Brooklyn

Imminently watchable


Brooklyn

  • Imminently watchable

Brooklyn

  • Imminently watchable


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Saoirse Ronan
Jim Broadbent
Emory Cohen
Domhnall Gleeson
Fiona Glascott

Written by

Nick Hornby
Colm Tóibín

Directed by

John Crowley




What to Expect

A young girl falls in love, and gets inadvertently caught in a triangle involving another guy having feelings for her. That’s Brooklyn for you, and the trailers basically inform that to you. But are the trailers all that you need to see to know what the movie’s about?

One probably needs to understand that when it comes to marketing a movie, it’s very important for the team to drive the most audience to the big screen. Of course, one needs to know if the film is a lot more than it shows it is, and for that, you’d only be able to know what exactly it narrates when you grab that ticket to watch the film.

Adapted to screen by Nick Hornby (best known for transforming his own novel High Fidelity into a fantastic film screenplay), and starring the talented Saoirse Ronan and Domnhall Gleeson, the film, despite the hurdle of a rather basic trailer, holds a lot of promise. Now, one only need wonder if it delivers.

What’s it About?

Ellis (Ronan) is arranged for by her sister Rose (Fiona Glascott) to get out of the small town of Enniscorthy in Ireland to a better life and career opportunity in Brooklyn. Here is where she falls for Anthony, and flourishes in her job. But when tragedy strikes, forcing her to go back to her roots, she questions where her life really matters.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

For the love of one

For the love of one

Brooklyn is not made to move your soul; that would be an imperative when it comes to understanding where one’s expectations of the movie must lie. It’s not a heartbreaking account of a protagonist, nor does it explicitly want you to empathize for the character. What it does for its audience is very simple: it talks about outsiders. Viewers are given an account of a very specific kind of outsider — Ellis isn’t exactly the kind of young woman to fit into Enniscorthy’s societal construct, but she might not necessarily feel quite immediately at home in Brooklyn either.

And that is, quite succinctly, what makes the film so relevant to a lot of people.

On a more subtle note, this film does manage to strike a very particular chord with human beings who’re incredibly torn about where they’re from, where they are, and how they identify themselves. This is what makes Ellis such a wonderful example of the many different kinds of people who constantly question where is it that they can truly call home. “Is it here, where I live? Is it where I’m ancestrally from? Where is it that I can find the peace of never being able to go away from?”. The movie tackles many more of such questions within the construct of a conventional period drama. This, to me, calls for a pretty commendable attempt.

And the attraction for another

And the attraction for another

One of the major nitpicks this film will generate among viewers is its lack of difference from other conventional period dramas. The narrative of Brooklyn consists of the usual checklist which includes the setup, the evolution, the conflict, the dramatic observation of the conflict and how the film’s protagonist bravely resolves it, redeeming themselves. Sure, some might direct the fault at Colm Tóibín — he’s the one who wrote the novel that turned into the source material for this movie, by the way — but a film adaptation is usually favored by the fact that the source material can be moulded to possibly anything.

Despite these issues (which also include the ending, which is a tad abrupt), the film is arguably very classic in narrative, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. There’s a smoothness in its flow, and most of the developments the characters are going aren’t abrupt; the transitions seem almost organic. Michael Brook’s score further bring’s the film alive, and Yves Bélanger’s cinematography helps director John Crowley’s vision of a rather gorgeous looking film. (He has, after all, directed a few episodes from the first season of True Detective, so we’re rest assured he has a keen eye for making a visually authentic film). Add to that the quaint production design, and we have a movie that looks perfect, and is technically well made.

Let’s thank our stars, however, that it doesn’t exactly stop at that.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Who am I?

Who am I?

Saoirse Ronan brings about a certain personality to her performance as Ellis. She’s fantastic, and has a body language that speaks more than dialogue can. Her mixture of vulnerability and bravado converts her protagonist into a fascinating three-dimensional character who understands perfectly her place in society and what she intends to do with life. Emory Cohen is the fairly classic Italian-American, but his effervescent charm spreads throughout the entire screen when he’s around. He’s a fantastic presence and can pull off the ticks he’s taken up to enact quite well. Domhnall Gleeson is beautifully restrained while he’s around. In her rather short role, Fiona Glascott’s performance is quite powerful. Jim Broadbent as the warm-hearted Father Flood is both effective and unobtrusive while Brin Brennan’s antagonizing take is on point. The others are efficient.

Worth it?

There are many things about Brooklyn that work, and make up for the few that don’t. The film isn’t exactly perfect, but it’s beautiful enough to draw viewers in and fascinate them with the choices its female protagonist is given in life, and how she chooses to tackle them. It’s not flawless, sure, but it’s an impressive, imminently watchable film that needs to be given a shot. And if there’s nothing that draws you in, the rather pointed questions of identity, independence and a sense of belonging it answers is one definite reason to give the film a try.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Saoirse Ronan
Jim Broadbent
Emory Cohen
Domhnall Gleeson
Fiona Glascott

Written by

Nick Hornby
Colm Tóibín

Directed by

John Crowley




What to Expect

A young girl falls in love, and gets inadvertently caught in a triangle involving another guy having feelings for her. That’s Brooklyn for you, and the trailers basically inform that to you. But are the trailers all that you need to see to know what the movie’s about?

One probably needs to understand that when it comes to marketing a movie, it’s very important for the team to drive the most audience to the big screen. Of course, one needs to know if the film is a lot more than it shows it is, and for that, you’d only be able to know what exactly it narrates when you grab that ticket to watch the film.

Adapted to screen by Nick Hornby (best known for transforming his own novel High Fidelity into a fantastic film screenplay), and starring the talented Saoirse Ronan and Domnhall Gleeson, the film, despite the hurdle of a rather basic trailer, holds a lot of promise. Now, one only need wonder if it delivers.

What’s it About?

Ellis (Ronan) is arranged for by her sister Rose (Fiona Glascott) to get out of the small town of Enniscorthy in Ireland to a better life and career opportunity in Brooklyn. Here is where she falls for Anthony, and flourishes in her job. But when tragedy strikes, forcing her to go back to her roots, she questions where her life really matters.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

For the love of one

For the love of one

Brooklyn is not made to move your soul; that would be an imperative when it comes to understanding where one’s expectations of the movie must lie. It’s not a heartbreaking account of a protagonist, nor does it explicitly want you to empathize for the character. What it does for its audience is very simple: it talks about outsiders. Viewers are given an account of a very specific kind of outsider — Ellis isn’t exactly the kind of young woman to fit into Enniscorthy’s societal construct, but she might not necessarily feel quite immediately at home in Brooklyn either.

And that is, quite succinctly, what makes the film so relevant to a lot of people.

On a more subtle note, this film does manage to strike a very particular chord with human beings who’re incredibly torn about where they’re from, where they are, and how they identify themselves. This is what makes Ellis such a wonderful example of the many different kinds of people who constantly question where is it that they can truly call home. “Is it here, where I live? Is it where I’m ancestrally from? Where is it that I can find the peace of never being able to go away from?”. The movie tackles many more of such questions within the construct of a conventional period drama. This, to me, calls for a pretty commendable attempt.

And the attraction for another

And the attraction for another

One of the major nitpicks this film will generate among viewers is its lack of difference from other conventional period dramas. The narrative of Brooklyn consists of the usual checklist which includes the setup, the evolution, the conflict, the dramatic observation of the conflict and how the film’s protagonist bravely resolves it, redeeming themselves. Sure, some might direct the fault at Colm Tóibín — he’s the one who wrote the novel that turned into the source material for this movie, by the way — but a film adaptation is usually favored by the fact that the source material can be moulded to possibly anything.

Despite these issues (which also include the ending, which is a tad abrupt), the film is arguably very classic in narrative, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. There’s a smoothness in its flow, and most of the developments the characters are going aren’t abrupt; the transitions seem almost organic. Michael Brook’s score further bring’s the film alive, and Yves Bélanger’s cinematography helps director John Crowley’s vision of a rather gorgeous looking film. (He has, after all, directed a few episodes from the first season of True Detective, so we’re rest assured he has a keen eye for making a visually authentic film). Add to that the quaint production design, and we have a movie that looks perfect, and is technically well made.

Let’s thank our stars, however, that it doesn’t exactly stop at that.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Who am I?

Who am I?

Saoirse Ronan brings about a certain personality to her performance as Ellis. She’s fantastic, and has a body language that speaks more than dialogue can. Her mixture of vulnerability and bravado converts her protagonist into a fascinating three-dimensional character who understands perfectly her place in society and what she intends to do with life. Emory Cohen is the fairly classic Italian-American, but his effervescent charm spreads throughout the entire screen when he’s around. He’s a fantastic presence and can pull off the ticks he’s taken up to enact quite well. Domhnall Gleeson is beautifully restrained while he’s around. In her rather short role, Fiona Glascott’s performance is quite powerful. Jim Broadbent as the warm-hearted Father Flood is both effective and unobtrusive while Brin Brennan’s antagonizing take is on point. The others are efficient.

Worth it?

There are many things about Brooklyn that work, and make up for the few that don’t. The film isn’t exactly perfect, but it’s beautiful enough to draw viewers in and fascinate them with the choices its female protagonist is given in life, and how she chooses to tackle them. It’s not flawless, sure, but it’s an impressive, imminently watchable film that needs to be given a shot. And if there’s nothing that draws you in, the rather pointed questions of identity, independence and a sense of belonging it answers is one definite reason to give the film a try.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Saoirse Ronan
Emory Cohen
Domhnall Gleeson
Director John Crowley
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

A young girl falls in love, and gets inadvertently caught in a triangle involving another guy having feelings for her. That’s Brooklyn for you, and the trailers basically inform that to you. But are the trailers all that you need to see to know what the movie’s about?

One probably needs to understand that when it comes to marketing a movie, it’s very important for the team to drive the most audience to the big screen. Of course, one needs to know if the film is a lot more than it shows it is, and for that, you’d only be able to know what exactly it narrates when you grab that ticket to watch the film.

Adapted to screen by Nick Hornby (best known for transforming his own novel High Fidelity into a fantastic film screenplay), and starring the talented Saoirse Ronan and Domnhall Gleeson, the film, despite the hurdle of a rather basic trailer, holds a lot of promise. Now, one only need wonder if it delivers.

What’s it About?

Ellis (Ronan) is arranged for by her sister Rose (Fiona Glascott) to get out of the small town of Enniscorthy in Ireland to a better life and career opportunity in Brooklyn. Here is where she falls for Anthony, and flourishes in her job. But when tragedy strikes, forcing her to go back to her roots, she questions where her life really matters.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

For the love of one

For the love of one

Brooklyn is not made to move your soul; that would be an imperative when it comes to understanding where one’s expectations of the movie must lie. It’s not a heartbreaking account of a protagonist, nor does it explicitly want you to empathize for the character. What it does for its audience is very simple: it talks about outsiders. Viewers are given an account of a very specific kind of outsider — Ellis isn’t exactly the kind of young woman to fit into Enniscorthy’s societal construct, but she might not necessarily feel quite immediately at home in Brooklyn either.

And that is, quite succinctly, what makes the film so relevant to a lot of people.

On a more subtle note, this film does manage to strike a very particular chord with human beings who’re incredibly torn about where they’re from, where they are, and how they identify themselves. This is what makes Ellis such a wonderful example of the many different kinds of people who constantly question where is it that they can truly call home. “Is it here, where I live? Is it where I’m ancestrally from? Where is it that I can find the peace of never being able to go away from?”. The movie tackles many more of such questions within the construct of a conventional period drama. This, to me, calls for a pretty commendable attempt.

And the attraction for another

And the attraction for another

One of the major nitpicks this film will generate among viewers is its lack of difference from other conventional period dramas. The narrative of Brooklyn consists of the usual checklist which includes the setup, the evolution, the conflict, the dramatic observation of the conflict and how the film’s protagonist bravely resolves it, redeeming themselves. Sure, some might direct the fault at Colm Tóibín — he’s the one who wrote the novel that turned into the source material for this movie, by the way — but a film adaptation is usually favored by the fact that the source material can be moulded to possibly anything.

Despite these issues (which also include the ending, which is a tad abrupt), the film is arguably very classic in narrative, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. There’s a smoothness in its flow, and most of the developments the characters are going aren’t abrupt; the transitions seem almost organic. Michael Brook’s score further bring’s the film alive, and Yves Bélanger’s cinematography helps director John Crowley’s vision of a rather gorgeous looking film. (He has, after all, directed a few episodes from the first season of True Detective, so we’re rest assured he has a keen eye for making a visually authentic film). Add to that the quaint production design, and we have a movie that looks perfect, and is technically well made.

Let’s thank our stars, however, that it doesn’t exactly stop at that.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Who am I?

Who am I?

Saoirse Ronan brings about a certain personality to her performance as Ellis. She’s fantastic, and has a body language that speaks more than dialogue can. Her mixture of vulnerability and bravado converts her protagonist into a fascinating three-dimensional character who understands perfectly her place in society and what she intends to do with life. Emory Cohen is the fairly classic Italian-American, but his effervescent charm spreads throughout the entire screen when he’s around. He’s a fantastic presence and can pull off the ticks he’s taken up to enact quite well. Domhnall Gleeson is beautifully restrained while he’s around. In her rather short role, Fiona Glascott’s performance is quite powerful. Jim Broadbent as the warm-hearted Father Flood is both effective and unobtrusive while Brin Brennan’s antagonizing take is on point. The others are efficient.

Worth it?

There are many things about Brooklyn that work, and make up for the few that don’t. The film isn’t exactly perfect, but it’s beautiful enough to draw viewers in and fascinate them with the choices its female protagonist is given in life, and how she chooses to tackle them. It’s not flawless, sure, but it’s an impressive, imminently watchable film that needs to be given a shot. And if there’s nothing that draws you in, the rather pointed questions of identity, independence and a sense of belonging it answers is one definite reason to give the film a try.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Saoirse Ronan
Emory Cohen
Domhnall Gleeson
Director John Crowley
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

A young girl falls in love, and gets inadvertently caught in a triangle involving another guy having feelings for her. That’s Brooklyn for you, and the trailers basically inform that to you. But are the trailers all that you need to see to know what the movie’s about?

One probably needs to understand that when it comes to marketing a movie, it’s very important for the team to drive the most audience to the big screen. Of course, one needs to know if the film is a lot more than it shows it is, and for that, you’d only be able to know what exactly it narrates when you grab that ticket to watch the film.

Adapted to screen by Nick Hornby (best known for transforming his own novel High Fidelity into a fantastic film screenplay), and starring the talented Saoirse Ronan and Domnhall Gleeson, the film, despite the hurdle of a rather basic trailer, holds a lot of promise. Now, one only need wonder if it delivers.

What’s it About?

Ellis (Ronan) is arranged for by her sister Rose (Fiona Glascott) to get out of the small town of Enniscorthy in Ireland to a better life and career opportunity in Brooklyn. Here is where she falls for Anthony, and flourishes in her job. But when tragedy strikes, forcing her to go back to her roots, she questions where her life really matters.

For the love of one

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Brooklyn is not made to move your soul; that would be an imperative when it comes to understanding where one’s expectations of the movie must lie. It’s not a heartbreaking account of a protagonist, nor does it explicitly want you to empathize for the character. What it does for its audience is very simple: it talks about outsiders. Viewers are given an account of a very specific kind of outsider — Ellis isn’t exactly the kind of young woman to fit into Enniscorthy’s societal construct, but she might not necessarily feel quite immediately at home in Brooklyn either.

And that is, quite succinctly, what makes the film so relevant to a lot of people.

On a more subtle note, this film does manage to strike a very particular chord with human beings who’re incredibly torn about where they’re from, where they are, and how they identify themselves. This is what makes Ellis such a wonderful example of the many different kinds of people who constantly question where is it that they can truly call home. “Is it here, where I live? Is it where I’m ancestrally from? Where is it that I can find the peace of never being able to go away from?”. The movie tackles many more of such questions within the construct of a conventional period drama. This, to me, calls for a pretty commendable attempt.

And the attraction for another

One of the major nitpicks this film will generate among viewers is its lack of difference from other conventional period dramas. The narrative of Brooklyn consists of the usual checklist which includes the setup, the evolution, the conflict, the dramatic observation of the conflict and how the film’s protagonist bravely resolves it, redeeming themselves. Sure, some might direct the fault at Colm Tóibín — he’s the one who wrote the novel that turned into the source material for this movie, by the way — but a film adaptation is usually favored by the fact that the source material can be moulded to possibly anything.

Despite these issues (which also include the ending, which is a tad abrupt), the film is arguably very classic in narrative, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. There’s a smoothness in its flow, and most of the developments the characters are going aren’t abrupt; the transitions seem almost organic. Michael Brook’s score further bring’s the film alive, and Yves Bélanger’s cinematography helps director John Crowley’s vision of a rather gorgeous looking film. (He has, after all, directed a few episodes from the first season of True Detective, so we’re rest assured he has a keen eye for making a visually authentic film). Add to that the quaint production design, and we have a movie that looks perfect, and is technically well made.

Let’s thank our stars, however, that it doesn’t exactly stop at that.

Who am I?

To Perform or Not to Perform

Saoirse Ronan brings about a certain personality to her performance as Ellis. She’s fantastic, and has a body language that speaks more than dialogue can. Her mixture of vulnerability and bravado converts her protagonist into a fascinating three-dimensional character who understands perfectly her place in society and what she intends to do with life. Emory Cohen is the fairly classic Italian-American, but his effervescent charm spreads throughout the entire screen when he’s around. He’s a fantastic presence and can pull off the ticks he’s taken up to enact quite well. Domhnall Gleeson is beautifully restrained while he’s around. In her rather short role, Fiona Glascott’s performance is quite powerful. Jim Broadbent as the warm-hearted Father Flood is both effective and unobtrusive while Brin Brennan’s antagonizing take is on point. The others are efficient.

Worth it?

There are many things about Brooklyn that work, and make up for the few that don’t. The film isn’t exactly perfect, but it’s beautiful enough to draw viewers in and fascinate them with the choices its female protagonist is given in life, and how she chooses to tackle them. It’s not flawless, sure, but it’s an impressive, imminently watchable film that needs to be given a shot. And if there’s nothing that draws you in, the rather pointed questions of identity, independence and a sense of belonging it answers is one definite reason to give the film a try.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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