Burnt

All formula, no intuition


Burnt

  • All formula, no intuition

Burnt

  • All formula, no intuition


Rated

R

Starring

Bradley Cooper
Sienna Miller
Daniel Brühl
Emma Thompson
Uma Thurman

Written by

Steven Knight
Michael Kalesniko

Directed by

John Wells



coming up

What to Expect

Fall from grace and then road to redemption is one of the most loved, inspiring and crowd pulling themes in movies. It works even better if the stakes are high and there is an underdog the audience is rooting for. Burnt, written by the otherwise wonderful Steven Knight (Eastern Promises, Locke) who quite recently re-adapted a similarly themed The Hundred-Foot Journey seems a bit challenged when it comes to creating an original around food and the people in this business and profession. Steven gets the formula right and director John Wells puts the formula to effect, and that is exactly where Burnt falls short; all formula, no intuition.

What’s it About?

Chef Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper; Silver Linings Playbook), who managed to make a name for himself and earn two Michelin Stars in Paris, has wasted it all due to his addiction. Now, having managed to sober himself up, he moves to London in the hope of turning his life around and to get that third, elusive, Michelin Star. 

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Bradley Cooper - Burnt

I’m smirkin’. Super smirkin’.

For most parts Burnt is trying very hard to be something substantial and in its pursuit for that, it just tries to ape or, at best, get inspired by stereotypes of the worst kinds. The notion that a hard nosed chef should yell and bully his staff and act out like Gordon Ramsey is plain old, tired and so MasterChef USA. Adam Jones, we are repeatedly told, is an artist and yet we are rarely introduced to his artistic merit; all we get is finished products whizzed past the screen. The idea may have been to focus on the personal side and not on the process. If that is the case, then little is offered as an explanation, let alone insight, into Adam’s maniacal and self loathing side, except that ‘he had a difficult childhood’. Having said that, the movie is not without its moments, particularly and ironically that are spent in the kitchen. One such aforementioned moment is the elliptical process highlighted by the co-workers passing by from wishing ‘Good Morning’ to ‘Good Night Chef’. While the script itself is mediocre, the actors are in fine form and they help to elevate the scenes individually. The ones involving the interaction of Jones with his therapist Dr. Rosshilde, played by the wonderful Emma Thompson, are particularly spectacular.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Burnt

American Snip-oh wait.

Bradley Cooper as Adam Jones is a bundle of nervous energy masked by a lot of unjustified anger, so much so, that it almost feels a caricature of Gordon Ramsey. A fine actor, Cooper, is left mostly confused about the direction to take due to the befuddled character he plays. While Burnt suffers from a predictable script, it benefits from a fine ensemble of actors, who albeit underutilized, deliver their part with competence. Names like Emma Thompson, Uma Thurman, Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Mathew Rhys  and Alicia Vikander are enough to raise a lot of hopes from the movie. They are also the saving grace for a film that would have been a complete washout with a lesser capable ensemble.

Worth it?

While the protagonist is aiming for the ultimate honour, the movie itself is nowhere close to being gourmet. At best it is fast food to be consumed in hurry, with nothing to savour. And worse? It doesn’t leave an aftertaste of any kind.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Bradley Cooper
Sienna Miller
Daniel Brühl
Emma Thompson
Uma Thurman

Written by

Steven Knight
Michael Kalesniko

Directed by

John Wells



What to Expect

Fall from grace and then road to redemption is one of the most loved, inspiring and crowd pulling themes in movies. It works even better if the stakes are high and there is an underdog the audience is rooting for. Burnt, written by the otherwise wonderful Steven Knight (Eastern Promises, Locke) who quite recently re-adapted a similarly themed The Hundred-Foot Journey seems a bit challenged when it comes to creating an original around food and the people in this business and profession. Steven gets the formula right and director John Wells puts the formula to effect, and that is exactly where Burnt falls short; all formula, no intuition.

What’s it About?

Chef Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper; Silver Linings Playbook), who managed to make a name for himself and earn two Michelin Stars in Paris, has wasted it all due to his addiction. Now, having managed to sober himself up, he moves to London in the hope of turning his life around and to get that third, elusive, Michelin Star. 

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Bradley Cooper - Burnt

I’m smirkin’. Super smirkin’.

For most parts Burnt is trying very hard to be something substantial and in its pursuit for that, it just tries to ape or, at best, get inspired by stereotypes of the worst kinds. The notion that a hard nosed chef should yell and bully his staff and act out like Gordon Ramsey is plain old, tired and so MasterChef USA. Adam Jones, we are repeatedly told, is an artist and yet we are rarely introduced to his artistic merit; all we get is finished products whizzed past the screen. The idea may have been to focus on the personal side and not on the process. If that is the case, then little is offered as an explanation, let alone insight, into Adam’s maniacal and self loathing side, except that ‘he had a difficult childhood’. Having said that, the movie is not without its moments, particularly and ironically that are spent in the kitchen. One such aforementioned moment is the elliptical process highlighted by the co-workers passing by from wishing ‘Good Morning’ to ‘Good Night Chef’. While the script itself is mediocre, the actors are in fine form and they help to elevate the scenes individually. The ones involving the interaction of Jones with his therapist Dr. Rosshilde, played by the wonderful Emma Thompson, are particularly spectacular.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Burnt

American Snip-oh wait.

Bradley Cooper as Adam Jones is a bundle of nervous energy masked by a lot of unjustified anger, so much so, that it almost feels a caricature of Gordon Ramsey. A fine actor, Cooper, is left mostly confused about the direction to take due to the befuddled character he plays. While Burnt suffers from a predictable script, it benefits from a fine ensemble of actors, who albeit underutilized, deliver their part with competence. Names like Emma Thompson, Uma Thurman, Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Mathew Rhys  and Alicia Vikander are enough to raise a lot of hopes from the movie. They are also the saving grace for a film that would have been a complete washout with a lesser capable ensemble.

Worth it?

While the protagonist is aiming for the ultimate honour, the movie itself is nowhere close to being gourmet. At best it is fast food to be consumed in hurry, with nothing to savour. And worse? It doesn’t leave an aftertaste of any kind.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Bradley Cooper
Sienna Miller
Daniel Brühl
Director John Wells
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

Yay. Cooking. Knives. Bradley Cooper.

Yay. Cooking. Knives. Bradley Cooper.

Fall from grace and then road to redemption is one of the most loved, inspiring and crowd pulling themes in movies. It works even better if the stakes are high and there is an underdog the audience is rooting for. Burnt, written by the otherwise wonderful Steven Knight (Eastern Promises, Locke) who quite recently re-adapted a similarly themed The Hundred-Foot Journey seems a bit challenged when it comes to creating an original around food and the people in this business and profession. Steven gets the formula right and director John Wells puts the formula to effect, and that is exactly where Burnt falls short; all formula, no intuition.

What’s it About?

Chef Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper; Silver Linings Playbook), who managed to make a name for himself and earn two Michelin Stars in Paris, has wasted it all due to his addiction. Now, having managed to sober himself up, he moves to London in the hope of turning his life around and to get that third, elusive, Michelin Star. 

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Bradley Cooper - Burnt

I’m smirkin’. Super smirkin’.

For most parts Burnt is trying very hard to be something substantial and in its pursuit for that, it just tries to ape or, at best, get inspired by stereotypes of the worst kinds. The notion that a hard nosed chef should yell and bully his staff and act out like Gordon Ramsey is plain old, tired and so MasterChef USA. Adam Jones, we are repeatedly told, is an artist and yet we are rarely introduced to his artistic merit; all we get is finished products whizzed past the screen. The idea may have been to focus on the personal side and not on the process. If that is the case, then little is offered as an explanation, let alone insight, into Adam’s maniacal and self loathing side, except that ‘he had a difficult childhood’. Having said that, the movie is not without its moments, particularly and ironically that are spent in the kitchen. One such aforementioned moment is the elliptical process highlighted by the co-workers passing by from wishing ‘Good Morning’ to ‘Good Night Chef’. While the script itself is mediocre, the actors are in fine form and they help to elevate the scenes individually. The ones involving the interaction of Jones with his therapist Dr. Rosshilde, played by the wonderful Emma Thompson, are particularly spectacular.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Burnt

American Snip-oh wait.

Bradley Cooper as Adam Jones is a bundle of nervous energy masked by a lot of unjustified anger, so much so, that it almost feels a caricature of Gordon Ramsey. A fine actor, Cooper, is left mostly confused about the direction to take due to the befuddled character he plays. While Burnt suffers from a predictable script, it benefits from a fine ensemble of actors, who albeit underutilized, deliver their part with competence. Names like Emma Thompson, Uma Thurman, Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Mathew Rhys  and Alicia Vikander are enough to raise a lot of hopes from the movie. They are also the saving grace for a film that would have been a complete washout with a lesser capable ensemble.

Worth it?

While the protagonist is aiming for the ultimate honour, the movie itself is nowhere close to being gourmet. At best it is fast food to be consumed in hurry, with nothing to savour. And worse? It doesn’t leave an aftertaste of any kind.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Bradley Cooper
Sienna Miller
Daniel Brühl
Director John Wells
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

Fall from grace and then road to redemption is one of the most loved, inspiring and crowd pulling themes in movies. It works even better if the stakes are high and there is an underdog the audience is rooting for. Burnt, written by the otherwise wonderful Steven Knight (Eastern Promises, Locke) who quite recently re-adapted a similarly themed The Hundred-Foot Journey seems a bit challenged when it comes to creating an original around food and the people in this business and profession. Steven gets the formula right and director John Wells puts the formula to effect, and that is exactly where Burnt falls short; all formula, no intuition.

What’s it About?

Chef Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper; Silver Linings Playbook), who managed to make a name for himself and earn two Michelin Stars in Paris, has wasted it all due to his addiction. Now, having managed to sober himself up, he moves to London in the hope of turning his life around and to get that third, elusive, Michelin Star. 

I'm Smirkin'. Super Smirkin'.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

For most parts Burnt is trying very hard to be something substantial and in its pursuit for that, it just tries to ape or, at best, get inspired by stereotypes of the worst kinds. The notion that a hard nosed chef should yell and bully his staff and act out like Gordon Ramsey is plain old, tired and so MasterChef USA. Adam Jones, we are repeatedly told, is an artist and yet we are rarely introduced to his artistic merit; all we get is finished products whizzed past the screen. The idea may have been to focus on the personal side and not on the process. If that is the case, then little is offered as an explanation, let alone insight, into Adam’s maniacal and self loathing side, except that ‘he had a difficult childhood’. Having said that, the movie is not without its moments, particularly and ironically that are spent in the kitchen. One such aforementioned moment is the elliptical process highlighted by the co-workers passing by from wishing ‘Good Morning’ to ‘Good Night Chef’. While the script itself is mediocre, the actors are in fine form and they help to elevate the scenes individually. The ones involving the interaction of Jones with his therapist Dr. Rosshilde, played by the wonderful Emma Thompson, are particularly spectacular.

American Snip-oh wait.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Bradley Cooper as Adam Jones is a bundle of nervous energy masked by a lot of unjustified anger, so much so, that it almost feels a caricature of Gordon Ramsey. A fine actor, Cooper, is left mostly confused about the direction to take due to the befuddled character he plays. While Burnt suffers from a predictable script, it benefits from a fine ensemble of actors, who albeit underutilized, deliver their part with competence. Names like Emma Thompson, Uma Thurman, Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Mathew Rhys  and Alicia Vikander are enough to raise a lot of hopes from the movie. They are also the saving grace for a film that would have been a complete washout with a lesser capable ensemble.

Worth it?

While the protagonist is aiming for the ultimate honour, the movie itself is nowhere close to being gourmet. At best it is fast food to be consumed in hurry, with nothing to savour. And worse? It doesn’t leave an aftertaste of any kind.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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