Brothers

You’re going to hate every minute of it!


Brothers

  • You’re going to hate every minute of it!

Brothers

  • You’re going to hate every minute of it!


Rated

NR

Starring

Akshay Kumar
Sidharth Malhotra
Jackie Shroff
Jacqueline Fernandes
Shefali Shah

Written by

Gavin O’Connor
Cliff Dorfman
Siddharth
Garima

Directed by

Karan Malhotra


coming up

What to Expect

So riddle me this: you buy the remake rights of an already formulaic film, dilute and dumb it down to the bare minimum semblance levels, insert an absolutely unnecessary song, score a jarring background score that only amplifies the unending melodrama, and have an insufferable first half – only to lead you into a rushed and underwhelming second half.

Quick question: WHY?

Brothers is an official remake of Gavin O’Connor’s critical-success-but-commercial-disaster Warrior, which I absolutely loved despite it the cliches, chiefly because of the solid performances by the cast led by the incredible Tom Hardy and the thrill of the rather brilliantly choreographed MMA sequences. Brothers on the other hand, accentuates the genre cliches and dilutes the strengths of the original, leading to an unimpressive finished product. While Warrior had a sense of honesty and was overall cathartic, Brothers strikes many false notes and appears manipulative. It is marketed as the ultimate showdown between two brothers and that seems to be the only motive here as it meanders its way through bumps and blocks to ultimately reach to the promised flash point. If those 20 minutes or so of MMA sequences are your fix, then this is your film, but if you’re looking for a wholesome film, stay away.

What’s it About?

A guilt ridden ex-street fighter and now ex-con Garson Fernandes (Jackie Shroff) returns to his haunting past and tries to reconcile with his estranged sons. One of them is an ex-fighter like him, but now works as a school teacher while the other one is mostly a wastrel who aspires to be a fighter but for failed reasons. David, (Akshay Kumar, Baby) the elder one, also moonlights as a street-fighter in illegal fights for some extra cash to support his family and an ailing daughter while the junior Fernandes, Monty (Sidharth Malhotra, Hasee To Phasee) is mostly struggling as a fighter and gets himself and his self-respect beaten down regularly. The emergence of a legal platform called R2F( Right to Fight) promoted as a sport gives both the brothers a shot at redemption, the former for money and the latter for recognition.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Warrior-Swag

Warrior-Swag

Let’s give credit where it’s due; Brothers has cast its players well. The principal cast puts up mostly assured performances, but that is where the credit ends as they are let down by a manipulative screenplay and lazy editing. The movie takes its own sweet time to set up the story and aims at establishing all the angles and motives in a rather elaborate and loud manner; subtlety is obviously not something it was aiming for. It’s quite apparent that, while on the writing table, a “genius” had that “Eureka!” moment wherein it dawned on them, that since they were going to remake a Hollywood film in India, they must simplify for the audience by explaining each and every motive and move. Director Karan Malhotra seems to be greatly inspired from Prakash Mehra and Manmohan Desai and likes to keep the melodrama quotient heavy, so much so that the first half of the film almost has its actors shedding tears and either crying (sometimes even howling) or moving around with long faces. Brothers clearly aims at your tear glands and wants you to cry your heart out for the ‘brothers’, the only problem being that the proceedings are shallow and never really make you care for them. Even the mandatory insertion of an ailing kid doesn’t quite cut the thick barrier to get to your heart strings. The end result is therefore superficial and uninspiring.

A major part of the film’s draw is the MMA sequences and while Brothers follows the order of the sequence from its original film, it misses the aggression that the original cast brought along and the  choreography is underwhelming in comparison. That part alone had the capability to lift the movie and would have made the audience forgive a majority of its follies. Alas! They’re as tepid as the rest of the movie. We keep hearing the words “techniques” and “abilities” for our ‘Brothers’ but fail to see those. I guess we were just supposed to believe what we hear rather than see and experience them for ourselves now, weren’t we?

While watching the film last night, when the movie suddenly breaks into the dance number featuring Kareena Kapoor Khan, I just sat there wondering what exactly was the purpose of this unnecessary, rather suggestively shot and choreographed song. Was there any need, at all, for this puerile addition? It made me further wonder if the audience would come to watch the movie only for this song. Or did the makers add it for relief from all of that heavy melodrama?, I continued to ponder. Needless to say, this particular addition put me off completely, and if it wasn’t for the intermission immediately afterwards, I would have walked out.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Much aggression. So amaze. Wow.

Much aggression. So amaze. Wow.

Among the actors, Akshay Kumar leads in a believable turn and fits the role perfectly. He matches the physique and is agile for the part. It also helps that he keeps the character vulnerable, putting a lid on the machismo. Sidharth Malhotra tries his best Unfortunately, he’s reprised (only tepidly) the role played spectacularly by Tom Hardy. Even if we forget the original performance, his aggression never quite hits home and the bravado and wins seem unconvincing and forced. Jackie Shroff reprises the role played by Nick Nolte in the original that led him to an Academy Award nomination. He tries for most parts to be sincere but goes over the board frequently and hams it up like there’s no tomorrow. Jacqueline Fernandes is sincere in her role and is aptly cast. Among the supporting cast an actor of Ashutosh Rana’s calibre is reduced to a joker, and the original role played by Frank Grillo kept coming back to my mind. The rest of the supporting cast are all too loud and mismatched just like the film is. My heart went out for the otherwise brilliant Shefali Shah who is made to shed tears in every scene, thereby being wasted in a series of whimpers.

Worth it?

If only action set-pieces are your thing, and if you don’t mind sitting through almost two hours and forty minutes of melodrama; if you don’t care much about anything else and, most of all, if you haven’t seen Warrior, then this movie is for you (Who are you? I wouldn’t want to know) but if you are looking for a wholesome film and – like me – have seen and liked the original, you’re going to hate every minute of it.

Now why do I keep harping on about Warrior and Tom Hardy, you ask. Here’s a tiny why: the scene in which Sidharth Malhotra’s character charges towards his opponent with his left arm stretched out is Malhotra replaying what Hardy did in Warrior. Try sourcing out both the scenes and you’ll know exactly what aggression on screen means, what a great actor does to a scene and how it elevates a movie single handedly.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

NR

Starring

Akshay Kumar
Sidharth Malhotra
Jackie Shroff
Jacqueline Fernandes
Shefali Shah

Written by

Gavin O’Connor
Cliff Dorfman
Siddharth
Garima

Directed by

Karan Malhotra


What to Expect

So riddle me this: you buy the remake rights of an already formulaic film, dilute and dumb it down to the bare minimum semblance levels, insert an absolutely unnecessary song, score a jarring background score that only amplifies the unending melodrama, and have an insufferable first half – only to lead you into a rushed and underwhelming second half.

Quick question: WHY?

Brothers is an official remake of Gavin O’Connor’s critical-success-but-commercial-disaster Warrior, which I absolutely loved despite it the cliches, chiefly because of the solid performances by the cast led by the incredible Tom Hardy and the thrill of the rather brilliantly choreographed MMA sequences. Brothers on the other hand, accentuates the genre cliches and dilutes the strengths of the original, leading to an unimpressive finished product. While Warrior had a sense of honesty and was overall cathartic, Brothers strikes many false notes and appears manipulative. It is marketed as the ultimate showdown between two brothers and that seems to be the only motive here as it meanders its way through bumps and blocks to ultimately reach to the promised flash point. If those 20 minutes or so of MMA sequences are your fix, then this is your film, but if you’re looking for a wholesome film, stay away.

What’s it About?

A guilt ridden ex-street fighter and now ex-con Garson Fernandes (Jackie Shroff) returns to his haunting past and tries to reconcile with his estranged sons. One of them is an ex-fighter like him, but now works as a school teacher while the other one is mostly a wastrel who aspires to be a fighter but for failed reasons. David, (Akshay Kumar, Baby) the elder one, also moonlights as a street-fighter in illegal fights for some extra cash to support his family and an ailing daughter while the junior Fernandes, Monty (Sidharth Malhotra, Hasee To Phasee) is mostly struggling as a fighter and gets himself and his self-respect beaten down regularly. The emergence of a legal platform called R2F( Right to Fight) promoted as a sport gives both the brothers a shot at redemption, the former for money and the latter for recognition.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Warrior-Swag

Warrior-Swag

Let’s give credit where it’s due; Brothers has cast its players well. The principal cast puts up mostly assured performances, but that is where the credit ends as they are let down by a manipulative screenplay and lazy editing. The movie takes its own sweet time to set up the story and aims at establishing all the angles and motives in a rather elaborate and loud manner; subtlety is obviously not something it was aiming for. It’s quite apparent that, while on the writing table, a “genius” had that “Eureka!” moment wherein it dawned on them, that since they were going to remake a Hollywood film in India, they must simplify for the audience by explaining each and every motive and move. Director Karan Malhotra seems to be greatly inspired from Prakash Mehra and Manmohan Desai and likes to keep the melodrama quotient heavy, so much so that the first half of the film almost has its actors shedding tears and either crying (sometimes even howling) or moving around with long faces. Brothers clearly aims at your tear glands and wants you to cry your heart out for the ‘brothers’, the only problem being that the proceedings are shallow and never really make you care for them. Even the mandatory insertion of an ailing kid doesn’t quite cut the thick barrier to get to your heart strings. The end result is therefore superficial and uninspiring.

A major part of the film’s draw is the MMA sequences and while Brothers follows the order of the sequence from its original film, it misses the aggression that the original cast brought along and the  choreography is underwhelming in comparison. That part alone had the capability to lift the movie and would have made the audience forgive a majority of its follies. Alas! They’re as tepid as the rest of the movie. We keep hearing the words “techniques” and “abilities” for our ‘Brothers’ but fail to see those. I guess we were just supposed to believe what we hear rather than see and experience them for ourselves now, weren’t we?

While watching the film last night, when the movie suddenly breaks into the dance number featuring Kareena Kapoor Khan, I just sat there wondering what exactly was the purpose of this unnecessary, rather suggestively shot and choreographed song. Was there any need, at all, for this puerile addition? It made me further wonder if the audience would come to watch the movie only for this song. Or did the makers add it for relief from all of that heavy melodrama?, I continued to ponder. Needless to say, this particular addition put me off completely, and if it wasn’t for the intermission immediately afterwards, I would have walked out.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Much aggression. So amaze. Wow.

Much aggression. So amaze. Wow.

Among the actors, Akshay Kumar leads in a believable turn and fits the role perfectly. He matches the physique and is agile for the part. It also helps that he keeps the character vulnerable, putting a lid on the machismo. Sidharth Malhotra tries his best Unfortunately, he’s reprised (only tepidly) the role played spectacularly by Tom Hardy. Even if we forget the original performance, his aggression never quite hits home and the bravado and wins seem unconvincing and forced. Jackie Shroff reprises the role played by Nick Nolte in the original that led him to an Academy Award nomination. He tries for most parts to be sincere but goes over the board frequently and hams it up like there’s no tomorrow. Jacqueline Fernandes is sincere in her role and is aptly cast. Among the supporting cast an actor of Ashutosh Rana’s calibre is reduced to a joker, and the original role played by Frank Grillo kept coming back to my mind. The rest of the supporting cast are all too loud and mismatched just like the film is. My heart went out for the otherwise brilliant Shefali Shah who is made to shed tears in every scene, thereby being wasted in a series of whimpers.

Worth it?

If only action set-pieces are your thing, and if you don’t mind sitting through almost two hours and forty minutes of melodrama; if you don’t care much about anything else and, most of all, if you haven’t seen Warrior, then this movie is for you (Who are you? I wouldn’t want to know) but if you are looking for a wholesome film and – like me – have seen and liked the original, you’re going to hate every minute of it.

Now why do I keep harping on about Warrior and Tom Hardy, you ask. Here’s a tiny why: the scene in which Sidharth Malhotra’s character charges towards his opponent with his left arm stretched out is Malhotra replaying what Hardy did in Warrior. Try sourcing out both the scenes and you’ll know exactly what aggression on screen means, what a great actor does to a scene and how it elevates a movie single handedly.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Akshay Kumar
Sidharth Malhotra
Jackie Shroff
Director Karan Malhotra
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

So riddle me this: you buy the remake rights of an already formulaic film, dilute and dumb it down to the bare minimum semblance levels, insert an absolutely unnecessary song, score a jarring background score that only amplifies the unending melodrama, and have an insufferable first half – only to lead you into a rushed and underwhelming second half.

Quick question: WHY?

Brothers is an official remake of Gavin O’Connor’s critical-success-but-commercial-disaster Warrior, which I absolutely loved despite it the cliches, chiefly because of the solid performances by the cast led by the incredible Tom Hardy and the thrill of the rather brilliantly choreographed MMA sequences. Brothers on the other hand, accentuates the genre cliches and dilutes the strengths of the original, leading to an unimpressive finished product. While Warrior had a sense of honesty and was overall cathartic, Brothers strikes many false notes and appears manipulative. It is marketed as the ultimate showdown between two brothers and that seems to be the only motive here as it meanders its way through bumps and blocks to ultimately reach to the promised flash point. If those 20 minutes or so of MMA sequences are your fix, then this is your film, but if you’re looking for a wholesome film, stay away.

What’s it About?

A guilt ridden ex-street fighter and now ex-con Garson Fernandes (Jackie Shroff) returns to his haunting past and tries to reconcile with his estranged sons. One of them is an ex-fighter like him, but now works as a school teacher while the other one is mostly a wastrel who aspires to be a fighter but for failed reasons. David, (Akshay Kumar, Baby) the elder one, also moonlights as a street-fighter in illegal fights for some extra cash to support his family and an ailing daughter while the junior Fernandes, Monty (Sidharth Malhotra, Hasee To Phasee) is mostly struggling as a fighter and gets himself and his self-respect beaten down regularly. The emergence of a legal platform called R2F( Right to Fight) promoted as a sport gives both the brothers a shot at redemption, the former for money and the latter for recognition.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Warrior-Swag

Warrior-Swag

Let’s give credit where it’s due; Brothers has cast its players well. The principal cast puts up mostly assured performances, but that is where the credit ends as they are let down by a manipulative screenplay and lazy editing. The movie takes its own sweet time to set up the story and aims at establishing all the angles and motives in a rather elaborate and loud manner; subtlety is obviously not something it was aiming for. It’s quite apparent that, while on the writing table, a “genius” had that “Eureka!” moment wherein it dawned on them, that since they were going to remake a Hollywood film in India, they must simplify for the audience by explaining each and every motive and move. Director Karan Malhotra seems to be greatly inspired from Prakash Mehra and Manmohan Desai and likes to keep the melodrama quotient heavy, so much so that the first half of the film almost has its actors shedding tears and either crying (sometimes even howling) or moving around with long faces. Brothers clearly aims at your tear glands and wants you to cry your heart out for the ‘brothers’, the only problem being that the proceedings are shallow and never really make you care for them. Even the mandatory insertion of an ailing kid doesn’t quite cut the thick barrier to get to your heart strings. The end result is therefore superficial and uninspiring.

A major part of the film’s draw is the MMA sequences and while Brothers follows the order of the sequence from its original film, it misses the aggression that the original cast brought along and the  choreography is underwhelming in comparison. That part alone had the capability to lift the movie and would have made the audience forgive a majority of its follies. Alas! They’re as tepid as the rest of the movie. We keep hearing the words “techniques” and “abilities” for our ‘Brothers’ but fail to see those. I guess we were just supposed to believe what we hear rather than see and experience them for ourselves now, weren’t we?

While watching the film last night, when the movie suddenly breaks into the dance number featuring Kareena Kapoor Khan, I just sat there wondering what exactly was the purpose of this unnecessary, rather suggestively shot and choreographed song. Was there any need, at all, for this puerile addition? It made me further wonder if the audience would come to watch the movie only for this song. Or did the makers add it for relief from all of that heavy melodrama?, I continued to ponder. Needless to say, this particular addition put me off completely, and if it wasn’t for the intermission immediately afterwards, I would have walked out.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Much aggression. So amaze. Wow.

Much aggression. So amaze. Wow.

Among the actors, Akshay Kumar leads in a believable turn and fits the role perfectly. He matches the physique and is agile for the part. It also helps that he keeps the character vulnerable, putting a lid on the machismo. Sidharth Malhotra tries his best Unfortunately, he’s reprised (only tepidly) the role played spectacularly by Tom Hardy. Even if we forget the original performance, his aggression never quite hits home and the bravado and wins seem unconvincing and forced. Jackie Shroff reprises the role played by Nick Nolte in the original that led him to an Academy Award nomination. He tries for most parts to be sincere but goes over the board frequently and hams it up like there’s no tomorrow. Jacqueline Fernandes is sincere in her role and is aptly cast. Among the supporting cast an actor of Ashutosh Rana’s calibre is reduced to a joker, and the original role played by Frank Grillo kept coming back to my mind. The rest of the supporting cast are all too loud and mismatched just like the film is. My heart went out for the otherwise brilliant Shefali Shah who is made to shed tears in every scene, thereby being wasted in a series of whimpers.

Worth it?

If only action set-pieces are your thing, and if you don’t mind sitting through almost two hours and forty minutes of melodrama; if you don’t care much about anything else and, most of all, if you haven’t seen Warrior, then this movie is for you (Who are you? I wouldn’t want to know) but if you are looking for a wholesome film and – like me – have seen and liked the original, you’re going to hate every minute of it.

Now why do I keep harping on about Warrior and Tom Hardy, you ask. Here’s a tiny why: the scene in which Sidharth Malhotra’s character charges towards his opponent with his left arm stretched out is Malhotra replaying what Hardy did in Warrior. Try sourcing out both the scenes and you’ll know exactly what aggression on screen means, what a great actor does to a scene and how it elevates a movie single handedly.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Akshay Kumar
Sidharth Malhotra
Jackie Shroff
Director Karan Malhotra
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

So riddle me this: you buy the remake rights of an already formulaic film, dilute and dumb it down to the bare minimum semblance levels, insert an absolutely unnecessary song, score a jarring background score that only amplifies the unending melodrama, and have an insufferable first half – only to lead you into a rushed and underwhelming second half.

Quick question: WHY?

Brothers is an official remake of Gavin O’Connor’s critical-success-but-commercial-disaster Warrior, which I absolutely loved despite it the cliches, chiefly because of the solid performances by the cast led by the incredible Tom Hardy and the thrill of the rather brilliantly choreographed MMA sequences. Brothers on the other hand, accentuates the genre cliches and dilutes the strengths of the original, leading to an unimpressive finished product. While Warrior had a sense of honesty and was overall cathartic, Brothers strikes many false notes and appears manipulative. It is marketed as the ultimate showdown between two brothers and that seems to be the only motive here as it meanders its way through bumps and blocks to ultimately reach to the promised flash point. If those 20 minutes or so of MMA sequences are your fix, then this is your film, but if you’re looking for a wholesome film, stay away.

What’s it About?

A guilt ridden ex-street fighter and now ex-con Garson Fernandes (Jackie Shroff) returns to his haunting past and tries to reconcile with his estranged sons. One of them is an ex-fighter like him, but now works as a school teacher while the other one is mostly a wastrel who aspires to be a fighter but for failed reasons. David, (Akshay Kumar, Baby) the elder one, also moonlights as a street-fighter in illegal fights for some extra cash to support his family and an ailing daughter while the junior Fernandes, Monty (Sidharth Malhotra, Hasee To Phasee) is mostly struggling as a fighter and gets himself and his self-respect beaten down regularly. The emergence of a legal platform called R2F( Right to Fight) promoted as a sport gives both the brothers a shot at redemption, the former for money and the latter for recognition.

OMG WHY SO SERIOUS?

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Let’s give credit where it’s due; Brothers has cast its players well. The principal cast puts up mostly assured performances, but that is where the credit ends as they are let down by a manipulative screenplay and lazy editing. The movie takes its own sweet time to set up the story and aims at establishing all the angles and motives in a rather elaborate and loud manner; subtlety is obviously not something it was aiming for. It’s quite apparent that, while on the writing table, a “genius” had that “Eureka!” moment wherein it dawned on them, that since they were going to remake a Hollywood film in India, they must simplify for the audience by explaining each and every motive and move. Director Karan Malhotra seems to be greatly inspired from Prakash Mehra and Manmohan Desai and likes to keep the melodrama quotient heavy, so much so that the first half of the film almost has its actors shedding tears and either crying (sometimes even howling) or moving around with long faces. Brothers clearly aims at your tear glands and wants you to cry your heart out for the ‘brothers’, the only problem being that the proceedings are shallow and never really make you care for them. Even the mandatory insertion of an ailing kid doesn’t quite cut the thick barrier to get to your heart strings. The end result is therefore superficial and uninspiring.

A major part of the film’s draw is the MMA sequences and while Brothers follows the order of the sequence from its original film, it misses the aggression that the original cast brought along and the  choreography is underwhelming in comparison. That part alone had the capability to lift the movie and would have made the audience forgive a majority of its follies. Alas! They’re as tepid as the rest of the movie. We keep hearing the words “techniques” and “abilities” for our ‘Brothers’ but fail to see those. I guess we were just supposed to believe what we hear rather than see and experience them for ourselves now, weren’t we?

While watching the film last night, when the movie suddenly breaks into the dance number featuring Kareena Kapoor Khan, I just sat there wondering what exactly was the purpose of this unnecessary, rather suggestively shot and choreographed song. Was there any need, at all, for this puerile addition? It made me further wonder if the audience would come to watch the movie only for this song. Or did the makers add it for relief from all of that heavy melodrama?, I continued to ponder. Needless to say, this particular addition put me off completely, and if it wasn’t for the intermission immediately afterwards, I would have walked out.

Much aggression. So amaze. Wow.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Among the actors, Akshay Kumar leads in a believable turn and fits the role perfectly. He matches the physique and is agile for the part. It also helps that he keeps the character vulnerable, putting a lid on the machismo. Sidharth Malhotra tries his best Unfortunately, he’s reprised (only tepidly) the role played spectacularly by Tom Hardy. Even if we forget the original performance, his aggression never quite hits home and the bravado and wins seem unconvincing and forced. Jackie Shroff reprises the role played by Nick Nolte in the original that led him to an Academy Award nomination. He tries for most parts to be sincere but goes over the board frequently and hams it up like there’s no tomorrow. Jacqueline Fernandes is sincere in her role and is aptly cast. Among the supporting cast an actor of Ashutosh Rana’s calibre is reduced to a joker, and the original role played by Frank Grillo kept coming back to my mind. The rest of the supporting cast are all too loud and mismatched just like the film is. My heart went out for the otherwise brilliant Shefali Shah who is made to shed tears in every scene, thereby being wasted in a series of whimpers.

Worth it?

If only action set-pieces are your thing, and if you don’t mind sitting through almost two hours and forty minutes of melodrama; if you don’t care much about anything else and, most of all, if you haven’t seen Warrior, then this movie is for you (Who are you? I wouldn’t want to know) but if you are looking for a wholesome film and – like me – have seen and liked the original, you’re going to hate every minute of it.

Now why do I keep harping on about Warrior and Tom Hardy, you ask. Here’s a tiny why: the scene in which Sidharth Malhotra’s character charges towards his opponent with his left arm stretched out is Malhotra replaying what Hardy did in Warrior. Try sourcing out both the scenes and you’ll know exactly what aggression on screen means, what a great actor does to a scene and how it elevates a movie single handedly.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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