Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Superheroic restraint


Captain America: The Winter Soldier

  • Superheroic restraint

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

  • Superheroic restraint


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Evans
Scarlett Johansson
Anthony Mackie
Frank Grillo
Cobie Smulders

Written by

Christopher Markus
Stephen McFeely

Directed by

Anthony Russo
Joe Russo



WHAT TO EXPECT

Sequels are never supposed to be good, right? People who have seen The First Avenger obviously then wouldn’t have too much to expect, really. Sure, it was a good film, but objectively, you’ve got to agree with the writer of this review, that a gratuitously large amount of time was spent building character, with most of the closing action looking hurried – and vaguely montage-ish. Not that character buildup is a bad thing. Marvel’s counterparts X-Men: First Class and Iron Man definitely pay a lot of attention to equal doses of action, drama and character, in which case this franchise’s first installment didn’t make the cut. The Avengers definitely helped the character to an extent, although the attention almost always went to Loki, the Incredible Hulk, Natasha Romanoff or Iron Man, leaving the Chris Evans helmed role sidelined with Hawkeye. Why then, would the potential viewer want to watch this movie? This writer can definitely think of three reasons why:

  • The film receives a new lease of life with the change of directors on board;
  • Post The Avengers, we’ve got S. H. I. E. L. D. featured prominently, from what we know of the trailers; and
  • The titular antagonist definitely looks like he can kick the rear-ends of people who stand against him

So what are the problems, then, with the film? The Russo brothers – for reasons fortunate or unfortunate – have their last directorial effort to have been You, Me and Dupree. Additionally, the past few post-Avengers releases (Iron Man 3Thor: The Dark World) have generated nothing but mixed signals (although this writer does personally love Iron Man 3). What thus, does one expect to get from the film? That’s only to be known by walking through the unknown.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Steve Rogers, a. k. a. Captain America, is slowly getting to know S. H. I. E. L. D., but that certainly doesn’t mean he’s liking what he’s seeing. This apart from the fact that he seems to be trusting his own less and less. What he doesn’t know is he’s only witnessed part of a Domino-effect that just began, and might just bring the world down.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

"So basically, I have to use the shield to protect myself from The S.H.I.E.L.D? Damn"

“So basically, I have to use the shield to protect myself from The S.H.I.E.L.D? Damn”

There are a lot of reasons why this writer continues to have an absolutely neutral set of feelings for the first film; starting off with the slightly sickly xenophobia, continuing off (at the risk of repeating myself) with overdrawn character development, and reducing most of the buildup to weird elliptical (montage-like) scenes. Of course, the advantage the Russo brothers have over Johnston is that the protagonist doesn’t require any introduction per se, thanks to The First Avenger and – to quite some extent – The Avengers. What, however, makes this movie way different from it’s previous instalment – and other subsequent Marvel movies centring around the S. H. I. E. L. D. cinematic universe – is the absolute restraint the movie shows in comparison to other superhero movies. Character evolution is more defined here, what with arcs of Nick Fury, Steve Rogers, Black Widow and the Winter Soldier turning out more full-blooded than you’d expect. The people who thought there were a couple of unanswered questions still pending in the movies centred around the pre-Avengers universe have a couple of dots connected here in a very subtle manner. The only thing that lets it down is the under-inclusion of the titular antagonist. Now I’m half-predicting this to be a move that serves as a stepping stone to what might come through in the future (and you’ll know why once you’ve seen both the films), but as a standalone flick, there will be a set of audience that might question the relevance of its antagonist in the whole picture.

[The movie shows] absolute restraint in comparison to other superhero movies.Ankit Ojha

Technically, the movie is supported by stunning cinematography which definitely gives the whole film a very classic, eighties feel. Steady shot-taking and camera movements through 70 percent of the film help the audience absorb a lot of the said atmosphere in. Even better? Most of the action sequences are shot with less and less use of the now rampant handheld-camerawork gimmick. That’s not to say this is completely banished – it’s used sparingly; which is not a bad thing. The action sequences themselves are stunningly choreographed, with the makers making use of more practical choreography than visual effects. This itself, for a superhero flick, is a dynamic move to adopt. Again, it’s not that visual effects are completely scrapped off; they’re also used only when needed. Production design is a charm, combining the heavy-handed old-world with futuristic minimalism pretty well. And finally, the music definitely takes the cake. Mixing an orchestrated feel with electronic undertones works big time in support of the enhancement of each scene, be it action or drama.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

"I'm so badass; I don't even need to try."

“I’m so badass; I don’t even need to try.”

Chris Evans definitely manages to pull of the (now highly multi-layered) role of Steve Rogers with uncanny ease. This should definitely be stemming from the confidence of having played the character in the previous instalments of the Marvel movie universe. Here, however, he’s already given a character that’s now ready to go in different directions. Never for once does his body language waver of that of Captain America; this definitely helps the character to pop out and feel consistent. Scarlett Johansson’s Natasha Romanoff gets more character exposure here in comparison to Iron Man 2 and The Avengers. The audience gets to know her better as a person; as someone who more than just kicks serious butt and chuckles. Samuel Jackson as Nick Fury is his usual cool self. We’ve found a more vulnerable Fury here, and part of the successful exploitation of the character’s human element is due to Jackson’s dynamic performance. Robert Redford as Alexander Pierce is terrific. His mere screen presence holds a lot. The actor playing “The Winter Soldier” has fun with the multi-dimensional aspects of his character’s psyche and past. Revealing the actor here would probably spoil it for people who haven’t watched this movie yet, so I’ll end it with this ambiguous description. Cobie Smulders as Maria Hill is fun in her short role. It would definitely be hard, however, to shake off her “Robin” tag all too soon. Emily VanCamp seemed real good fun. This writer would have definitely wanted her role to be bigger; her character had potential to be made some fun with. Frank Grillo does well. Anthony Mackie as Falcon provides the bit of humour and character support that would otherwise be lacking in the film. His character, however, isn’t limited to just those things – and that’s a really good sign. He gets more to do, and Mackie supports his goals through the end pretty well.

WORTH IT?

Oh, definitely. And I really mean it. This movie is by far one of the most grounded, effectively paced and full-blooded superhero movies to come out of the franchise. With practical action sequences, timely exploitation of S. H. I. E. L. D.’s core characters and connectivity being a strong point here, the movie delivers way more than it has promised. Had the titular antagonist received more exposure, this movie would be able to justify its title (and vice versa). That snag aside, this is definitely one of the most consistent superhero/action films to have come out in recent times; a must watch for a majorly universal audience without any major spoon-feeding done. Highly recommended.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Evans
Scarlett Johansson
Anthony Mackie
Frank Grillo
Cobie Smulders

Written by

Christopher Markus
Stephen McFeely

Directed by

Anthony Russo
Joe Russo



WHAT TO EXPECT

Sequels are never supposed to be good, right? People who have seen The First Avenger obviously then wouldn’t have too much to expect, really. Sure, it was a good film, but objectively, you’ve got to agree with the writer of this review, that a gratuitously large amount of time was spent building character, with most of the closing action looking hurried – and vaguely montage-ish. Not that character buildup is a bad thing. Marvel’s counterparts X-Men: First Class and Iron Man definitely pay a lot of attention to equal doses of action, drama and character, in which case this franchise’s first installment didn’t make the cut. The Avengers definitely helped the character to an extent, although the attention almost always went to Loki, the Incredible Hulk, Natasha Romanoff or Iron Man, leaving the Chris Evans helmed role sidelined with Hawkeye. Why then, would the potential viewer want to watch this movie? This writer can definitely think of three reasons why:

  • The film receives a new lease of life with the change of directors on board;
  • Post The Avengers, we’ve got S. H. I. E. L. D. featured prominently, from what we know of the trailers; and
  • The titular antagonist definitely looks like he can kick the rear-ends of people who stand against him

So what are the problems, then, with the film? The Russo brothers – for reasons fortunate or unfortunate – have their last directorial effort to have been You, Me and Dupree. Additionally, the past few post-Avengers releases (Iron Man 3Thor: The Dark World) have generated nothing but mixed signals (although this writer does personally love Iron Man 3). What thus, does one expect to get from the film? That’s only to be known by walking through the unknown.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Steve Rogers, a. k. a. Captain America, is slowly getting to know S. H. I. E. L. D., but that certainly doesn’t mean he’s liking what he’s seeing. This apart from the fact that he seems to be trusting his own less and less. What he doesn’t know is he’s only witnessed part of a Domino-effect that just began, and might just bring the world down.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

"So basically, I have to use the shield to protect myself from The S.H.I.E.L.D? Damn"

“So basically, I have to use the shield to protect myself from The S.H.I.E.L.D? Damn”

There are a lot of reasons why this writer continues to have an absolutely neutral set of feelings for the first film; starting off with the slightly sickly xenophobia, continuing off (at the risk of repeating myself) with overdrawn character development, and reducing most of the buildup to weird elliptical (montage-like) scenes. Of course, the advantage the Russo brothers have over Johnston is that the protagonist doesn’t require any introduction per se, thanks to The First Avenger and – to quite some extent – The Avengers. What, however, makes this movie way different from it’s previous instalment – and other subsequent Marvel movies centring around the S. H. I. E. L. D. cinematic universe – is the absolute restraint the movie shows in comparison to other superhero movies. Character evolution is more defined here, what with arcs of Nick Fury, Steve Rogers, Black Widow and the Winter Soldier turning out more full-blooded than you’d expect. The people who thought there were a couple of unanswered questions still pending in the movies centred around the pre-Avengers universe have a couple of dots connected here in a very subtle manner. The only thing that lets it down is the under-inclusion of the titular antagonist. Now I’m half-predicting this to be a move that serves as a stepping stone to what might come through in the future (and you’ll know why once you’ve seen both the films), but as a standalone flick, there will be a set of audience that might question the relevance of its antagonist in the whole picture.

[The movie shows] absolute restraint in comparison to other superhero movies.Ankit Ojha

Technically, the movie is supported by stunning cinematography which definitely gives the whole film a very classic, eighties feel. Steady shot-taking and camera movements through 70 percent of the film help the audience absorb a lot of the said atmosphere in. Even better? Most of the action sequences are shot with less and less use of the now rampant handheld-camerawork gimmick. That’s not to say this is completely banished – it’s used sparingly; which is not a bad thing. The action sequences themselves are stunningly choreographed, with the makers making use of more practical choreography than visual effects. This itself, for a superhero flick, is a dynamic move to adopt. Again, it’s not that visual effects are completely scrapped off; they’re also used only when needed. Production design is a charm, combining the heavy-handed old-world with futuristic minimalism pretty well. And finally, the music definitely takes the cake. Mixing an orchestrated feel with electronic undertones works big time in support of the enhancement of each scene, be it action or drama.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

"I'm so badass; I don't even need to try."

“I’m so badass; I don’t even need to try.”

Chris Evans definitely manages to pull of the (now highly multi-layered) role of Steve Rogers with uncanny ease. This should definitely be stemming from the confidence of having played the character in the previous instalments of the Marvel movie universe. Here, however, he’s already given a character that’s now ready to go in different directions. Never for once does his body language waver of that of Captain America; this definitely helps the character to pop out and feel consistent. Scarlett Johansson’s Natasha Romanoff gets more character exposure here in comparison to Iron Man 2 and The Avengers. The audience gets to know her better as a person; as someone who more than just kicks serious butt and chuckles. Samuel Jackson as Nick Fury is his usual cool self. We’ve found a more vulnerable Fury here, and part of the successful exploitation of the character’s human element is due to Jackson’s dynamic performance. Robert Redford as Alexander Pierce is terrific. His mere screen presence holds a lot. The actor playing “The Winter Soldier” has fun with the multi-dimensional aspects of his character’s psyche and past. Revealing the actor here would probably spoil it for people who haven’t watched this movie yet, so I’ll end it with this ambiguous description. Cobie Smulders as Maria Hill is fun in her short role. It would definitely be hard, however, to shake off her “Robin” tag all too soon. Emily VanCamp seemed real good fun. This writer would have definitely wanted her role to be bigger; her character had potential to be made some fun with. Frank Grillo does well. Anthony Mackie as Falcon provides the bit of humour and character support that would otherwise be lacking in the film. His character, however, isn’t limited to just those things – and that’s a really good sign. He gets more to do, and Mackie supports his goals through the end pretty well.

WORTH IT?

Oh, definitely. And I really mean it. This movie is by far one of the most grounded, effectively paced and full-blooded superhero movies to come out of the franchise. With practical action sequences, timely exploitation of S. H. I. E. L. D.’s core characters and connectivity being a strong point here, the movie delivers way more than it has promised. Had the titular antagonist received more exposure, this movie would be able to justify its title (and vice versa). That snag aside, this is definitely one of the most consistent superhero/action films to have come out in recent times; a must watch for a majorly universal audience without any major spoon-feeding done. Highly recommended.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Chris Evans
Scarlett Johansson
Anthony Mackie
Director Anthony Russo
Joe Russo
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

WHAT TO EXPECT

Sequels are never supposed to be good, right? People who have seen The First Avenger obviously then wouldn’t have too much to expect, really. Sure, it was a good film, but objectively, you’ve got to agree with the writer of this review, that a gratuitously large amount of time was spent building character, with most of the closing action looking hurried – and vaguely montage-ish. Not that character buildup is a bad thing. Marvel’s counterparts X-Men: First Class and Iron Man definitely pay a lot of attention to equal doses of action, drama and character, in which case this franchise’s first installment didn’t make the cut. The Avengers definitely helped the character to an extent, although the attention almost always went to Loki, the Incredible Hulk, Natasha Romanoff or Iron Man, leaving the Chris Evans helmed role sidelined with Hawkeye. Why then, would the potential viewer want to watch this movie? This writer can definitely think of three reasons why:

  • The film receives a new lease of life with the change of directors on board;
  • Post The Avengers, we’ve got S. H. I. E. L. D. featured prominently, from what we know of the trailers; and
  • The titular antagonist definitely looks like he can kick the rear-ends of people who stand against him

So what are the problems, then, with the film? The Russo brothers – for reasons fortunate or unfortunate – have their last directorial effort to have been You, Me and Dupree. Additionally, the past few post-Avengers releases (Iron Man 3Thor: The Dark World) have generated nothing but mixed signals (although this writer does personally love Iron Man 3). What thus, does one expect to get from the film? That’s only to be known by walking through the unknown.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Steve Rogers, a. k. a. Captain America, is slowly getting to know S. H. I. E. L. D., but that certainly doesn’t mean he’s liking what he’s seeing. This apart from the fact that he seems to be trusting his own less and less. What he doesn’t know is he’s only witnessed part of a Domino-effect that just began, and might just bring the world down.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

"So basically, I have to use the shield to protect myself from The S.H.I.E.L.D? Damn"

“So basically, I have to use the shield to protect myself from The S.H.I.E.L.D? Damn”

There are a lot of reasons why this writer continues to have an absolutely neutral set of feelings for the first film; starting off with the slightly sickly xenophobia, continuing off (at the risk of repeating myself) with overdrawn character development, and reducing most of the buildup to weird elliptical (montage-like) scenes. Of course, the advantage the Russo brothers have over Johnston is that the protagonist doesn’t require any introduction per se, thanks to The First Avenger and – to quite some extent – The Avengers. What, however, makes this movie way different from it’s previous instalment – and other subsequent Marvel movies centring around the S. H. I. E. L. D. cinematic universe – is the absolute restraint the movie shows in comparison to other superhero movies. Character evolution is more defined here, what with arcs of Nick Fury, Steve Rogers, Black Widow and the Winter Soldier turning out more full-blooded than you’d expect. The people who thought there were a couple of unanswered questions still pending in the movies centred around the pre-Avengers universe have a couple of dots connected here in a very subtle manner. The only thing that lets it down is the under-inclusion of the titular antagonist. Now I’m half-predicting this to be a move that serves as a stepping stone to what might come through in the future (and you’ll know why once you’ve seen both the films), but as a standalone flick, there will be a set of audience that might question the relevance of its antagonist in the whole picture.

[The movie shows] absolute restraint in comparison to other superhero movies.Ankit Ojha

Technically, the movie is supported by stunning cinematography which definitely gives the whole film a very classic, eighties feel. Steady shot-taking and camera movements through 70 percent of the film help the audience absorb a lot of the said atmosphere in. Even better? Most of the action sequences are shot with less and less use of the now rampant handheld-camerawork gimmick. That’s not to say this is completely banished – it’s used sparingly; which is not a bad thing. The action sequences themselves are stunningly choreographed, with the makers making use of more practical choreography than visual effects. This itself, for a superhero flick, is a dynamic move to adopt. Again, it’s not that visual effects are completely scrapped off; they’re also used only when needed. Production design is a charm, combining the heavy-handed old-world with futuristic minimalism pretty well. And finally, the music definitely takes the cake. Mixing an orchestrated feel with electronic undertones works big time in support of the enhancement of each scene, be it action or drama.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

"I'm so badass; I don't even need to try."

“I’m so badass; I don’t even need to try.”

Chris Evans definitely manages to pull of the (now highly multi-layered) role of Steve Rogers with uncanny ease. This should definitely be stemming from the confidence of having played the character in the previous instalments of the Marvel movie universe. Here, however, he’s already given a character that’s now ready to go in different directions. Never for once does his body language waver of that of Captain America; this definitely helps the character to pop out and feel consistent. Scarlett Johansson’s Natasha Romanoff gets more character exposure here in comparison to Iron Man 2 and The Avengers. The audience gets to know her better as a person; as someone who more than just kicks serious butt and chuckles. Samuel Jackson as Nick Fury is his usual cool self. We’ve found a more vulnerable Fury here, and part of the successful exploitation of the character’s human element is due to Jackson’s dynamic performance. Robert Redford as Alexander Pierce is terrific. His mere screen presence holds a lot. The actor playing “The Winter Soldier” has fun with the multi-dimensional aspects of his character’s psyche and past. Revealing the actor here would probably spoil it for people who haven’t watched this movie yet, so I’ll end it with this ambiguous description. Cobie Smulders as Maria Hill is fun in her short role. It would definitely be hard, however, to shake off her “Robin” tag all too soon. Emily VanCamp seemed real good fun. This writer would have definitely wanted her role to be bigger; her character had potential to be made some fun with. Frank Grillo does well. Anthony Mackie as Falcon provides the bit of humour and character support that would otherwise be lacking in the film. His character, however, isn’t limited to just those things – and that’s a really good sign. He gets more to do, and Mackie supports his goals through the end pretty well.

WORTH IT?

Oh, definitely. And I really mean it. This movie is by far one of the most grounded, effectively paced and full-blooded superhero movies to come out of the franchise. With practical action sequences, timely exploitation of S. H. I. E. L. D.’s core characters and connectivity being a strong point here, the movie delivers way more than it has promised. Had the titular antagonist received more exposure, this movie would be able to justify its title (and vice versa). That snag aside, this is definitely one of the most consistent superhero/action films to have come out in recent times; a must watch for a majorly universal audience without any major spoon-feeding done. Highly recommended.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Chris Evans
Scarlett Johansson
Anthony Mackie
Director Anthony Russo
Joe Russo
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

WHAT TO EXPECT

Sequels are never supposed to be good, right? People who have seen The First Avenger obviously then wouldn’t have too much to expect, really. Sure, it was a good film, but objectively, you’ve got to agree with the writer of this review, that a gratuitously large amount of time was spent building character, with most of the closing action looking hurried – and vaguely montage-ish. Not that character buildup is a bad thing. Marvel’s counterparts X-Men: First Class and Iron Man definitely pay a lot of attention to equal doses of action, drama and character, in which case this franchise’s first installment didn’t make the cut. The Avengers definitely helped the character to an extent, although the attention almost always went to Loki, the Incredible Hulk, Natasha Romanoff or Iron Man, leaving the Chris Evans helmed role sidelined with Hawkeye. Why then, would the potential viewer want to watch this movie? This writer can definitely think of three reasons why:

  • The film receives a new lease of life with the change of directors on board;
  • Post The Avengers, we’ve got S. H. I. E. L. D. featured prominently, from what we know of the trailers; and
  • The titular antagonist definitely looks like he can kick the rear-ends of people who stand against him

So what are the problems, then, with the film? The Russo brothers – for reasons fortunate or unfortunate – have their last directorial effort to have been You, Me and Dupree. Additionally, the past few post-Avengers releases (Iron Man 3Thor: The Dark World) have generated nothing but mixed signals (although this writer does personally love Iron Man 3). What thus, does one expect to get from the film? That’s only to be known by walking through the unknown.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Steve Rogers, a. k. a. Captain America, is slowly getting to know S. H. I. E. L. D., but that certainly doesn’t mean he’s liking what he’s seeing. This apart from the fact that he seems to be trusting his own less and less. What he doesn’t know is he’s only witnessed part of a Domino-effect that just began, and might just bring the world down.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

There are a lot of reasons why this writer continues to have an absolutely neutral set of feelings for the first film; starting off with the slightly sickly xenophobia, continuing off (at the risk of repeating myself) with overdrawn character development, and reducing most of the buildup to weird elliptical (montage-like) scenes. Of course, the advantage the Russo brothers have over Johnston is that the protagonist doesn’t require any introduction per se, thanks to The First Avenger and – to quite some extent – The Avengers. What, however, makes this movie way different from it’s previous instalment – and other subsequent Marvel movies centring around the S. H. I. E. L. D. cinematic universe – is the absolute restraint the movie shows in comparison to other superhero movies. Character evolution is more defined here, what with arcs of Nick Fury, Steve Rogers, Black Widow and the Winter Soldier turning out more full-blooded than you’d expect. The people who thought there were a couple of unanswered questions still pending in the movies centred around the pre-Avengers universe have a couple of dots connected here in a very subtle manner. The only thing that lets it down is the under-inclusion of the titular antagonist. Now I’m half-predicting this to be a move that serves as a stepping stone to what might come through in the future (and you’ll know why once you’ve seen both the films), but as a standalone flick, there will be a set of audience that might question the relevance of its antagonist in the whole picture.

[The movie shows] absolute restraint in comparison to other superhero movies.Ankit Ojha

Technically, the movie is supported by stunning cinematography which definitely gives the whole film a very classic, eighties feel. Steady shot-taking and camera movements through 70 percent of the film help the audience absorb a lot of the said atmosphere in. Even better? Most of the action sequences are shot with less and less use of the now rampant handheld-camerawork gimmick. That’s not to say this is completely banished – it’s used sparingly; which is not a bad thing. The action sequences themselves are stunningly choreographed, with the makers making use of more practical choreography than visual effects. This itself, for a superhero flick, is a dynamic move to adopt. Again, it’s not that visual effects are completely scrapped off; they’re also used only when needed. Production design is a charm, combining the heavy-handed old-world with futuristic minimalism pretty well. And finally, the music definitely takes the cake. Mixing an orchestrated feel with electronic undertones works big time in support of the enhancement of each scene, be it action or drama.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Chris Evans definitely manages to pull of the (now highly multi-layered) role of Steve Rogers with uncanny ease. This should definitely be stemming from the confidence of having played the character in the previous instalments of the Marvel movie universe. Here, however, he’s already given a character that’s now ready to go in different directions. Never for once does his body language waver of that of Captain America; this definitely helps the character to pop out and feel consistent. Scarlett Johansson’s Natasha Romanoff gets more character exposure here in comparison to Iron Man 2 and The Avengers. The audience gets to know her better as a person; as someone who more than just kicks serious butt and chuckles. Samuel Jackson as Nick Fury is his usual cool self. We’ve found a more vulnerable Fury here, and part of the successful exploitation of the character’s human element is due to Jackson’s dynamic performance. Robert Redford as Alexander Pierce is terrific. His mere screen presence holds a lot. The actor playing “The Winter Soldier” has fun with the multi-dimensional aspects of his character’s psyche and past. Revealing the actor here would probably spoil it for people who haven’t watched this movie yet, so I’ll end it with this ambiguous description. Cobie Smulders as Maria Hill is fun in her short role. It would definitely be hard, however, to shake off her “Robin” tag all too soon. Emily VanCamp seemed real good fun. This writer would have definitely wanted her role to be bigger; her character had potential to be made some fun with. Frank Grillo does well. Anthony Mackie as Falcon provides the bit of humour and character support that would otherwise be lacking in the film. His character, however, isn’t limited to just those things – and that’s a really good sign. He gets more to do, and Mackie supports his goals through the end pretty well.

WORTH IT?

Oh, definitely. And I really mean it. This movie is by far one of the most grounded, effectively paced and full-blooded superhero movies to come out of the franchise. With practical action sequences, timely exploitation of S. H. I. E. L. D.’s core characters and connectivity being a strong point here, the movie delivers way more than it has promised. Had the titular antagonist received more exposure, this movie would be able to justify its title (and vice versa). That snag aside, this is definitely one of the most consistent superhero/action films to have come out in recent times; a must watch for a majorly universal audience without any major spoon-feeding done. Highly recommended.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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