Captain America: Civil War

BEST. SUPERHERO. MOVIE. EVER!


Captain America: Civil War

  • BEST. SUPERHERO. MOVIE. EVER!

Captain America: Civil War

  • BEST. SUPERHERO. MOVIE. EVER!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Evans
Sebastian Stan
Robert Downey Jr.
Scarlett Johansson
Elizabeth Olsen

Written by

Christopher Markus
Stephen McFeely

Directed by

Anthony Russo
Joe Russo



WHAT TO EXPECT

I’ve become incredibly jaded to superhero movies.

It’s not like I hate them—well, there are those poor excuse of films Daredevil, and Elektra, of course—but if one’s to look at pop-culture movies of late, movies about superheroes have reached an obnoxious high-point.

They’ve peaked. They’re way too many. How’s one to digest all of ‘em?

Civil War, though, was one movie I’ve been pretty excited to watch. For one, because its predecessor The Winter Soldier had a deliciously enthralling espionage thriller flavor that’s unmatchable by all means.

But there obviously was another reason. The build-up to the successor relied all too heavily on the impending “War” between Captain America and Iron Man, and viewers obviously did wait with bated breath for the events to unfold. Of course, there’s a stickler. The failure of its DC counterpart Dawn of Justice made me look forward to it way lesser than I thought it would, and for many justifiable reasons. Then again, this is Marvel, and despite its Cinematic Universe’s slip-ups, it’s been able to redeem itself by focussing solely on consistent, unhurried build-ups.

And that’s what I went in for, with bated breath. My money was on Marvel, and I wanted to know if it would fail me like its DC counterpart would.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Post their Sokovia gig, the governments around the world want to regulate the Avengers. The guilt-ridden Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.; The Judge) is all for it, but Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is vehemently against it. Of course, there’s also this teensy problem of his old friend Bucky “The Winter Soldier” Barnes (Sebastian Stan) surfacing, once more, as one of the prime suspects of a major terrorist attack, which rifts Stark and Rogers further apart, bringing them down points of no return.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Marvel's Captain America: Civil War | Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) | Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal © Marvel 2016

Belief versus ideals

Civil War needed itself to be a crackling-good film. The Russos, after all, now have their predecessor The Winter Solider to live up to. But despite it all—despite how jaded you’d be to the barrage of superhero films hitting cinemas every couple’a months—the third solo Captain America movie is an absolute blast. And believe you me, for I’m not mincing words. This is exactly the film about superheroes we needed in more than one way, to be relatively honest. And let me explain just why.

Remember Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice? The film covers eerily similar ground with both the prime protagonists and the opposing force acting out in a similar fashion. The runtime between the two films in itself proves both films had a lot to cover (Civil War rests at 2 hours and 27 minutes—a mere six minutes shy of that of its DC counterpart). What the directors and writers here do understand, compared to Snyder’s messy end-product, is to establish the face-off between the protagonists in as brilliant a way as possible. Behind Tony Stark’s trademark cockiness and Steve Rogers’s idealism lie a plethora of emotions—guilt, love, misunderstood rage, and revenge. Each of these emotions is given a quiet space for proper emotional buildup, which is necessary when you’re trying to present two different points of view.

Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.Ankit Ojha

Marvel's Captain America: Civil War | Black Widow/Natasha Romanoff (Scarlett Johansson) | Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal © Marvel 2016

Friendship versus responsibility

Do the protagonists here have vices? Yes, they quite definitely do. Steve Rogers is selfish, defensive, and overprotective, and it hinders his foresight completely. Taking story elements of Avengers: Age of Ultron forward, Tony Stark’s swagger-and-snark is smartly balanced by a desperate need for redemption. Both characters have their personal battles which each is buried neck-deep in. Each cannot understand the other, and the viewers feel it. They feel desperately for the characters. The makers have successfully set up a universe for its protagonists that its audience has a birds-eye view on. This manipulates them to pine desperately for both of them to find some compassion and perspective to end their battle.

That’s not all. This is the sequel to The Avengers that we needed, as opposed to Whedon’s well-made yet ultimately exhausting official sequel. Missing the Hulk and Thor, the film packs in almost every other character in the Marvel Cinematic Universe so far. But that’s not just it. When you look at Bucky, you feel for him. When you look at Romanoff, you know where she’s coming from and where her loyalty lies. And even when you look at its new entrants—Black Panther and Spider-Manyou’re aware of the justification for their existence. Not a single character looks either out of place or a forced tack-on. And this is why the Russos and the writers win big. Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.

Funnily enough, we’re still far from done praising it.

There’s a certain completeness to the film, and that comes not just from the story, but just how strong the technical filmmaking is. Civil War boasts of some of the best action set-pieces viewers will have witnessed in the Marvel universe in quite a while now. The sheer energy, supported by just the right amount of edit decisions to support them—kudos to Jeffrey Ford and Matthew Schmidt, who jointly return to collaborate with the Russos after The Winter Soldier—give this film its much-needed breathlessness. Of the most jaw-dropping ones, Black Panther’s establishing set-piece and the runway set battle boasts absolute brilliance. These, supported by some of the finest stunt-work I’ve seen in a major film in a while, give viewers a sense of realism; of authenticity, you’d never expect from a film that has its roots in fantasy itself. Shot beautifully by Trent Opaloch (another Winter Soldier returnee), the film’s gorgeous expansiveness comes through the understandably wide depth of field its lenses choose to go with, giving its impressive production design absolute justice.

But the team wouldn’t be complete with Henry Jackman, who was also a part of the predecessor. And he rocks the soundtrack like nobody else would.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Captain America: Civil War | L to R: Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) and Iron Man/Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) | Ph: Zade Rosenthal   ©Marvel 2016

Friend versus friend

Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., and Sebastian Stan are—quite obviously—fantastic. But they’re not the only ones in focus here. There’s a lot at stake; a lot of talented actors in one movie, performing a barrage of well-established characters either in the cinematic universe or the comic books they’re inspired by.

And the great thing about all of this is that they’re all perfect. Be it Tom Holland’s stint as Peter Parker and Spider-Man (holy mother of God, SPIDER-MAN) or Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, every single human here is at the top of their game. Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow is a force of nature. Emily VanCamp exudes confidence. Jeremy Renner is great. Elizabeth Olsen is a surprise here, especially for just how emotionally resonant her character actually is in comparison to her appearance in Age of Ultron. Also, Paul Rudd is great, but his appearance as Ant-Man is brilliant. (And when I say “brilliant”, I totally mean it. He’s on point, and the big twist featuring him is so goddamn amazing). Of course, there’s also Daniel Brühl as the quiet antagonistic force, who doesn’t overplay his emotions and who nails it right on the head.

In short, and in the least articulate way possible, EVERYBODY IS AMAZING, THAT WILL BE ALL.

WORTH IT?

Captain America: Civil War is both the Avengers sequel we all deserved, and the movie Batman v Superman definitely SHOULD have been. At almost two hours and a half, the film is a breathlessly entertaining roller-coaster ride that does (more than) occasionally coasts through some emotionally relevant scenes that hit you right where they should.

Is this the best Marvel movie in the universe? YES. Is this the best superhero movie I’ve seen in a while? HELL YES. Do I recommend this movie with all my head and heart? ABSOLUTELY?

In short, and—yet again—in the least articulate way possible, EVERYTHING IS AMAZING WATCH THIS MOVIE NOW ‘KAY THANKS BYE!

PS: An IMAX 3D experience totally recommended here.

Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Evans
Sebastian Stan
Robert Downey Jr.
Scarlett Johansson
Elizabeth Olsen

Written by

Christopher Markus
Stephen McFeely

Directed by

Anthony Russo
Joe Russo



WHAT TO EXPECT

I’ve become incredibly jaded to superhero movies.

It’s not like I hate them—well, there are those poor excuse of films Daredevil, and Elektra, of course—but if one’s to look at pop-culture movies of late, movies about superheroes have reached an obnoxious high-point.

They’ve peaked. They’re way too many. How’s one to digest all of ‘em?

Civil War, though, was one movie I’ve been pretty excited to watch. For one, because its predecessor The Winter Soldier had a deliciously enthralling espionage thriller flavor that’s unmatchable by all means.

But there obviously was another reason. The build-up to the successor relied all too heavily on the impending “War” between Captain America and Iron Man, and viewers obviously did wait with bated breath for the events to unfold. Of course, there’s a stickler. The failure of its DC counterpart Dawn of Justice made me look forward to it way lesser than I thought it would, and for many justifiable reasons. Then again, this is Marvel, and despite its Cinematic Universe’s slip-ups, it’s been able to redeem itself by focussing solely on consistent, unhurried build-ups.

And that’s what I went in for, with bated breath. My money was on Marvel, and I wanted to know if it would fail me like its DC counterpart would.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Post their Sokovia gig, the governments around the world want to regulate the Avengers. The guilt-ridden Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.; The Judge) is all for it, but Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is vehemently against it. Of course, there’s also this teensy problem of his old friend Bucky “The Winter Soldier” Barnes (Sebastian Stan) surfacing, once more, as one of the prime suspects of a major terrorist attack, which rifts Stark and Rogers further apart, bringing them down points of no return.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Marvel's Captain America: Civil War | Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) | Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal © Marvel 2016

Belief versus ideals

Civil War needed itself to be a crackling-good film. The Russos, after all, now have their predecessor The Winter Solider to live up to. But despite it all—despite how jaded you’d be to the barrage of superhero films hitting cinemas every couple’a months—the third solo Captain America movie is an absolute blast. And believe you me, for I’m not mincing words. This is exactly the film about superheroes we needed in more than one way, to be relatively honest. And let me explain just why.

Remember Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice? The film covers eerily similar ground with both the prime protagonists and the opposing force acting out in a similar fashion. The runtime between the two films in itself proves both films had a lot to cover (Civil War rests at 2 hours and 27 minutes—a mere six minutes shy of that of its DC counterpart). What the directors and writers here do understand, compared to Snyder’s messy end-product, is to establish the face-off between the protagonists in as brilliant a way as possible. Behind Tony Stark’s trademark cockiness and Steve Rogers’s idealism lie a plethora of emotions—guilt, love, misunderstood rage, and revenge. Each of these emotions is given a quiet space for proper emotional buildup, which is necessary when you’re trying to present two different points of view.

Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.Ankit Ojha

Marvel's Captain America: Civil War | Black Widow/Natasha Romanoff (Scarlett Johansson) | Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal © Marvel 2016

Friendship versus responsibility

Do the protagonists here have vices? Yes, they quite definitely do. Steve Rogers is selfish, defensive, and overprotective, and it hinders his foresight completely. Taking story elements of Avengers: Age of Ultron forward, Tony Stark’s swagger-and-snark is smartly balanced by a desperate need for redemption. Both characters have their personal battles which each is buried neck-deep in. Each cannot understand the other, and the viewers feel it. They feel desperately for the characters. The makers have successfully set up a universe for its protagonists that its audience has a birds-eye view on. This manipulates them to pine desperately for both of them to find some compassion and perspective to end their battle.

That’s not all. This is the sequel to The Avengers that we needed, as opposed to Whedon’s well-made yet ultimately exhausting official sequel. Missing the Hulk and Thor, the film packs in almost every other character in the Marvel Cinematic Universe so far. But that’s not just it. When you look at Bucky, you feel for him. When you look at Romanoff, you know where she’s coming from and where her loyalty lies. And even when you look at its new entrants—Black Panther and Spider-Manyou’re aware of the justification for their existence. Not a single character looks either out of place or a forced tack-on. And this is why the Russos and the writers win big. Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.

Funnily enough, we’re still far from done praising it.

There’s a certain completeness to the film, and that comes not just from the story, but just how strong the technical filmmaking is. Civil War boasts of some of the best action set-pieces viewers will have witnessed in the Marvel universe in quite a while now. The sheer energy, supported by just the right amount of edit decisions to support them—kudos to Jeffrey Ford and Matthew Schmidt, who jointly return to collaborate with the Russos after The Winter Soldier—give this film its much-needed breathlessness. Of the most jaw-dropping ones, Black Panther’s establishing set-piece and the runway set battle boasts absolute brilliance. These, supported by some of the finest stunt-work I’ve seen in a major film in a while, give viewers a sense of realism; of authenticity, you’d never expect from a film that has its roots in fantasy itself. Shot beautifully by Trent Opaloch (another Winter Soldier returnee), the film’s gorgeous expansiveness comes through the understandably wide depth of field its lenses choose to go with, giving its impressive production design absolute justice.

But the team wouldn’t be complete with Henry Jackman, who was also a part of the predecessor. And he rocks the soundtrack like nobody else would.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Captain America: Civil War | L to R: Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) and Iron Man/Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) | Ph: Zade Rosenthal   ©Marvel 2016

Friend versus friend

Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., and Sebastian Stan are—quite obviously—fantastic. But they’re not the only ones in focus here. There’s a lot at stake; a lot of talented actors in one movie, performing a barrage of well-established characters either in the cinematic universe or the comic books they’re inspired by.

And the great thing about all of this is that they’re all perfect. Be it Tom Holland’s stint as Peter Parker and Spider-Man (holy mother of God, SPIDER-MAN) or Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, every single human here is at the top of their game. Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow is a force of nature. Emily VanCamp exudes confidence. Jeremy Renner is great. Elizabeth Olsen is a surprise here, especially for just how emotionally resonant her character actually is in comparison to her appearance in Age of Ultron. Also, Paul Rudd is great, but his appearance as Ant-Man is brilliant. (And when I say “brilliant”, I totally mean it. He’s on point, and the big twist featuring him is so goddamn amazing). Of course, there’s also Daniel Brühl as the quiet antagonistic force, who doesn’t overplay his emotions and who nails it right on the head.

In short, and in the least articulate way possible, EVERYBODY IS AMAZING, THAT WILL BE ALL.

WORTH IT?

Captain America: Civil War is both the Avengers sequel we all deserved, and the movie Batman v Superman definitely SHOULD have been. At almost two hours and a half, the film is a breathlessly entertaining roller-coaster ride that does (more than) occasionally coasts through some emotionally relevant scenes that hit you right where they should.

Is this the best Marvel movie in the universe? YES. Is this the best superhero movie I’ve seen in a while? HELL YES. Do I recommend this movie with all my head and heart? ABSOLUTELY?

In short, and—yet again—in the least articulate way possible, EVERYTHING IS AMAZING WATCH THIS MOVIE NOW ‘KAY THANKS BYE!

PS: An IMAX 3D experience totally recommended here.

Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Chris Evans
Robert Downey Jr.
Scarlett Johansson
Director Anthony Russo
Joe Russo
Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League

WHAT TO EXPECT

Dawn of Awesomeness

Dawn of Awesomeness

I’ve become incredibly jaded to superhero movies.

It’s not like I hate them—well, there are those poor excuse of films Daredevil, and Elektra, of course—but if one’s to look at pop-culture movies of late, movies about superheroes have reached an obnoxious high-point.

They’ve peaked. They’re way too many. How’s one to digest all of ‘em?

Civil War, though, was one movie I’ve been pretty excited to watch. For one, because its predecessor The Winter Soldier had a deliciously enthralling espionage thriller flavor that’s unmatchable by all means.

But there obviously was another reason. The build-up to the successor relied all too heavily on the impending “War” between Captain America and Iron Man, and viewers obviously did wait with bated breath for the events to unfold. Of course, there’s a stickler. The failure of its DC counterpart Dawn of Justice made me look forward to it way lesser than I thought it would, and for many justifiable reasons. Then again, this is Marvel, and despite its Cinematic Universe’s slip-ups, it’s been able to redeem itself by focussing solely on consistent, unhurried build-ups.

And that’s what I went in for, with bated breath. My money was on Marvel, and I wanted to know if it would fail me like its DC counterpart would.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Post their Sokovia gig, the governments around the world want to regulate the Avengers. The guilt-ridden Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.; The Judge) is all for it, but Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is vehemently against it. Of course, there’s also this teensy problem of his old friend Bucky “The Winter Soldier” Barnes (Sebastian Stan) surfacing, once more, as one of the prime suspects of a major terrorist attack, which rifts Stark and Rogers further apart, bringing them down points of no return.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Marvel's Captain America: Civil War | Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) | Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal © Marvel 2016

Belief versus ideals

Civil War needed itself to be a crackling-good film. The Russos, after all, now have their predecessor The Winter Solider to live up to. But despite it all—despite how jaded you’d be to the barrage of superhero films hitting cinemas every couple’a months—the third solo Captain America movie is an absolute blast. And believe you me, for I’m not mincing words. This is exactly the film about superheroes we needed in more than one way, to be relatively honest. And let me explain just why.

Remember Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice? The film covers eerily similar ground with both the prime protagonists and the opposing force acting out in a similar fashion. The runtime between the two films in itself proves both films had a lot to cover (Civil War rests at 2 hours and 27 minutes—a mere six minutes shy of that of its DC counterpart). What the directors and writers here do understand, compared to Snyder’s messy end-product, is to establish the face-off between the protagonists in as brilliant a way as possible. Behind Tony Stark’s trademark cockiness and Steve Rogers’s idealism lie a plethora of emotions—guilt, love, misunderstood rage, and revenge. Each of these emotions is given a quiet space for proper emotional buildup, which is necessary when you’re trying to present two different points of view.

Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.Ankit Ojha

Marvel's Captain America: Civil War | Black Widow/Natasha Romanoff (Scarlett Johansson) | Photo Credit: Zade Rosenthal © Marvel 2016

Friendship versus responsibility

Do the protagonists here have vices? Yes, they quite definitely do. Steve Rogers is selfish, defensive, and overprotective, and it hinders his foresight completely. Taking story elements of Avengers: Age of Ultron forward, Tony Stark’s swagger-and-snark is smartly balanced by a desperate need for redemption. Both characters have their personal battles which each is buried neck-deep in. Each cannot understand the other, and the viewers feel it. They feel desperately for the characters. The makers have successfully set up a universe for its protagonists that its audience has a birds-eye view on. This manipulates them to pine desperately for both of them to find some compassion and perspective to end their battle.

That’s not all. This is the sequel to The Avengers that we needed, as opposed to Whedon’s well-made yet ultimately exhausting official sequel. Missing the Hulk and Thor, the film packs in almost every other character in the Marvel Cinematic Universe so far. But that’s not just it. When you look at Bucky, you feel for him. When you look at Romanoff, you know where she’s coming from and where her loyalty lies. And even when you look at its new entrants—Black Panther and Spider-Manyou’re aware of the justification for their existence. Not a single character looks either out of place or a forced tack-on. And this is why the Russos and the writers win big. Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.

Funnily enough, we’re still far from done praising it.

There’s a certain completeness to the film, and that comes not just from the story, but just how strong the technical filmmaking is. Civil War boasts of some of the best action set-pieces viewers will have witnessed in the Marvel universe in quite a while now. The sheer energy, supported by just the right amount of edit decisions to support them—kudos to Jeffrey Ford and Matthew Schmidt, who jointly return to collaborate with the Russos after The Winter Soldier—give this film its much-needed breathlessness. Of the most jaw-dropping ones, Black Panther’s establishing set-piece and the runway set battle boasts absolute brilliance. These, supported by some of the finest stunt-work I’ve seen in a major film in a while, give viewers a sense of realism; of authenticity, you’d never expect from a film that has its roots in fantasy itself. Shot beautifully by Trent Opaloch (another Winter Soldier returnee), the film’s gorgeous expansiveness comes through the understandably wide depth of field its lenses choose to go with, giving its impressive production design absolute justice.

But the team wouldn’t be complete with Henry Jackman, who was also a part of the predecessor. And he rocks the soundtrack like nobody else would.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Captain America: Civil War | L to R: Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) and Iron Man/Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) | Ph: Zade Rosenthal   ©Marvel 2016

Friend versus friend

Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., and Sebastian Stan are—quite obviously—fantastic. But they’re not the only ones in focus here. There’s a lot at stake; a lot of talented actors in one movie, performing a barrage of well-established characters either in the cinematic universe or the comic books they’re inspired by.

And the great thing about all of this is that they’re all perfect. Be it Tom Holland’s stint as Peter Parker and Spider-Man (holy mother of God, SPIDER-MAN) or Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, every single human here is at the top of their game. Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow is a force of nature. Emily VanCamp exudes confidence. Jeremy Renner is great. Elizabeth Olsen is a surprise here, especially for just how emotionally resonant her character actually is in comparison to her appearance in Age of Ultron. Also, Paul Rudd is great, but his appearance as Ant-Man is brilliant. (And when I say “brilliant”, I totally mean it. He’s on point, and the big twist featuring him is so goddamn amazing). Of course, there’s also Daniel Brühl as the quiet antagonistic force, who doesn’t overplay his emotions and who nails it right on the head.

In short, and in the least articulate way possible, EVERYBODY IS AMAZING, THAT WILL BE ALL.

WORTH IT?

Captain America: Civil War is both the Avengers sequel we all deserved, and the movie Batman v Superman definitely SHOULD have been. At almost two hours and a half, the film is a breathlessly entertaining roller-coaster ride that does (more than) occasionally coasts through some emotionally relevant scenes that hit you right where they should.

Is this the best Marvel movie in the universe? YES. Is this the best superhero movie I’ve seen in a while? HELL YES. Do I recommend this movie with all my head and heart? ABSOLUTELY?

In short, and—yet again—in the least articulate way possible, EVERYTHING IS AMAZING WATCH THIS MOVIE NOW ‘KAY THANKS BYE!

PS: An IMAX 3D experience totally recommended here.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Chris Evans
Robert Downey Jr.
Scarlett Johansson
Director Anthony Russo
Joe Russo
Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League

WHAT TO EXPECT

I’ve become incredibly jaded to superhero movies.

It’s not like I hate them—well, there are those poor excuse of films Daredevil, and Elektra, of course—but if one’s to look at pop-culture movies of late, movies about superheroes have reached an obnoxious high-point.

They’ve peaked. They’re way too many. How’s one to digest all of ‘em?

Civil War, though, was one movie I’ve been pretty excited to watch. For one, because its predecessor The Winter Soldier had a deliciously enthralling espionage thriller flavor that’s unmatchable by all means.

But there obviously was another reason. The build-up to the successor relied all too heavily on the impending “War” between Captain America and Iron Man, and viewers obviously did wait with bated breath for the events to unfold. Of course, there’s a stickler. The failure of its DC counterpart Dawn of Justice made me look forward to it way lesser than I thought it would, and for many justifiable reasons. Then again, this is Marvel, and despite its Cinematic Universe’s slip-ups, it’s been able to redeem itself by focussing solely on consistent, unhurried build-ups.

And that’s what I went in for, with bated breath. My money was on Marvel, and I wanted to know if it would fail me like its DC counterpart would.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Post their Sokovia gig, the governments around the world want to regulate the Avengers. The guilt-ridden Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.; The Judge) is all for it, but Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is vehemently against it. Of course, there’s also this teensy problem of his old friend Bucky “The Winter Soldier” Barnes (Sebastian Stan) surfacing, once more, as one of the prime suspects of a major terrorist attack, which rifts Stark and Rogers further apart, bringing them down points of no return.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Belief versus ideals

Civil War needed itself to be a crackling-good film. The Russos, after all, now have their predecessor The Winter Solider to live up to. But despite it all—despite how jaded you’d be to the barrage of superhero films hitting cinemas every couple’a months—the third solo Captain America movie is an absolute blast. And believe you me, for I’m not mincing words. This is exactly the film about superheroes we needed in more than one way, to be relatively honest. And let me explain just why.

Remember Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice? The film covers eerily similar ground with both the prime protagonists and the opposing force acting out in a similar fashion. The runtime between the two films in itself proves both films had a lot to cover (Civil War rests at 2 hours and 27 minutes—a mere six minutes shy of that of its DC counterpart). What the directors and writers here do understand, compared to Snyder’s messy end-product, is to establish the face-off between the protagonists in as brilliant a way as possible. Behind Tony Stark’s trademark cockiness and Steve Rogers’s idealism lie a plethora of emotions—guilt, love, misunderstood rage, and revenge. Each of these emotions is given a quiet space for proper emotional buildup, which is necessary when you’re trying to present two different points of view.

Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.Ankit Ojha
Friendship versus responsibility

Do the protagonists here have vices? Yes, they quite definitely do. Steve Rogers is selfish, defensive, and overprotective, and it hinders his foresight completely. Taking story elements of Avengers: Age of Ultron forward, Tony Stark’s swagger-and-snark is smartly balanced by a desperate need for redemption. Both characters have their personal battles which each is buried neck-deep in. Each cannot understand the other, and the viewers feel it. They feel desperately for the characters. The makers have successfully set up a universe for its protagonists that its audience has a birds-eye view on. This manipulates them to pine desperately for both of them to find some compassion and perspective to end their battle.

That’s not all. This is the sequel to The Avengers that we needed, as opposed to Whedon’s well-made yet ultimately exhausting official sequel. Missing the Hulk and Thor, the film packs in almost every other character in the Marvel Cinematic Universe so far. But that’s not just it. When you look at Bucky, you feel for him. When you look at Romanoff, you know where she’s coming from and where her loyalty lies. And even when you look at its new entrants—Black Panther and Spider-Manyou’re aware of the justification for their existence. Not a single character looks either out of place or a forced tack-on. And this is why the Russos and the writers win big. Their unswerving focus on the story, the super(humans) running it, and the respective psyches running them gives them major points.

Funnily enough, we’re still far from done praising it.

There’s a certain completeness to the film, and that comes not just from the story, but just how strong the technical filmmaking is. Civil War boasts of some of the best action set-pieces viewers will have witnessed in the Marvel universe in quite a while now. The sheer energy, supported by just the right amount of edit decisions to support them—kudos to Jeffrey Ford and Matthew Schmidt, who jointly return to collaborate with the Russos after The Winter Soldier—give this film its much-needed breathlessness. Of the most jaw-dropping ones, Black Panther’s establishing set-piece and the runway set battle boasts absolute brilliance. These, supported by some of the finest stunt-work I’ve seen in a major film in a while, give viewers a sense of realism; of authenticity, you’d never expect from a film that has its roots in fantasy itself. Shot beautifully by Trent Opaloch (another Winter Soldier returnee), the film’s gorgeous expansiveness comes through the understandably wide depth of field its lenses choose to go with, giving its impressive production design absolute justice.

But the team wouldn’t be complete with Henry Jackman, who was also a part of the predecessor. And he rocks the soundtrack like nobody else would.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Friend versus friend

Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., and Sebastian Stan are—quite obviously—fantastic. But they’re not the only ones in focus here. There’s a lot at stake; a lot of talented actors in one movie, performing a barrage of well-established characters either in the cinematic universe or the comic books they’re inspired by.

And the great thing about all of this is that they’re all perfect. Be it Tom Holland’s stint as Peter Parker and Spider-Man (holy mother of God, SPIDER-MAN) or Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, every single human here is at the top of their game. Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow is a force of nature. Emily VanCamp exudes confidence. Jeremy Renner is great. Elizabeth Olsen is a surprise here, especially for just how emotionally resonant her character actually is in comparison to her appearance in Age of Ultron. Also, Paul Rudd is great, but his appearance as Ant-Man is brilliant. (And when I say “brilliant”, I totally mean it. He’s on point, and the big twist featuring him is so goddamn amazing). Of course, there’s also Daniel Brühl as the quiet antagonistic force, who doesn’t overplay his emotions and who nails it right on the head.

In short, and in the least articulate way possible, EVERYBODY IS AMAZING, THAT WILL BE ALL.

WORTH IT?

Captain America: Civil War is both the Avengers sequel we all deserved, and the movie Batman v Superman definitely SHOULD have been. At almost two hours and a half, the film is a breathlessly entertaining roller-coaster ride that does (more than) occasionally coasts through some emotionally relevant scenes that hit you right where they should.

Is this the best Marvel movie in the universe? YES. Is this the best superhero movie I’ve seen in a while? HELL YES. Do I recommend this movie with all my head and heart? ABSOLUTELY?

In short, and—yet again—in the least articulate way possible, EVERYTHING IS AMAZING WATCH THIS MOVIE NOW ‘KAY THANKS BYE!

PS: An IMAX 3D experience totally recommended here.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

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Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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