achievement.

If there’s anything that’s been able to tie a knot to every single compelling scene, however, it’s the music of the incredibly talented Thomas Newman. From the tense to the mellow, Newman knows his way around his orchestration of strings and other gorgeously mixed instruments (the trademark reverb is ever-present, and still successful at breaking hearts).

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tom Hanks stars as James Donovan in the incredible story of an ordinary man placed in extraordinary circumstances in DreamWorks Pictures/Fox 2000 PIctures' dramatic thriller BRIDGE OF SPIES, directed by Steven Spielberg.

Road to Performance

Tom Hanks is a powerhouse performer, and his act as Donovan proves to us that he can hold an audience together in awe even today. Supporting him are two key characters: Abel, played with utmost conviction by Mark Rylance, and Donovan’s wife, performed by Amy Ryan. While the former completely dives into Rudolf’s unnerving calm, the latter provides a very strong emotional balance to the film, despite the short runtime of her role. One mustn’t rule out Scott Shepherd, who’s able to perfectly balance frustration, incredulity and power in a single scene, without jerky, artificial transitions. And there’s also Sebastian Koch (A Good Day to Die Hard) who’s pretty powerful as lawyer Vogel, despite his presence in a lesser role than he deserves.

Worth it?

Evocatively written by the Coens (Joel and Ethan) and Mat Charman, Bridge of Spies is blessed with gorgeous cinematography, pitch perfect performances and Spielberg’s unsurprisingly masterful direction. Touching the varied ideologies of privilege, rights and image among thousands of others, the film manages to put itself together with élan. This, dare I say, isn’t just one of the best films this year, but also a film that reminds us just why we love to watch movies.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Tom Hanks
Mark Rylance
Amy Ryan
Director Steven Spielberg
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

What to Expect

Hanks and Spielberg. Period.

Hanks and Spielberg. Period.

If Steven Spielberg could make something as small as a made-for-television film (Duel) with a surprising amount of focus, it would come as no surprise that – with a bigger platform – he’d do much better.

Which is why Bridge of Spies has been one of the most definitive films in the most-awaited list of movie buffs this year. Collaborating with actor Tom Hanks once again after such successes as Saving Private Ryan, among a few others, Spielberg seems ready to give us the cinema we deserve.

Considering Lincoln, however, one’d know he always has been.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, the film takes us back to the Cold War, when an exchange is made between two governments – one, having captured pilot Gary Powers, and the other having captured suspected Soviet spy Rudolf Abel. In the mix is family man – and otherwise insurance lawyer – James Donovan (Hanks), who takes up a first-of-its-kind case by defending Abel, against all odds.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Will it help?

“Will it help?”

A suspicious painter lives alone in his hotel room. We see him reflecting upon something. As the camera, however, zooms out from a close-up to a mid-shot, the metaphorical becomes the literal; Rudolf Abel (as he’s to be known later in the film) is indeed looking at his reflection, if only to paint a portrait of himself. If there’s anything that excellently portrays his loner’s life, having only himself to look up to, it is this.

Scenes such as this one are as equally powerful and symbolic as the talk-heavy ones here – and to be honest, there’s a lot of dialogue in here. The writing here, however, ensures that any conversation between two or more people remains powerful, promising to draw the audience in with each word.

Spielberg’s regular cinematographic collaborator Janusz Kamiński continues to prove to us why the two are still an incredible team. The delicate framing and the old school camera operations make this a gorgeous film to watch. That’s not to say the visual cues are just eye candy; they’re a lot more. There are, for an example, many scenes where two people with equal conversational power are shot being on either side of the frame, depicting perfectly that the people involved are looking directly at each other, instead of each looking down at (or up to) the other. There’s a sense of satisfaction when you see scenes like these, symbolizing a lot more than your normally framed shot.

A Traitor and Other Tense Situations

A Traitor and Other Tense Situations

That’s not to say that there aren’t scenes depicting power. You’re shown a fantastic scene where Abel reminisces about a man and his parallel with Donovan. Donovan stands, as Abel looks up to him and approvingly calls out the following phrase (indirectly) to Donovan: “Standing Man.” Rudolf looks up to James. And standing there, James feels helpless between his country and his understanding of Abel’s ideals.

There’s an obvious amount of attention to detail when it comes to the small things; not so much the physical production design (which is unsurprisingly perfect) as they are the emotional. Bringing out the best of James relationships with his family and Abel, and his moral dilemma, Spielberg allows Hanks, as usual, to make his character flourish. We feel for him. We feel for his family. We want him succeed at every step of the way. There’s a very basic amount of vulnerability that makes him human; someone we can all relate to. And that, on its own, is an immense achievement.

If there’s anything that’s been able to tie a knot to every single compelling scene, however, it’s the music of the incredibly talented Thomas Newman. From the tense to the mellow, Newman knows his way around his orchestration of strings and other gorgeously mixed instruments (the trademark reverb is ever-present, and still successful at breaking hearts).

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tom Hanks stars as James Donovan in the incredible story of an ordinary man placed in extraordinary circumstances in DreamWorks Pictures/Fox 2000 PIctures' dramatic thriller BRIDGE OF SPIES, directed by Steven Spielberg.

Road to Performance

Tom Hanks is a powerhouse performer, and his act as Donovan proves to us that he can hold an audience together in awe even today. Supporting him are two key characters: Abel, played with utmost conviction by Mark Rylance, and Donovan’s wife, performed by Amy Ryan. While the former completely dives into Rudolf’s unnerving calm, the latter provides a very strong emotional balance to the film, despite the short runtime of her role. One mustn’t rule out Scott Shepherd, who’s able to perfectly balance frustration, incredulity and power in a single scene, without jerky, artificial transitions. And there’s also Sebastian Koch (A Good Day to Die Hard) who’s pretty powerful as lawyer Vogel, despite his presence in a lesser role than he deserves.

Worth it?

Evocatively written by the Coens (Joel and Ethan) and Mat Charman, Bridge of Spies is blessed with gorgeous cinematography, pitch perfect performances and Spielberg’s unsurprisingly masterful direction. Touching the varied ideologies of privilege, rights and image among thousands of others, the film manages to put itself together with élan. This, dare I say, isn’t just one of the best films this year, but also a film that reminds us just why we love to watch movies.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Tom Hanks
Mark Rylance
Amy Ryan
Director Steven Spielberg
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

What to Expect

If Steven Spielberg could make something as small as a made-for-television film (Duel) with a surprising amount of focus, it would come as no surprise that – with a bigger platform – he’d do much better.

Which is why Bridge of Spies has been one of the most definitive films in the most-awaited list of movie buffs this year. Collaborating with actor Tom Hanks once again after such successes as Saving Private Ryan, among a few others, Spielberg seems ready to give us the cinema we deserve.

Considering Lincoln, however, one’d know he always has been.

What’s it About?

Based on true events, the film takes us back to the Cold War, when an exchange is made between two governments – one, having captured pilot Gary Powers, and the other having captured suspected Soviet spy Rudolf Abel. In the mix is family man – and otherwise insurance lawyer – James Donovan (Hanks), who takes up a first-of-its-kind case by defending Abel, against all odds.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A suspicious painter lives alone in his hotel room. We see him reflecting upon something. As the camera, however, zooms out from a close-up to a mid-shot, the metaphorical becomes the literal; Rudolf Abel (as he’s to be known later in the film) is indeed looking at his reflection, if only to paint a portrait of himself. If there’s anything that excellently portrays his loner’s life, having only himself to look up to, it is this.

Scenes such as this one are as equally powerful and symbolic as the talk-heavy ones here – and to be honest, there’s a lot of dialogue in here. The writing here, however, ensures that any conversation between two or more people remains powerful, promising to draw the audience in with each word.

Spielberg’s regular cinematographic collaborator Janusz Kamiński continues to prove to us why the two are still an incredible team. The delicate framing and the old school camera operations make this a gorgeous film to watch. That’s not to say the visual cues are just eye candy; they’re a lot more. There are, for an example, many scenes where two people with equal conversational power are shot being on either side of the frame, depicting perfectly that the people involved are looking directly at each other, instead of each looking down at (or up to) the other. There’s a sense of satisfaction when you see scenes like these, symbolizing a lot more than your normally framed shot.

A Traitor and Other Tense Situations

That’s not to say that there aren’t scenes depicting power. You’re shown a fantastic scene where Abel reminisces about a man and his parallel with Donovan. Donovan stands, as Abel looks up to him and approvingly calls out the following phrase (indirectly) to Donovan: “Standing Man.” Rudolf looks up to James. And standing there, James feels helpless between his country and his understanding of Abel’s ideals.

There’s an obvious amount of attention to detail when it comes to the small things; not so much the physical production design (which is unsurprisingly perfect) as they are the emotional. Bringing out the best of James relationships with his family and Abel, and his moral dilemma, Spielberg allows Hanks, as usual, to make his character flourish. We feel for him. We feel for his family. We want him succeed at every step of the way. There’s a very basic amount of vulnerability that makes him human; someone we can all relate to. And that, on its own, is an immense achievement.

If there’s anything that’s been able to tie a knot to every single compelling scene, however, it’s the music of the incredibly talented Thomas Newman. From the tense to the mellow, Newman knows his way around his orchestration of strings and other gorgeously mixed instruments (the trademark reverb is ever-present, and still successful at breaking hearts).

Road to Performance

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tom Hanks is a powerhouse performer, and his act as Donovan proves to us that he can hold an audience together in awe even today. Supporting him are two key characters: Abel, played with utmost conviction by Mark Rylance, and Donovan’s wife, performed by Amy Ryan. While the former completely dives into Rudolf’s unnerving calm, the latter provides a very strong emotional balance to the film, despite the short runtime of her role. One mustn’t rule out Scott Shepherd, who’s able to perfectly balance frustration, incredulity and power in a single scene, without jerky, artificial transitions. And there’s also Sebastian Koch (A Good Day to Die Hard) who’s pretty powerful as lawyer Vogel, despite his presence in a lesser role than he deserves.

Worth it?

Evocatively written by the Coens (Joel and Ethan) and Mat Charman, Bridge of Spies is blessed with gorgeous cinematography, pitch perfect performances and Spielberg’s unsurprisingly masterful direction. Touching the varied ideologies of privilege, rights and image among thousands of others, the film manages to put itself together with élan. This dare I say, isn’t just one of the best films this year, but also a film that reminds us just why we love to watch movies.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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