DESPICABLE ME 3

Despicable Me 3 follows supervillain-turned-superspy Gru as he discovers his long-lost twin brother and ends up having to fight off the latter’s attempts to lure him back to the dark side.

2010 may have been the year of Inception, Black Swan, and The King’s Speech, but it was also the year viewers got to meet supervillain Gru and his “Minions”—those yellow, blob-sized critters we have all come to know. From reprioritizing his life, retiring from villainy and turning superspy—oh and there was also a happily-ever-after thrown in—you would have expected that Gru’s cinematic journey had come to an end.

But this is 2017, and for a franchise that has already grossed a whopping $1.5 billion—and that is excluding the pesky spin-off—a third movie seems like a no-brainer. Except, in what seems like a weird clone between a telenovela and bad Bollywood, Despicable Me 3 adds a long-lost twin brother into its already overfilled bunch of characters.

The film’s central narrative does not seem to be enough for the makers to focus on, unfortunately. Writers Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio—hardcore Illumination loyalists—have as many as four other subplots for your consideration. The problem, of course, is nothing goes the distance. The narrative is swathed in stereotype. Dru (also voiced by Carrell, but who is even weirder as Dru) is the exact opposite of his once-megalomaniac brother. A vacuous pig farmer with a silky mop of blond hair, Dru has forever been the black sheep of the family. It is a small wonder, then, that when Gru finally breaks it to his brother that he loves him, it is not us who cheer for them—just those pesky yellow blobs.

Ken and Cinco can certainly Dru better than this.

[…] if you are looking for moments so fluffy you could die, don’t hold your breath.KELVIN KANTHARAJ VINCENT

Ironically, it is still the Minions that derive all the laughter, regardless of what anybody thinks of them. Fortunately, they are not as overstuffed in this film as in the film’s predecessor, and the primary focus on humor is its antagonist. South Park cocreator Trey Parker voices disgruntled former child star Balthazar Bratt, a man stuck firmly in the ’80s—purple shoulder pads, garish haircut, a retro heist playlist, and what have you—whose weapon of choice is a self-inflating bubble gum.

Even Bratt, however, has little to add to the narrative with his one-note arc. Sure, there’s a fun dance-off between him and Gru, but his setup—stealing an enormous diamond, of all things—receives a payoff as predictable as water is wet. To think that the makers could have smartly exploited the demons of a former child prodigy is, quite simply, heartbreaking. Moreover, if you are looking for moments so fluffy you could die, don’t hold your breath—Gru’s three daughters are relegated to the backseat, and, with them, so is any emotional heft.


Despicable Me 3 might not be as despicable as its franchise’s spin-off, but that is not saying much. With a finale as blatant as the one here, however, one might as well prepare for a despicable fourth—both literally and metaphorically.

Watch the trailer here:

About the Author

Kelvin Kantharaj Vincent

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Voracious reader. Passionate writer. Certified crazy. Relentless foodie.

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Despicable Me 3 follows supervillain-turned-superspy Gru as he discovers his long-lost twin brother and ends up having to fight off the latter’s attempts to lure him back to the dark side.


2010 may have been the year of Inception, Black Swan, and The King’s Speech, but it was also the year viewers got to meet supervillain Gru and his “Minions”—those yellow, blob-sized critters we have all come to know. From reprioritizing his life, retiring from villainy and turning superspy—oh and there was also a happily-ever-after thrown in—you would have expected that Gru’s cinematic journey had come to an end.

But this is 2017, and for a franchise that has already grossed a whopping $1.5 billion—and that is excluding the pesky spin-off—a third movie seems like a no-brainer. Except, in what seems like a weird clone between a telenovela and bad Bollywood, Despicable Me 3 adds a long-lost twin brother into its already overfilled bunch of characters.

The film’s central narrative does not seem to be enough for the makers to focus on, unfortunately. Writers Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio—hardcore Illumination loyalists—have as many as four other subplots for your consideration. The problem, of course, is nothing goes the distance. The narrative is swathed in stereotype. Dru (also voiced by Carrell, but who is even weirder as Dru) is the exact opposite of his once-megalomaniac brother. A vacuous pig farmer with a silky mop of blond hair, Dru has forever been the black sheep of the family. It is a small wonder, then, that when Gru finally breaks it to his brother that he loves him, it is not us who cheer for them—just those pesky yellow blobs.

Ken and Cinco can certainly Dru better than this.

[…] if you are looking for moments so fluffy you could die, don’t hold your breath.KELVIN KANTHARAJ VINCENT

Ironically, it is still the Minions that derive all the laughter, regardless of what anybody thinks of them. Fortunately, they are not as overstuffed in this film as in the film’s predecessor, and the primary focus on humor is its antagonist. South Park cocreator Trey Parker voices disgruntled former child star Balthazar Bratt, a man stuck firmly in the ’80s—purple shoulder pads, garish haircut, a retro heist playlist, and what have you—whose weapon of choice is a self-inflating bubble gum.

Even Bratt, however, has little to add to the narrative with his one-note arc. Sure, there’s a fun dance-off between him and Gru, but his setup—stealing an enormous diamond, of all things—receives a payoff as predictable as water is wet. To think that the makers could have smartly exploited the demons of a former child prodigy is, quite simply, heartbreaking. Moreover, if you are looking for moments so fluffy you could die, don’t hold your breath—Gru’s three daughters are relegated to the backseat, and, with them, so is any emotional heft.


Despicable Me 3 might not be as despicable as its franchise’s spin-off, but that is not saying much. With a finale as blatant as the one here, however, one might as well prepare for a despicable fourth—both literally and metaphorically.

Watch trailer here:

About the Author

Kelvin Kantharaj Vincent

Facebook

Voracious reader. Passionate writer. Certified crazy. Relentless foodie.

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