Criminal

Tolerable stagnancy


Movie title here

  • Tolerable stagnancy

Criminal

  • Tolerable stagnancy


Rated

R

Starring

Kevin Costner
Gary Oldman
Tommy Lee Jones
Gal Gadot
Jordi Mollà

Written by

Douglas Cook
David Weisberg

Directed by

Ariel Vromen



What to Expect

So let us all get this straight: we’re presented an allegedly delayed film written by (the late) Douglas Cook, along with his writing partner David Weinberg hitting the cinemas. Their only claim-to-fame is The Rock, which was their (and Michael Bay’s) only decently-received film. Sure, it’s another story that The Rock might not have aged that well, but let’s just move on, shall we?

If there’s anything else to expect before one does indeed go ahead to watch the movie, it would be the casting coup of Kevin Costner, Tommy Lee Jones, and Gary Oldman—all of whom are back together for the second time on the big screen almost fifteen years after Oliver Stone’s JFK. Add to this the redeemed selves that Gal Gadot and Ryan Reynolds are, and you’re now with enough to pique your interest.

But the director has promise, right? Sure, if we consider the lukewarmly received The Iceman to be the focus of his career. Criminal looks like the first top-billing, mainstream movie he’s directing, and nobody knows what to expect out of it. It looks jaded, feels jaded and has nowhere to go.

What’s it About?

In a risqué experiment, a deceased agent’s memories are transferred to Jericho (Kevin Costner; Man of Steel), a sociopathic criminal, to track down and secure a vital software that could make or break the world.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Fearing memories

Fearing memories

One of the rather impressive aspects of the film is Vromen’s utilization of emotional relevance where he’s able to. There are many moments when the film stops being a madcap action thriller and instead focusses on establishing the agent we’re shown in its first ten minutes. He’s survived by a wife and a daughter, and his memories—or simply how Costner’s criminal gathers those fragments we’re shown—give Jericho a new lease of life. The criminal isn’t redeemed immediately after the experiment is over; it happens over time, in an attempt to make the proceedings more organic. Also, the explosions look damn gorgeous.

But then, that really cannot support the entire movie. It just can’t.

Sure, the slow-burn (at the risk of repeating myself) does earn a brownie point, but that’s basically about it. Because as the viewers do end up gathering their thoughts on the film, they will, at the end of the day, realize that it is not more than just a rehash of different themes in different action movies in the past few decades. And this isn’t an entitled claim. The film feels like a weird twist on Face-Off, mixed, of course, with The Rock, among other movies.

Now this might not have been an issue, had it been treated in a way that was entertaining enough to keep viewers invested. Nothing about John Wick, if stripped down to bare essentials, is spectacular by any means. It then all boils down to how characters and events are treated and executed. Criminal mostly ends up never taking off more often than not. There sure is heart, but that can’t sail many of the contrivances through, simply because of how predictable everything is. It’s no gordian process to make a well-written crowd pleaser if one’s been in the industry for this long, really. The aforementioned Keanu Reeves starrer, among bigger films like the Jason Bourne franchise so far, Skyfall and the fifth film in the Mission:Impossible franchise only go to prove that mainstream movie viewers don’t need a tired treatment of a movie abound with cliches.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Oh god I'm gonna die aren't I?

Oh god I’m gonna die aren’t I?

But that’s not the only problem. More on this in a while, because let’s just focus on how Kevin Costner looks like he was really happy doing this. He’s a force of nature, and is one of the few people who manage to make an earnest attempt to push the film forward. There are many tics his character has, and Costner embodies each of them, passing his message across to the viewers strongly and successfully. Supporting him is Gal Gadot, whose screen-time may not be relevant, but she doesn’t let the viewers out of her sight simply because of how organic her presence is.

Coming back to the problems, say hello to the severely miscast Gary Oldman and Tommy Lee Jones. They give their all, but just how unsuitable they look to their characters manage to pop right through. Michael Pitt functionally plays a whistleblower, and his character stereotype brings him down. Speaking of stereotypes, there’s Jordi “I’m-The-Exotic-Bad-Guy” Mollà, who fits into his bracket so well, it’s almost unbearably predictable.

Oh and there’s also Ryan Reynolds in there. Just sayin’.

Worth it?

Wait for it till it’s out on Netflix or a similar streaming service. Or linear television. Once it is, wait till you have absolutely nothing to do; no movies worthy enough to watch in comparison. Once you’ve made sure most of your options are tapped out, watch this. It’s a very tolerable movie, but it’s not one worth your time, the price of a ticket, or the energy you’re going to spend making a trip to the cinemas—and yes, I say this despite the fact that it could be a five-minute walk.

So yeah, if you did watch this film on television on a dull and lazy night, it wouldn’t leave a bad taste in your mouth like many other made-for-home-viewing films would. (Remember Replicant starring Michael Rooker and Jean-Claude Van Damme? No? I do, and that stuff cannot be unseen). But as a cinema-going experience, save for a few silver linings, it just does not Rock.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Kevin Costner
Gary Oldman
Tommy Lee Jones
Gal Gadot
Jordi Mollà

Written by

Douglas Cook
David Weisberg

Directed by

Ariel Vromen



What to Expect

So let us all get this straight: we’re presented an allegedly delayed film written by (the late) Douglas Cook, along with his writing partner David Weinberg hitting the cinemas. Their only claim-to-fame is The Rock, which was their (and Michael Bay’s) only decently-received film. Sure, it’s another story that The Rock might not have aged that well, but let’s just move on, shall we?

If there’s anything else to expect before one does indeed go ahead to watch the movie, it would be the casting coup of Kevin Costner, Tommy Lee Jones, and Gary Oldman—all of whom are back together for the second time on the big screen almost fifteen years after Oliver Stone’s JFK. Add to this the redeemed selves that Gal Gadot and Ryan Reynolds are, and you’re now with enough to pique your interest.

But the director has promise, right? Sure, if we consider the lukewarmly received The Iceman to be the focus of his career. Criminal looks like the first top-billing, mainstream movie he’s directing, and nobody knows what to expect out of it. It looks jaded, feels jaded and has nowhere to go.

What’s it About?

In a risqué experiment, a deceased agent’s memories are transferred to Jericho (Kevin Costner; Man of Steel), a sociopathic criminal, to track down and secure a vital software that could make or break the world.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Fearing memories

Fearing memories

One of the rather impressive aspects of the film is Vromen’s utilization of emotional relevance where he’s able to. There are many moments when the film stops being a madcap action thriller and instead focusses on establishing the agent we’re shown in its first ten minutes. He’s survived by a wife and a daughter, and his memories—or simply how Costner’s criminal gathers those fragments we’re shown—give Jericho a new lease of life. The criminal isn’t redeemed immediately after the experiment is over; it happens over time, in an attempt to make the proceedings more organic. Also, the explosions look damn gorgeous.

But then, that really cannot support the entire movie. It just can’t.

Sure, the slow-burn (at the risk of repeating myself) does earn a brownie point, but that’s basically about it. Because as the viewers do end up gathering their thoughts on the film, they will, at the end of the day, realize that it is not more than just a rehash of different themes in different action movies in the past few decades. And this isn’t an entitled claim. The film feels like a weird twist on Face-Off, mixed, of course, with The Rock, among other movies.

Now this might not have been an issue, had it been treated in a way that was entertaining enough to keep viewers invested. Nothing about John Wick, if stripped down to bare essentials, is spectacular by any means. It then all boils down to how characters and events are treated and executed. Criminal mostly ends up never taking off more often than not. There sure is heart, but that can’t sail many of the contrivances through, simply because of how predictable everything is. It’s no gordian process to make a well-written crowd pleaser if one’s been in the industry for this long, really. The aforementioned Keanu Reeves starrer, among bigger films like the Jason Bourne franchise so far, Skyfall and the fifth film in the Mission:Impossible franchise only go to prove that mainstream movie viewers don’t need a tired treatment of a movie abound with cliches.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Oh god I'm gonna die aren't I?

Oh god I’m gonna die aren’t I?

But that’s not the only problem. More on this in a while, because let’s just focus on how Kevin Costner looks like he was really happy doing this. He’s a force of nature, and is one of the few people who manage to make an earnest attempt to push the film forward. There are many tics his character has, and Costner embodies each of them, passing his message across to the viewers strongly and successfully. Supporting him is Gal Gadot, whose screen-time may not be relevant, but she doesn’t let the viewers out of her sight simply because of how organic her presence is.

Coming back to the problems, say hello to the severely miscast Gary Oldman and Tommy Lee Jones. They give their all, but just how unsuitable they look to their characters manage to pop right through. Michael Pitt functionally plays a whistleblower, and his character stereotype brings him down. Speaking of stereotypes, there’s Jordi “I’m-The-Exotic-Bad-Guy” Mollà, who fits into his bracket so well, it’s almost unbearably predictable.

Oh and there’s also Ryan Reynolds in there. Just sayin’.

Worth it?

Wait for it till it’s out on Netflix or a similar streaming service. Or linear television. Once it is, wait till you have absolutely nothing to do; no movies worthy enough to watch in comparison. Once you’ve made sure most of your options are tapped out, watch this. It’s a very tolerable movie, but it’s not one worth your time, the price of a ticket, or the energy you’re going to spend making a trip to the cinemas—and yes, I say this despite the fact that it could be a five-minute walk.

So yeah, if you did watch this film on television on a dull and lazy night, it wouldn’t leave a bad taste in your mouth like many other made-for-home-viewing films would. (Remember Replicant starring Michael Rooker and Jean-Claude Van Damme? No? I do, and that stuff cannot be unseen). But as a cinema-going experience, save for a few silver linings, it just does not Rock.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Kevin Costner
Gary Oldman
Tommy Lee Jones
Director Ariel Vromen
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

Mind-Off

Mind-Off

So let us all get this straight: we’re presented an allegedly delayed film written by (the late) Douglas Cook, along with his writing partner David Weinberg hitting the cinemas. Their only claim-to-fame is The Rock, which was their (and Michael Bay’s) only decently-received film. Sure, it’s another story that The Rock might not have aged that well, but let’s just move on, shall we?

If there’s anything else to expect before one does indeed go ahead to watch the movie, it would be the casting coup of Kevin Costner, Tommy Lee Jones, and Gary Oldman—all of whom are back together for the second time on the big screen almost fifteen years after Oliver Stone’s JFK. Add to this the redeemed selves that Gal Gadot and Ryan Reynolds are, and you’re now with enough to pique your interest.

But the director has promise, right? Sure, if we consider the lukewarmly received The Iceman to be the focus of his career. Criminal looks like the first top-billing, mainstream movie he’s directing, and nobody knows what to expect out of it. It looks jaded, feels jaded and has nowhere to go.

What’s it About?

In a risqué experiment, a deceased agent’s memories are transferred to Jericho (Kevin Costner; Man of Steel), a sociopathic criminal, to track down and secure a vital software that could make or break the world.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Fearing memories

Fearing memories

One of the rather impressive aspects of the film is Vromen’s utilization of emotional relevance where he’s able to. There are many moments when the film stops being a madcap action thriller and instead focusses on establishing the agent we’re shown in its first ten minutes. He’s survived by a wife and a daughter, and his memories—or simply how Costner’s criminal gathers those fragments we’re shown—give Jericho a new lease of life. The criminal isn’t redeemed immediately after the experiment is over; it happens over time, in an attempt to make the proceedings more organic. Also, the explosions look damn gorgeous.

But then, that really cannot support the entire movie. It just can’t.

Sure, the slow-burn (at the risk of repeating myself) does earn a brownie point, but that’s basically about it. Because as the viewers do end up gathering their thoughts on the film, they will, at the end of the day, realize that it is not more than just a rehash of different themes in different action movies in the past few decades. And this isn’t an entitled claim. The film feels like a weird twist on Face-Off, mixed, of course, with The Rock, among other movies.

Now this might not have been an issue, had it been treated in a way that was entertaining enough to keep viewers invested. Nothing about John Wick, if stripped down to bare essentials, is spectacular by any means. It then all boils down to how characters and events are treated and executed. Criminal mostly ends up never taking off more often than not. There sure is heart, but that can’t sail many of the contrivances through, simply because of how predictable everything is. It’s no gordian process to make a well-written crowd pleaser if one’s been in the industry for this long, really. The aforementioned Keanu Reeves starrer, among bigger films like the Jason Bourne franchise so far, Skyfall and the fifth film in the Mission:Impossible franchise only go to prove that mainstream movie viewers don’t need a tired treatment of a movie abound with cliches.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Oh god I'm gonna die aren't I?

Oh god I’m gonna die aren’t I?

But that’s not the only problem. More on this in a while, because let’s just focus on how Kevin Costner looks like he was really happy doing this. He’s a force of nature, and is one of the few people who manage to make an earnest attempt to push the film forward. There are many tics his character has, and Costner embodies each of them, passing his message across to the viewers strongly and successfully. Supporting him is Gal Gadot, whose screen-time may not be relevant, but she doesn’t let the viewers out of her sight simply because of how organic her presence is.

Coming back to the problems, say hello to the severely miscast Gary Oldman and Tommy Lee Jones. They give their all, but just how unsuitable they look to their characters manage to pop right through. Michael Pitt functionally plays a whistleblower, and his character stereotype brings him down. Speaking of stereotypes, there’s Jordi “I’m-The-Exotic-Bad-Guy” Mollà, who fits into his bracket so well, it’s almost unbearably predictable.

Oh and there’s also Ryan Reynolds in there. Just sayin’.

Worth it?

Wait for it till it’s out on Netflix or a similar streaming service. Or linear television. Once it is, wait till you have absolutely nothing to do; no movies worthy enough to watch in comparison. Once you’ve made sure most of your options are tapped out, watch this. It’s a very tolerable movie, but it’s not one worth your time, the price of a ticket, or the energy you’re going to spend making a trip to the cinemas—and yes, I say this despite the fact that it could be a five-minute walk.

So yeah, if you did watch this film on television on a dull and lazy night, it wouldn’t leave a bad taste in your mouth like many other made-for-home-viewing films would. (Remember Replicant starring Michael Rooker and Jean-Claude Van Damme? No? I do, and that stuff cannot be unseen). But as a cinema-going experience, save for a few silver linings, it just does not Rock.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Kevin Costner
Gary Oldman
Tommy Lee Jones
Director Ariel Vromen
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

So let us all get this straight: we’re presented an allegedly delayed film written by (the late) Douglas Cook, along with his writing partner David Weinberg hitting the cinemas. Their only claim-to-fame is The Rock, which was their (and Michael Bay’s) only decently-received film. Sure, it’s another story that The Rock might not have aged that well, but let’s just move on, shall we?

If there’s anything else to expect before one does indeed go ahead to watch the movie, it would be the casting coup of Kevin Costner, Tommy Lee Jones, and Gary Oldman—all of whom are back together for the second time on the big screen almost fifteen years after Oliver Stone’s JFK. Add to this the redeemed selves that Gal Gadot and Ryan Reynolds are, and you’re now with enough to pique your interest.

But the director has promise, right? Sure, if we consider the lukewarmly received The Iceman to be the focus of his career. Criminal looks like the first top-billing, mainstream movie he’s directing, and nobody knows what to expect out of it. It looks jaded, feels jaded and has nowhere to go.

What’s it About?

In a risqué experiment, a deceased agent’s memories are transferred to Jericho (Kevin Costner; Man of Steel), a sociopathic criminal, to track down and secure a vital software that could make or break the world.

Fearing memories

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

One of the rather impressive aspects of the film is Vromen’s utilization of emotional relevance where he’s able to. There are many moments when the film stops being a madcap action thriller and instead focusses on establishing the agent we’re shown in its first ten minutes. He’s survived by a wife and a daughter, and his memories—or simply how Costner’s criminal gathers those fragments we’re shown—give Jericho a new lease of life. The criminal isn’t redeemed immediately after the experiment is over; it happens over time, in an attempt to make the proceedings more organic. Also, the explosions look damn gorgeous.

But then, that really cannot support the entire movie. It just can’t.

Sure, the slow-burn (at the risk of repeating myself) does earn a brownie point, but that’s basically about it. Because as the viewers do end up gathering their thoughts on the film, they will, at the end of the day, realize that it is not more than just a rehash of different themes in different action movies in the past few decades. And this isn’t an entitled claim. The film feels like a weird twist on Face-Off, mixed, of course, with The Rock, among other movies.

Now this might not have been an issue, had it been treated in a way that was entertaining enough to keep viewers invested. Nothing about John Wick, if stripped down to bare essentials, is spectacular by any means. It then all boils down to how characters and events are treated and executed. Criminal mostly ends up never taking off more often than not. There sure is heart, but that can’t sail many of the contrivances through, simply because of how predictable everything is. It’s no gordian process to make a well-written crowd pleaser if one’s been in the industry for this long, really. The aforementioned Keanu Reeves starrer, among bigger films like the Jason Bourne franchise so far, Skyfall and the fifth film in the Mission:Impossible franchise only go to prove that mainstream movie viewers don’t need a tired treatment of a movie abound with cliches.

Oh god I'm gonna die aren't I?

To Perform or Not to Perform

But that’s not the only problem. More on this in a while, because let’s just focus on how Kevin Costner looks like he was really happy doing this. He’s a force of nature, and is one of the few people who manage to make an earnest attempt to push the film forward. There are many tics his character has, and Costner embodies each of them, passing his message across to the viewers strongly and successfully. Supporting him is Gal Gadot, whose screen-time may not be relevant, but she doesn’t let the viewers out of her sight simply because of how organic her presence is.

Coming back to the problems, say hello to the severely miscast Gary Oldman and Tommy Lee Jones. They give their all, but just how unsuitable they look to their characters manage to pop right through. Michael Pitt functionally plays a whistleblower, and his character stereotype brings him down. Speaking of stereotypes, there’s Jordi “I’m-The-Exotic-Bad-Guy” Mollà, who fits into his bracket so well, it’s almost unbearably predictable.

Oh and there’s also Ryan Reynolds in there. Just sayin’.

Worth it?

Wait for it till it’s out on Netflix or a similar streaming service. Or linear television. Once it is, wait till you have absolutely nothing to do; no movies worthy enough to watch in comparison. Once you’ve made sure most of your options are tapped out, watch this. It’s a very tolerable movie, but it’s not one worth your time, the price of a ticket, or the energy you’re going to spend making a trip to the cinemas—and yes, I say this despite the fact that it could be a five-minute walk.

So yeah, if you did watch this film on television on a dull and lazy night, it wouldn’t leave a bad taste in your mouth like many other made-for-home-viewing films would. (Remember Replicant starring Michael Rooker and Jean-Claude Van Damme? No? I do, and that stuff cannot be unseen). But as a cinema-going experience, save for a few silver linings, it just does not Rock.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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