COLOSSAL

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Nacho Vigalondo is an unafraid storyteller. Proving to his audience—even in his weaker efforts like Open Windows—that he has the gall to approach the unapproached; take the road not taken.

This is exactly why Colossal is a film worth expecting something out of, even if it does run the risk of being Vigalondo’s second shaky film. But with a cast like Anne Hathaway (Song One), Dan Stevens (television’s Legion), and Jason Sudeikis (Sleeping with Other People), the expectations only get higher, and the curiosity dangerously deeper.

Quite thankfully, the expectations aren’t all misplaced.

THE MOVIE

Ms. AA & Mr. Nice Guy

Handling the subject of abuse within the confines of a fictional narrative—one’d presume—might just be quite the steep Stairway to Hell for storytellers more often than not. From excellent dramas like the Academy Award nominated Room to the surprisingly effective Netflix Original series Jessica Jones, its portrayal has—time and again—taken many different forms. It’d be quite juvenile of us as an audience, then, to presume Vigalondo to follow suit, considering even his weakest film in his otherwise spotless repertoire attempted to turn an entire storytelling technique—the found footage thriller—on its head with Open Windows.

It’s no surprise, thus, that Colossal boldly addresses issues around the spectrum by way of—you’ll want to sit down for this—kaiju. As unsubtle as it is refreshingly inventive, the director marries dark comedy, psychological drama and monster movie to create a spellbinding hybrid that creeps up on its viewers before they know what hit them. It kicks off with a deceptively simplistic conflict—viewers meet a disheveled Gloria, a hot-mess of a human whose alcoholism leads to her boyfriend dumping and kicking her off his house. During this first half-hour, the film moves at the pace of your Friendly Neighborhood Indie Romantic Dramedy. The frustrating loyalty to its tropes is deliberate—the film wants you to sink it all in; maybe let your guard down a little.

[Vigalondo] marries dark comedy, psychological drama and monster movie to create a spellbinding hybrid that creeps up on its viewers before they know what hit them.ANKIT OJHA

This is when the film, straight out of leftfield, morphs into a monster movie. Except, as we’ve all gotten to know by now, Vigalondo doesn’t exactly play by the rules. And that is the film’s biggest virtue. Through the excellent performances of Hathway and Sudeikis, Vigalondo’s effective storytelling rears many an ugly head, and—much like Get Out—deals with the most uncomfortable issues of abuse, both domestic and emotional, and male entitlement by mixing fear and humor with its writer’s trademark dexterity. Hathway gives an edge to her protagonist’s cynicism and vulnerability, thereby giving an unsurprisingly excellent performance. The biggest surprise, however, is Jason Sudeikis. In its initial reels, the Saturday Night Live alumnus looks perfectly at home being the cocky-awkward Nice Guy prorotype. Halfway into the movie though, in a bizarre twist, is where his character gets a whole lot more interesting—and a dangerously tricky one to pull off. His confidence and utmost conviction, however, makes it look all too effortless and organic.

Insignificant no more

VERDICT

Genre benders are hard to pull off; even more so when they’re meticulously layered with some fascinating—if nightmarishly real—anthropological commentary. Nacho Vigalondo’s Colossal, a film that’s equal parts indie rom-com and monster flick, is a finely crafted mélange that effectively doubles as an Open Window to mental illness, abuse—both physical and emotional—and toxic masculinity.

This delicious “monster” of a black comedy deserves all your attention. And your money.

Watch the trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Star Rating:

Plot

A monster attacks Seoul every night—making a return almost decades after its first visit. Little does anyone know, however, that these otherworldly events are connected to an unassuming alcoholic who’s just returned to her hometown in Maine after a breakup.

Cast

Anne Hathaway
Jason Sudeikis
Dan Stevens

Director

Nacho Vigalondo

Rated

R

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Anne Hathaway
Jason Sudeikis
Dan Stevens
Director Nacho Vigalondo
Star Rating

THE PLOT

A monster attacks Seoul every night—making a return almost decades after its first visit. Little does anyone know, however, that these otherworldly events are connected to an unassuming alcoholic who’s just returned to her hometown in Maine after a breakup.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Nacho Vigalondo is an unafraid storyteller. Proving to his audience—even in his weaker efforts like Open Windows—that he has the gall to approach the unapproached; take the road not taken.

This is exactly why Colossal is a film worth expecting something out of, even if it does run the risk of being Vigalondo’s second shaky film. But with a cast like Anne Hathaway (Song One), Dan Stevens (television’s Legion), and Jason Sudeikis (Sleeping with Other People), the expectations only get higher, and the curiosity dangerously deeper.

Quite thankfully, the expectations aren’t all misplaced.

THE MOVIE

Ms. AA & Mr. Nice Guy

Handling the subject of abuse within the confines of a fictional narrative—one’d presume—might just be quite the steep Stairway to Hell for storytellers more often than not. From excellent dramas like the Academy Award nominated Room to the surprisingly effective Netflix Original series Jessica Jones, its portrayal has—time and again—taken many different forms. It’d be quite juvenile of us as an audience, then, to presume Vigalondo to follow suit, considering even his weakest film in his otherwise spotless repertoire attempted to turn an entire storytelling technique—the found footage thriller—on its head with Open Windows.

It’s no surprise, thus, that Colossal boldly addresses issues around the spectrum by way of—you’ll want to sit down for this—kaiju. As unsubtle as it is refreshingly inventive, the director marries dark comedy, psychological drama and monster movie to create a spellbinding hybrid that creeps up on its viewers before they know what hit them. It kicks off with a deceptively simplistic conflict—viewers meet a disheveled Gloria, a hot-mess of a human whose alcoholism leads to her boyfriend dumping and kicking her off his house. During this first half-hour, the film moves at the pace of your Friendly Neighborhood Indie Romantic Dramedy. The frustrating loyalty to its tropes is deliberate—the film wants you to sink it all in; maybe let your guard down a little.

[Vigalondo] marries dark comedy, psychological drama and monster movie to create a spellbinding hybrid that creeps up on its viewers before they know what hit them.ANKIT OJHA

This is when the film, straight out of leftfield, morphs into a monster movie. Except, as we’ve all gotten to know by now, Vigalondo doesn’t exactly play by the rules. And that is the film’s biggest virtue. Through the excellent performances of Hathway and Sudeikis, Vigalondo’s effective storytelling rears many an ugly head, and—much like Get Out—deals with the most uncomfortable issues of abuse, both domestic and emotional, and male entitlement by mixing fear and humor with its writer’s trademark dexterity. Hathway gives an edge to her protagonist’s cynicism and vulnerability, thereby giving an unsurprisingly excellent performance. The biggest surprise, however, is Jason Sudeikis. In its initial reels, the Saturday Night Live alumnus looks perfectly at home being the cocky-awkward Nice Guy prorotype. Halfway into the movie though, in a bizarre twist, is where his character gets a whole lot more interesting—and a dangerously tricky one to pull off. His confidence and utmost conviction, however, makes it look all too effortless and organic.

Insignificant no more

VERDICT

Genre benders are hard to pull off; even more so when they’re meticulously layered with some fascinating—if nightmarishly real—anthropological commentary. Nacho Vigalondo’s Colossal, a film that’s equal parts indie rom-com and monster flick, is a finely crafted mélange that effectively doubles as an Open Window to mental illness, abuse—both physical and emotional—and toxic masculinity.

This delicious “monster” of a black comedy deserves all your attention. And your money.

Watch trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Share this Post