Deadpool

Time to make ’em kebabs!


Deadpool

  • Time to make ’em kebabs!

Deadpool

  • Time to make ’em kebabs!


Rated

R

Starring

Ryan Reynolds
Morena Baccarin
T. J. Miller
Ed Skrein
Gina Carano

Written by

Rhet Reese
Paul Wernick
Fabian Nicieza
Rob Liefeld

Directed by

Tim Miller



What to Expect

Deadpool has been fraught with a barrage of expectations—the sheer amount is frightening by a mile and a half. And don’t get this one wrong; the movie’s been doing everything right so far. The studio’s hired the best possible marketing team, giving the potential audience a bare-bones, honest tone of what they’re to expect out of the end-product that would then hit the cinemas.

Sure, but Deadpool in X-Men Origins: Wolverine-

Yeah, no. One’s to forget that wholly, if anything. Reynolds himself desperately wants to, if his various (refreshingly honest) interviews are a hint of anything. The current take on Deadpool’s an entirely fresh start to this possible superhero franchise that, if I’m super-frank, looks just fantastic.

No, really. It does. Dangerously grand.

What’s it About?

The movie’s about Deadpool (aka Wade Wilson, played by Ryan Reynolds) being Deadpool and saving his “main girl” from the “bad guy”.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Hi, it's me Deadpool.

Hi, it’s me Deadpool.

The opening titles—and might I just say, the best opening titles in what seems to be a while; brilliant compositing you guys—pave the way for the rest of the movie’s pitch perfect tone. The sarcasm and self-awareness aside, the film breaks the fourth wall ever-so-casually every time its titular character can grab the chance to. Now that’s cool, because, despite how regularly the makers have used the technique, its usage betrays little-to-no redundancy. And a lot of its credit goes to the writers, who seem to have just let go while forming the screenplay. Everything feels brash, fresh and a whole lotta fun (in a very organic way). Director of animation films Tim Miller’s first feature-length live-action film shows his focused interest and the undying passion he shares with Reynolds (who’s also a co-producer on this one) for the movie. His execution of the material lends an exceptionally fluid motion to its entirety, keeping the viewers invested for almost every moment of the film.

The film, for its genre, is supported by a relatively meager budget of $58 million. It’s just a notch higher than just a quarter of the budget of producer Simon Kinberg’s last successful superhero stint with X-Men: Days of Future Past (which he also wrote the screenplay for); a whopping $200 million film. It’s important to understand this, primarily because considering how much the makers had at hand (and had to make do with), the amount of focus the end-product boasts of is excellent. Making most of every penny they’ve got, the entire team manages to make a movie that just doesn’t seem to miss a beat for most of itself. Viewers are witness to incredibly composited CGI, fantastic action set-pieces, authentic production design, superior (and I meant that) cinematography, and excellent editing. Julian Clarke understands the rhythm of an action sequence, and, therefore, knows the technique of cutting between shots with just the right amount of pace and visual movement a particular final shot can capture.

But let’s not just get to the bare-bones basics; let’s also give Deadpool’s music supervisor some love. The movie’s runtime boasts of an eclectically curated soundtrack, featuring the likes of Angel of the Morning, used in hilariously ironic sync with the opening titles, all the way to George Michael’s Careless Whisper—my personal favorite when it comes to its usage in the movie. Oh, and Deadpool’s heavily marketed motif Shoop? Yeah, that’s there too, in all its glory. Oh yeah.

Show me some love.

Show me some love.

Reading all of this, you must think: this movie looks flawless! What could go wrong, hey? A few little things—yeah, nitpicks, those. But they’re quite legitimate, so hear me out (or read me out, because text, but if you hear a tiny voice in your head recite this text to you, then the expression works). Now, you’ve got a highly R-rated movie, and it’s highly profane, and just the opposite of watered down. Within this film, there’s a lot of envelope-pushing, and some of that aren’t just for the sake of humor. Viewers are presented with two very badass female characters, and one of them’s not a superhero (Morena Baccarin’s Vanessa, Wade’s girlfriend, isn’t exactly your average love-interest-101 woman, you see). Why is it, then, that we’re given the stereotypical Indian taxi driver we don’t need? A possible argument for that would be that the makers wanted almost everything in the end-product to reek of political incorrectness, which, to an extent, is quite valid. But we don’t need the heavy funnily accented guy when we already have decent comic support, do we now? And if we did, one would like to subject him to the same self-awareness that every other character has. Now if he knew he was playing off of stereotypes, that would ensure a lot more hilarity than is normal.

That’s not where the downers end, though. Considering Deadpool hits the nail on its head with its mostly refreshing narrative structure, why is it that we must excuse its sole self-unaware subplot? While everything about the Wade-Vanessa story is almost pitch perfect, the culmination of the plot-thread itself reeks of the kind of formula we don’t need in the movie. As a good friend of mine perfectly stated in our post-movie conversation, “Why fall back into the trap of the conventions you’re making fun of?” Take a few steps backward for a macro-view on it, and you’d agree too. Here’s why I call them nitpicks, though: because they are just nitpicks. Moreover, a majority of viewers just won’t care a damn about it; they’re going to be hella entertained by the perfectly timed gags that come at regular intervals and, of course, the fantastic action.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Or I'll just make a kebab outta you

Or I’ll just make a kebab outta you

Ryan Reynolds has played Deadpool before, and we all know how that turned out. It’s normal, thus, for viewers to have pre-movie trust issues (if they do have any; like has anyone witnessed the pitch-perfect marketing of this film?). You can leave your trust issues out of the door, though, because Reynolds nails it. He is just perfect. Playing off his strengths is Morena Baccarin, who is just awesome. Her confidence matches Reynold’s fast-talking wit, and they are terrific together. T. J. Miller isn’t too far behind. He’s hilarious in every scene, and though he doesn’t have a conventional punchline-set, he kills it with his deadpan conversational style. Ed Skrein redeems himself after the insipid The Transporter Refueled, and Gina Carano provides powerful antagonistic support.

Worth it?

Deadpool might have its flaws but is very high on the kind of entertainment value that isn’t necessarily dumbed down. This is that justifiably R-rated, fourth-wall breaking, reference-heavy, self-aware and self-deprecative superhero action-comedy the audience has rightfully deserved since time immemorial—and I mean it; I really do. One of the most entertaining mainstream live-action films to have come out this year, this one comes highly recommended.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Ryan Reynolds
Morena Baccarin
T. J. Miller
Ed Skrein
Gina Carano

Written by

Rhet Reese
Paul Wernick
Fabian Nicieza
Rob Liefeld

Directed by

Tim Miller



What to Expect

Deadpool has been fraught with a barrage of expectations—the sheer amount is frightening by a mile and a half. And don’t get this one wrong; the movie’s been doing everything right so far. The studio’s hired the best possible marketing team, giving the potential audience a bare-bones, honest tone of what they’re to expect out of the end-product that would then hit the cinemas.

Sure, but Deadpool in X-Men Origins: Wolverine-

Yeah, no. One’s to forget that wholly, if anything. Reynolds himself desperately wants to, if his various (refreshingly honest) interviews are a hint of anything. The current take on Deadpool’s an entirely fresh start to this possible superhero franchise that, if I’m super-frank, looks just fantastic.

No, really. It does. Dangerously grand.

What’s it About?

The movie’s about Deadpool (aka Wade Wilson, played by Ryan Reynolds) being Deadpool and saving his “main girl” from the “bad guy”.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Hi, it's me Deadpool.

Hi, it’s me Deadpool.

The opening titles—and might I just say, the best opening titles in what seems to be a while; brilliant compositing you guys—pave the way for the rest of the movie’s pitch perfect tone. The sarcasm and self-awareness aside, the film breaks the fourth wall ever-so-casually every time its titular character can grab the chance to. Now that’s cool, because, despite how regularly the makers have used the technique, its usage betrays little-to-no redundancy. And a lot of its credit goes to the writers, who seem to have just let go while forming the screenplay. Everything feels brash, fresh and a whole lotta fun (in a very organic way). Director of animation films Tim Miller’s first feature-length live-action film shows his focused interest and the undying passion he shares with Reynolds (who’s also a co-producer on this one) for the movie. His execution of the material lends an exceptionally fluid motion to its entirety, keeping the viewers invested for almost every moment of the film.

The film, for its genre, is supported by a relatively meager budget of $58 million. It’s just a notch higher than just a quarter of the budget of producer Simon Kinberg’s last successful superhero stint with X-Men: Days of Future Past (which he also wrote the screenplay for); a whopping $200 million film. It’s important to understand this, primarily because considering how much the makers had at hand (and had to make do with), the amount of focus the end-product boasts of is excellent. Making most of every penny they’ve got, the entire team manages to make a movie that just doesn’t seem to miss a beat for most of itself. Viewers are witness to incredibly composited CGI, fantastic action set-pieces, authentic production design, superior (and I meant that) cinematography, and excellent editing. Julian Clarke understands the rhythm of an action sequence, and, therefore, understands the technique of cutting between shots with just the right amount of pace and visual movement a particular final shot can capture.

But let’s not just get to the bare-bones basics; let’s also give Deadpool’s music supervisor some love. The movie’s runtime boasts of an eclectically curated soundtrack, featuring the likes of Angel of the Morning, used in hilariously ironic sync with the opening titles, all the way to George Michael’s Careless Whisper—my personal favorite when it comes to its usage in the movie. Oh, and Deadpool’s heavily marketed motif Shoop? Yeah, that’s there too, in all its glory. Oh yeah.

Show me some love.

Show me some love.

Reading all of this, you must think: this movie looks flawless! What could go wrong, hey? A few little things—yeah, nitpicks, those. But they’re quite legitimate, so hear me out (or read me out, because text, but if you hear a tiny voice in your head recite this text to you, then the expression works). Now, you’ve got a highly R-rated movie, and it’s highly profane, and just the opposite of watered down. Within this film, there’s a lot of envelope-pushing, and some of that aren’t just for the sake of humor. Viewers are presented with two very badass female characters, and one of them’s not a superhero (Morena Baccarin’s Vanessa, Wade’s girlfriend, isn’t exactly your average love-interest-101 woman, you see). Why is it, then, that we’re given  the stereotypical Indian taxi driver we don’t need? A possible argument for that would be that the makers wanted almost everything in the end-product to reek of political incorrectness, which, to an extent, is quite valid. But we don’t need the heavy funnily accented guy when we already have decent comic support, do we now? And if we did, one would like to subject him to the same self-awareness that every other character has. Now if he knew he was playing off of stereotypes, that would ensure a lot more hilarity than is normal.

That’s not where the downers end, though. Considering Deadpool hits the nail on its head with its mostly refreshing narrative structure, why is it that we must excuse its sole self-unaware subplot? While everything about the Wade-Vanessa story is almost pitch perfect, the culmination of the plot-thread itself reeks of the kind of formula we don’t need in the movie. As a good friend of mine perfectly stated in our post-movie conversation, “Why fall back into the trap of the conventions you’re actually making fun of?” Take a few steps backward for a macro-view on it, and you’d agree too. Here’s why I call them nitpicks though: because they actually are just nitpicks. Moreover, a majority of viewers just won’t care a damn about it; they’re going to be hella entertained by the perfectly timed gags that come at regular intervals and, of course, the fantastic action.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Or I'll just make a kebab outta you

Or I’ll just make a kebab outta you

Ryan Reynolds has played Deadpool before, and we all know how that turned out. It’s normal, thus, for viewers to have pre-movie trust issues (if they do have any; like has anyone witnessed the pitch-perfect marketing of this film?). You can leave your trust issues out of the door, though, because Reynolds nails it. He is just perfect. Playing off his strengths is Morena Baccarin, who is just awesome. Her confidence matches Reynold’s fast-talking wit, and they are terrific together. T. J. Miller isn’t too far behind. He’s hilarious in every scene, and though he doesn’t have a conventional punchline-set, he kills it with his deadpan conversational style. Ed Skrein redeems himself after the insipid The Transporter Refueled, and Gina Carano provides powerful antagonistic support.

Worth it?

Deadpool might have its flaws, but is very high on the kind of entertainment value that isn’t necessarily dumbed down. This is that justifiably R-rated, fourth-wall breaking, reference-heavy, self-aware and self-deprecative superhero action-comedy the audience has rightfully deserved since time immemorial—and I mean it; I really do. This is one of the most entertaining mainstream live-action films to have come out this year, and comes highly recommended.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Ryan Reynolds
Morena Baccarin
Ed Skrein
Director Tim Miller
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

The name is Pool. Deadpool.

The name is Pool. Deadpool.

Deadpool has been fraught with a barrage of expectations—the sheer amount is frightening by a mile and a half. And don’t get this one wrong; the movie’s been doing everything right so far. The studio’s hired the best possible marketing team, giving the potential audience a bare-bones, honest tone of what they’re to expect out of the end-product that would then hit the cinemas.

Sure, but Deadpool in X-Men Origins: Wolverine-

Yeah, no. One’s to forget that wholly, if anything. Reynolds himself desperately wants to, if his various (refreshingly honest) interviews are a hint of anything. The current take on Deadpool’s an entirely fresh start to this possible superhero franchise that, if I’m super-frank, looks just fantastic.

No, really. It does. Dangerously grand.

What’s it About?

The movie’s about Deadpool (aka Wade Wilson, played by Ryan Reynolds) being Deadpool and saving his “main girl” from the “bad guy”.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Hi, it's me Deadpool.

Hi, it’s me Deadpool.

The opening titles—and might I just say, the best opening titles in what seems to be a while; brilliant compositing you guys—pave the way for the rest of the movie’s pitch perfect tone. The sarcasm and self-awareness aside, the film breaks the fourth wall ever-so-casually every time its titular character can grab the chance to. Now that’s cool, because, despite how regularly the makers have used the technique, its usage betrays little-to-no redundancy. And a lot of its credit goes to the writers, who seem to have just let go while forming the screenplay. Everything feels brash, fresh and a whole lotta fun (in a very organic way). Director of animation films Tim Miller’s first feature-length live-action film shows his focused interest and the undying passion he shares with Reynolds (who’s also a co-producer on this one) for the movie. His execution of the material lends an exceptionally fluid motion to its entirety, keeping the viewers invested for almost every moment of the film.

The film, for its genre, is supported by a relatively meager budget of $58 million. It’s just a notch higher than just a quarter of the budget of producer Simon Kinberg’s last successful superhero stint with X-Men: Days of Future Past (which he also wrote the screenplay for); a whopping $200 million film. It’s important to understand this, primarily because considering how much the makers had at hand (and had to make do with), the amount of focus the end-product boasts of is excellent. Making most of every penny they’ve got, the entire team manages to make a movie that just doesn’t seem to miss a beat for most of itself. Viewers are witness to incredibly composited CGI, fantastic action set-pieces, authentic production design, superior (and I meant that) cinematography, and excellent editing. Julian Clarke understands the rhythm of an action sequence, and, therefore, knows the technique of cutting between shots with just the right amount of pace and visual movement a particular final shot can capture.

But let’s not just get to the bare-bones basics; let’s also give Deadpool’s music supervisor some love. The movie’s runtime boasts of an eclectically curated soundtrack, featuring the likes of Angel of the Morning, used in hilariously ironic sync with the opening titles, all the way to George Michael’s Careless Whisper—my personal favorite when it comes to its usage in the movie. Oh, and Deadpool’s heavily marketed motif Shoop? Yeah, that’s there too, in all its glory. Oh yeah.

Show me some love.

Show me some love.

Reading all of this, you must think: this movie looks flawless! What could go wrong, hey? A few little things—yeah, nitpicks, those. But they’re quite legitimate, so hear me out (or read me out, because text, but if you hear a tiny voice in your head recite this text to you, then the expression works). Now, you’ve got a highly R-rated movie, and it’s highly profane, and just the opposite of watered down. Within this film, there’s a lot of envelope-pushing, and some of that aren’t just for the sake of humor. Viewers are presented with two very badass female characters, and one of them’s not a superhero (Morena Baccarin’s Vanessa, Wade’s girlfriend, isn’t exactly your average love-interest-101 woman, you see). Why is it, then, that we’re given the stereotypical Indian taxi driver we don’t need? A possible argument for that would be that the makers wanted almost everything in the end-product to reek of political incorrectness, which, to an extent, is quite valid. But we don’t need the heavy funnily accented guy when we already have decent comic support, do we now? And if we did, one would like to subject him to the same self-awareness that every other character has. Now if he knew he was playing off of stereotypes, that would ensure a lot more hilarity than is normal.

That’s not where the downers end, though. Considering Deadpool hits the nail on its head with its mostly refreshing narrative structure, why is it that we must excuse its sole self-unaware subplot? While everything about the Wade-Vanessa story is almost pitch perfect, the culmination of the plot-thread itself reeks of the kind of formula we don’t need in the movie. As a good friend of mine perfectly stated in our post-movie conversation, “Why fall back into the trap of the conventions you’re making fun of?” Take a few steps backward for a macro-view on it, and you’d agree too. Here’s why I call them nitpicks, though: because they are just nitpicks. Moreover, a majority of viewers just won’t care a damn about it; they’re going to be hella entertained by the perfectly timed gags that come at regular intervals and, of course, the fantastic action.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Or I'll just make a kebab outta you

Or I’ll just make a kebab outta you

Ryan Reynolds has played Deadpool before, and we all know how that turned out. It’s normal, thus, for viewers to have pre-movie trust issues (if they do have any; like has anyone witnessed the pitch-perfect marketing of this film?). You can leave your trust issues out of the door, though, because Reynolds nails it. He is just perfect. Playing off his strengths is Morena Baccarin, who is just awesome. Her confidence matches Reynold’s fast-talking wit, and they are terrific together. T. J. Miller isn’t too far behind. He’s hilarious in every scene, and though he doesn’t have a conventional punchline-set, he kills it with his deadpan conversational style. Ed Skrein redeems himself after the insipid The Transporter Refueled, and Gina Carano provides powerful antagonistic support.

Worth it?

Deadpool might have its flaws but is very high on the kind of entertainment value that isn’t necessarily dumbed down. This is that justifiably R-rated, fourth-wall breaking, reference-heavy, self-aware and self-deprecative superhero action-comedy the audience has rightfully deserved since time immemorial—and I mean it; I really do. One of the most entertaining mainstream live-action films to have come out this year, this one comes highly recommended.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Ryan Reynolds
Morena Baccarin
Ed Skrein
Director Tim Miller
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

Deadpool has been fraught with a barrage of expectations—the sheer amount is frightening by a mile and a half. And don’t get this one wrong; the movie’s been doing everything right so far. The studio’s hired the best possible marketing team, giving the potential audience a bare-bones, honest tone of what they’re to expect out of the end-product that would then hit the cinemas.

Sure, but Deadpool in X-Men Origins: Wolverine-

Yeah, no. One’s to forget that wholly, if anything. Reynolds himself desperately wants to, if his various (refreshingly honest) interviews are a hint of anything. The current take on Deadpool’s an entirely fresh start to this possible superhero franchise that, if I’m super-frank, looks just fantastic.

No, really. It does. Dangerously grand.

What’s it About?

The movie’s about Deadpool (aka Wade Wilson, played by Ryan Reynolds) being Deadpool and saving his “main girl” from the “bad guy”.

Hi! it's me, Deadpool.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The opening titles—and might I just say, the best opening titles in what seems to be a while; brilliant compositing you guys—pave the way for the rest of the movie’s pitch perfect tone. The sarcasm and self-awareness aside, the film breaks the fourth wall ever-so-casually every time its titular character can grab the chance to. Now that’s cool, because, despite how regularly the makers have used the technique, its usage betrays little-to-no redundancy. And a lot of its credit goes to the writers, who seem to have just let go while forming the screenplay. Everything feels brash, fresh and a whole lotta fun (in a very organic way). Director of animation films Tim Miller’s first feature-length live-action film shows his focused interest and the undying passion he shares with Reynolds (who’s also a co-producer on this one) for the movie. His execution of the material lends an exceptionally fluid motion to its entirety, keeping the viewers invested for almost every moment of the film.

The film, for its genre, is supported by a relatively meager budget of $58 million. It’s just a notch higher than just a quarter of the budget of producer Simon Kinberg’s last successful superhero stint with X-Men: Days of Future Past (which he also wrote the screenplay for); a whopping $200 million film. It’s important to understand this, primarily because considering how much the makers had at hand (and had to make do with), the amount of focus the end-product boasts of is excellent. Making most of every penny they’ve got, the entire team manages to make a movie that just doesn’t seem to miss a beat for most of itself. Viewers are witness to incredibly composited CGI, fantastic action set-pieces, authentic production design, superior (and I meant that) cinematography, and excellent editing. Julian Clarke understands the rhythm of an action sequence, and, therefore, understands the technique of cutting between shots with just the right amount of pace and visual movement a particular final shot can capture.

But let’s not just get to the bare-bones basics; let’s also give Deadpool’s music supervisor some love. The movie’s runtime boasts of an eclectically curated soundtrack, featuring the likes of Angel of the Morning, used in hilariously ironic sync with the opening titles, all the way to George Michael’s Careless Whisper—my personal favorite when it comes to its usage in the movie. Oh, and Deadpool’s heavily marketed motif Shoop? Yeah, that’s there too, in all its glory. Oh yeah.

Show me some love.

Reading all of this, you must think: this movie looks flawless! What could go wrong, hey? A few little things—yeah, nitpicks, those. But they’re quite legitimate, so hear me out (or read me out, because text, but if you hear a tiny voice in your head recite this text to you, then the expression works). Now, you’ve got a highly R-rated movie, and it’s highly profane, and just the opposite of watered down. Within this film, there’s a lot of envelope-pushing, and some of that aren’t just for the sake of humor. Viewers are presented with two very badass female characters, and one of them’s not a superhero (Morena Baccarin’s Vanessa, Wade’s girlfriend, isn’t exactly your average love-interest-101 woman, you see). Why is it, then, that we’re given  the stereotypical Indian taxi driver we don’t need? A possible argument for that would be that the makers wanted almost everything in the end-product to reek of political incorrectness, which, to an extent, is quite valid. But we don’t need the heavy funnily accented guy when we already have decent comic support, do we now? And if we did, one would like to subject him to the same self-awareness that every other character has. Now if he knew he was playing off of stereotypes, that would ensure a lot more hilarity than is normal.

That’s not where the downers end, though. Considering Deadpool hits the nail on its head with its mostly refreshing narrative structure, why is it that we must excuse its sole self-unaware subplot? While everything about the Wade-Vanessa story is almost pitch perfect, the culmination of the plot-thread itself reeks of the kind of formula we don’t need in the movie. As a good friend of mine perfectly stated in our post-movie conversation, “Why fall back into the trap of the conventions you’re actually making fun of?” Take a few steps backward for a macro-view on it, and you’d agree too. Here’s why I call them nitpicks though: because they actually are just nitpicks. Moreover, a majority of viewers just won’t care a damn about it; they’re going to be hella entertained by the perfectly timed gags that come at regular intervals and, of course, the fantastic action.

Or I'll just make a kebab outta you

To Perform or Not to Perform

Ryan Reynolds has played Deadpool before, and we all know how that turned out. It’s normal, thus, for viewers to have pre-movie trust issues (if they do have any; like has anyone witnessed the pitch-perfect marketing of this film?). You can leave your trust issues out of the door, though, because Reynolds nails it. He is just perfect. Playing off his strengths is Morena Baccarin, who is just awesome. Her confidence matches Reynold’s fast-talking wit, and they are terrific together. T. J. Miller isn’t too far behind. He’s hilarious in every scene, and though he doesn’t have a conventional punchline-set, he kills it with his deadpan conversational style. Ed Skrein redeems himself after the insipid The Transporter Refueled, and Gina Carano provides powerful antagonistic support.

Worth it?

Deadpool might have its flaws, but is very high on the kind of entertainment value that isn’t necessarily dumbed down. This is that justifiably R-rated, fourth-wall breaking, reference-heavy, self-aware and self-deprecative superhero action-comedy the audience has rightfully deserved since time immemorial—and I mean it; I really do. This is one of the most entertaining mainstream live-action films to have come out this year, and comes highly recommended.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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