Drishyam

Not a bad way to kill a lazy weekend afternoon!


Drishyam

Starring: Ajay Devgn, Tabu, Shriya Saran
Directed by: Nishikant Kamat

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

Drishyam

Starring: Ajay Devgn, Tabu, Shriya Saran
Directed by: Nishikant Kamat

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?


Rated

NR

AKA (In English)

The Sight

Starring

Ajay Devgn
Shriya Sran
Tabu
Ishita Dutta
Rajat Kapoor

Written by

Jeethu Joseph (original)
Upendra Sidhaye

Directed by

Nishikant Kamat


coming up

What to Expect

By now, the trailers, numerous interviews and all the buzz on the social media have adequately informed us that Drishyam is a Hindi language remake of the 2013 Malayalam film of the same name that was a massive hit and is also credited for bringing the thespian Mohanlal back in the news and popular culture with renewed vigour. The enthusiasts would also know that while the “original” screenplay is credited to writer-director Jeethu Joseph, there is no denying that it borrows heavily from the 2008 Japanese film Suspect X, WHICH is an adaptation of Keigo Higashino’s novel The Devotion of Suspect X. So, basically we have a remake of a movie inspired by another movie adaptation of a novel, wherein the protagonist gets his ideas from watching movies day in and day out.

How’s that for the love of movies?

Also, thanks to the pre-release buzz and the aforementioned reasons, the audience can be segmented into two; those who have seen/know the plot of the original film including the suspense and those who would be watching this film for the first time in its entirety. The first group would be constantly comparing it to the original(s?) and also the actors to the veterans like Mohanlal and (more recently) Kamal Hassan, while with the second group, chances are they’d be willing partakers of all the proceedings on the screen. For the benefit of the film and to be fair, we would proceed as part of the second group. We cool with that?

What’s it About?

In the quiet village of Pandolim in Goa, lives Vijay Salgaonkar (Ajay Devgn; Singham, lit: Lion) with his wife Nandini (Shriya Saran; Awarapan, lit: Vagrancy) and two daughters and runs a Cable TV broadcast company, cheekily titled Mirage. He is a 4th standard dropout (we are repeatedly told) and lives a modest life until an unexpected event makes his family cross paths with the Police and – to worsen it – with the ruthless IG of Police Meera Deshmukh (Tabu; Haider) having a personal interest in it. What ensues is a cat and mouse game of wits and survival, with each party trying to stay ahead of the other.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Ajay Devgn - Drishyam

“Look! Docile Me! Yay! Or AM I?”

The best and the most arresting part is that the script, despite not being novel, is full of thrills and a fairly engaging storyline with a delicious twist in the end. Drishyam is essentially not a whodunit, as we know all about the crime, the motive and the method all the way. It is, however, more of an elaborate scheme where the trick is to come out clean. The movie does that in a mostly engaging fashion and keeps the viewers invested at the very least in that bit.

The problem with Drishyam begins with weak characterization, right from the film’s beginning. Ajay Devgn’s character prefers spending nights at his office watching movies rather than spending it with his family. He also likes to keep the phone off-the-hook at night so that they don’t disturb him, surprisingly oblivious to their safety or need. When his family forces him to take them out shopping and while trying shoes when his wife trips, he doesn’t even so much as offer her a hand. The fact that director Nishikant Kamath’s film comes around to the plot quickly is great, but in the process it misses out on establishing him as a family man. Also, in the movie’s rush when Devgn gets to hear about the ‘trouble’ at home he immediately gets down to task like he’s been doing it daily. The weak dialogues don’t offer much help either. Much of the police investigation is routine and believable but the film relies on the convenience of Tabu’s epiphany to uncover Devgn’s elaborate ploy, and that is plain disappointing.

While the proceedings in itself are engaging, the jarring music and the absolutely unnecessary (and horrible) songs are a huge let down. While proceeding with a coherent screenplay, Drishyam expects the viewers to keep their focus only on those proceedings and not go beyond or behind them. It is a thriller but the thrill never makes you reach the edge of your seat.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tabu - Drishyam

“Police Officer Swag.”

Any film that casts Tabu immediately elevates itself to interestingness, simply because of her presence. Drishyam does well by giving Tabu extra screen time and she excels in her role both as ruthless police officer and helpless mother. Ajay Devgn appears in a restrained and no frills role after a while and it seems he has forgotten how not to be “criminally good” (in a not so good way. Remember Action Jackson?). All Devgn does is appear meek where needed and speak softly. Even the choice of his wardrobe, that consists of only solid colored shirts is chosen to highlight that aspect of his personality. To imagine him as a scheming and sly guy seems far fetched, but maybe that was the idea. Rajat Kapoor as Tabu’s husband is fluent – and thereby quite effective – in his role. Ishita Dutta as Devgn’s elder daughter Anju is quite a bundle of talent and shows off some promise. The sore thumb in the casting is Shriya Saran who has a dumb character written for her and has been inappropriately planned and presented. The star of the show is Marathi actor Kamlesh Sawant as menacing Inspector Gaitonde, who is always itching to have a go at Devgn’s character and actually does when he gets his opportunity.

Worth it?

Director Nishikant Kamath does well to build a film around a competent script that has plenty of thrills but lacks in pushing the thrill to the level of urgency or building up the suspense to the brim. Drishyam has a consistent narrative with a conveniently unfolding suspense; not a great cinematic feat in the thriller genre but not a bad way to kill a lazy weekend afternoon either. Give it a try!

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!


Rated

NR

AKA (In English)

The Sight

Starring

Ajay Devgn
Shriya Sran
Tabu
Ishita Dutta
Rajat Kapoor

Written by

Jeethu Joseph (original)
Upendra Sidhaye

Directed by

Nishikant Kamat


What to Expect

By now, the trailers, numerous interviews and all the buzz on the social media have adequately informed us that Drishyam is a Hindi language remake of the 2013 Malayalam film of the same name that was a massive hit and is also credited for bringing the thespian Mohanlal back in the news and popular culture with renewed vigour. The enthusiasts would also know that while the “original” screenplay is credited to writer-director Jeethu Joseph, there is no denying that it borrows heavily from the 2008 Japanese film Suspect X, WHICH is an adaptation of Keigo Higashino’s novel The Devotion of Suspect X. So, basically we have a remake of a movie inspired by another movie adaptation of a novel, wherein the protagonist gets his ideas from watching movies day in and day out.

How’s that for the love of movies?

Also, thanks to the pre-release buzz and the aforementioned reasons, the audience can be segmented into two; those who have seen/know the plot of the original film including the suspense and those who would be watching this film for the first time in its entirety. The first group would be constantly comparing it to the original(s?) and also the actors to the veterans like Mohanlal and (more recently) Kamal Hassan, while with the second group, chances are they’d be willing partakers of all the proceedings on the screen. For the benefit of the film and to be fair, we would proceed as part of the second group. We cool with that?

What’s it About?

In the quiet village of Pandolim in Goa, lives Vijay Salgaonkar (Ajay Devgn; Singham, lit: Lion) with his wife Nandini (Shriya Saran; Awarapan, lit: Vagrancy) and two daughters and runs a Cable TV broadcast company, cheekily titled Mirage. He is a 4th standard dropout (we are repeatedly told) and lives a modest life until an unexpected event makes his family cross paths with the Police and – to worsen it – with the ruthless IG of Police Meera Deshmukh (Tabu; Haider) having a personal interest in it. What ensues is a cat and mouse game of wits and survival, with each party trying to stay ahead of the other.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Ajay Devgn - Drishyam

“Look! Docile Me! Yay! Or AM I?”

The best and the most arresting part is that the script, despite not being novel, is full of thrills and a fairly engaging storyline with a delicious twist in the end. Drishyam is essentially not a whodunit, as we know all about the crime, the motive and the method all the way. It is, however, more of an elaborate scheme where the trick is to come out clean. The movie does that in a mostly engaging fashion and keeps the viewers invested at the very least in that bit.

The problem with Drishyam begins with weak characterization, right from the film’s beginning. Ajay Devgn’s character prefers spending nights at his office watching movies rather than spending it with his family. He also likes to keep the phone off-the-hook at night so that they don’t disturb him, surprisingly oblivious to their safety or need. When his family forces him to take them out shopping and while trying shoes when his wife trips, he doesn’t even so much as offer her a hand. The fact that director Nishikant Kamath’s film comes around to the plot quickly is great, but in the process it misses out on establishing him as a family man. Also, in the movie’s rush when Devgn gets to hear about the ‘trouble’ at home he immediately gets down to task like he’s been doing it daily. The weak dialogues don’t offer much help either. Much of the police investigation is routine and believable but the film relies on the convenience of Tabu’s epiphany to uncover Devgn’s elaborate ploy, and that is plain disappointing.

While the proceedings in itself are engaging, the jarring music and the absolutely unnecessary (and horrible) songs are a huge let down. While proceeding with a coherent screenplay, Drishyam expects the viewers to keep their focus only on those proceedings and not go beyond or behind them. It is a thriller but the thrill never makes you reach the edge of your seat.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tabu - Drishyam

“Police Officer Swag.”

Any film that casts Tabu immediately elevates itself to interestingness, simply because of her presence. Drishyam does well by giving Tabu extra screen time and she excels in her role both as ruthless police officer and helpless mother. Ajay Devgn appears in a restrained and no frills role after a while and it seems he has forgotten how not to be “criminally good” (in a not so good way. Remember Action Jackson?). All Devgn does is appear meek where needed and speak softly. Even the choice of his wardrobe, that consists of only solid colored shirts is chosen to highlight that aspect of his personality. To imagine him as a scheming and sly guy seems far fetched, but maybe that was the idea. Rajat Kapoor as Tabu’s husband is fluent – and thereby quite effective – in his role. Ishita Dutta as Devgn’s elder daughter Anju is quite a bundle of talent and shows off some promise. The sore thumb in the casting is Shriya Saran who has a dumb character written for her and has been inappropriately planned and presented. The star of the show is Marathi actor Kamlesh Sawant as menacing Inspector Gaitonde, who is always itching to have a go at Devgn’s character and actually does when he gets his opportunity.

Worth it?

Director Nishikant Kamath does well to build a film around a competent script that has plenty of thrills but lacks in pushing the thrill to the level of urgency or building up the suspense to the brim. Drishyam has a consistent narrative with a conveniently unfolding suspense; not a great cinematic feat in the thriller genre but not a bad way to kill a lazy weekend afternoon either. Give it a try!

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!

What to Expect

Oooooooo mystery! Oh wait.

Oooooooo mystery! Oh wait.

By now, the trailers, numerous interviews and all the buzz on the social media have adequately informed us that Drishyam is a Hindi language remake of the 2013 Malayalam film of the same name that was a massive hit and is also credited for bringing the thespian Mohanlal back in the news and popular culture with renewed vigour. The enthusiasts would also know that while the “original” screenplay is credited to writer-director Jeethu Joseph, there is no denying that it borrows heavily from the 2008 Japanese film Suspect X, WHICH is an adaptation of Keigo Higashino’s novel The Devotion of Suspect X. So, basically we have a remake of a movie inspired by another movie adaptation of a novel, wherein the protagonist gets his ideas from watching movies day in and day out.

How’s that for the love of movies?

Also, thanks to the pre-release buzz and the aforementioned reasons, the audience can be segmented into two; those who have seen/know the plot of the original film including the suspense and those who would be watching this film for the first time in its entirety. The first group would be constantly comparing it to the original(s?) and also the actors to the veterans like Mohanlal and (more recently) Kamal Hassan, while with the second group, chances are they’d be willing partakers of all the proceedings on the screen. For the benefit of the film and to be fair, we would proceed as part of the second group. We cool with that?

What’s it About?

In the quiet village of Pandolim in Goa, lives Vijay Salgaonkar (Ajay Devgn; Singham, lit: Lion) with his wife Nandini (Shriya Saran; Awarapan, lit: Vagrancy) and two daughters and runs a Cable TV broadcast company, cheekily titled Mirage. He is a 4th standard dropout (we are repeatedly told) and lives a modest life until an unexpected event makes his family cross paths with the Police and – to worsen it – with the ruthless IG of Police Meera Deshmukh (Tabu; Haider) having a personal interest in it. What ensues is a cat and mouse game of wits and survival, with each party trying to stay ahead of the other.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Ajay Devgn - Drishyam

“Look! Docile Me! Yay! Or AM I?”

The best and the most arresting part is that the script, despite not being novel, is full of thrills and a fairly engaging storyline with a delicious twist in the end. Drishyam is essentially not a whodunit, as we know all about the crime, the motive and the method all the way. It is, however, more of an elaborate scheme where the trick is to come out clean. The movie does that in a mostly engaging fashion and keeps the viewers invested at the very least in that bit.

The problem with Drishyam begins with weak characterization, right from the film’s beginning. Ajay Devgn’s character prefers spending nights at his office watching movies rather than spending it with his family. He also likes to keep the phone off-the-hook at night so that they don’t disturb him, surprisingly oblivious to their safety or need. When his family forces him to take them out shopping and while trying shoes when his wife trips, he doesn’t even so much as offer her a hand. The fact that director Nishikant Kamath’s film comes around to the plot quickly is great, but in the process it misses out on establishing him as a family man. Also, in the movie’s rush when Devgn gets to hear about the ‘trouble’ at home he immediately gets down to task like he’s been doing it daily. The weak dialogues don’t offer much help either. Much of the police investigation is routine and believable but the film relies on the convenience of Tabu’s epiphany to uncover Devgn’s elaborate ploy, and that is plain disappointing.

While the proceedings in itself are engaging, the jarring music and the absolutely unnecessary (and horrible) songs are a huge let down. While proceeding with a coherent screenplay, Drishyam expects the viewers to keep their focus only on those proceedings and not go beyond or behind them. It is a thriller but the thrill never makes you reach the edge of your seat.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tabu - Drishyam

“Police Officer Swag.”

Any film that casts Tabu immediately elevates itself to interestingness, simply because of her presence. Drishyam does well by giving Tabu extra screen time and she excels in her role both as ruthless police officer and helpless mother. Ajay Devgn appears in a restrained and no frills role after a while and it seems he has forgotten how not to be “criminally good” (in a not so good way. Remember Action Jackson?). All Devgn does is appear meek where needed and speak softly. Even the choice of his wardrobe, that consists of only solid colored shirts is chosen to highlight that aspect of his personality. To imagine him as a scheming and sly guy seems far fetched, but maybe that was the idea. Rajat Kapoor as Tabu’s husband is fluent – and thereby quite effective – in his role. Ishita Dutta as Devgn’s elder daughter Anju is quite a bundle of talent and shows off some promise. The sore thumb in the casting is Shriya Saran who has a dumb character written for her and has been inappropriately planned and presented. The star of the show is Marathi actor Kamlesh Sawant as menacing Inspector Gaitonde, who is always itching to have a go at Devgn’s character and actually does when he gets his opportunity.

Worth it?

Director Nishikant Kamath does well to build a film around a competent script that has plenty of thrills but lacks in pushing the thrill to the level of urgency or building up the suspense to the brim. Drishyam has a consistent narrative with a conveniently unfolding suspense; not a great cinematic feat in the thriller genre but not a bad way to kill a lazy weekend afternoon either. Give it a try!

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us

What to Expect

Oooooooo mystery! Oh wait.

Oooooooo mystery! Oh wait.

By now, the trailers, numerous interviews and all the buzz on the social media have adequately informed us that Drishyam is a Hindi language remake of the 2013 Malayalam film of the same name that was a massive hit and is also credited for bringing the thespian Mohanlal back in the news and popular culture with renewed vigour. The enthusiasts would also know that while the “original” screenplay is credited to writer-director Jeethu Joseph, there is no denying that it borrows heavily from the 2008 Japanese film Suspect X, WHICH is an adaptation of Keigo Higashino’s novel The Devotion of Suspect X. So, basically we have a remake of a movie inspired by another movie adaptation of a novel, wherein the protagonist gets his ideas from watching movies day in and day out.

How’s that for the love of movies?

Also, thanks to the pre-release buzz and the aforementioned reasons, the audience can be segmented into two; those who have seen/know the plot of the original film including the suspense and those who would be watching this film for the first time in its entirety. The first group would be constantly comparing it to the original(s?) and also the actors to the veterans like Mohanlal and (more recently) Kamal Hassan, while with the second group, chances are they’d be willing partakers of all the proceedings on the screen. For the benefit of the film and to be fair, we would proceed as part of the second group. We cool with that?

What’s it About?

In the quiet village of Pandolim in Goa, lives Vijay Salgaonkar (Ajay Devgn; Singham, lit: Lion) with his wife Nandini (Shriya Saran; Awarapan, lit: Vagrancy) and two daughters and runs a Cable TV broadcast company, cheekily titled Mirage. He is a 4th standard dropout (we are repeatedly told) and lives a modest life until an unexpected event makes his family cross paths with the Police and – to worsen it – with the ruthless IG of Police Meera Deshmukh (Tabu; Haider) having a personal interest in it. What ensues is a cat and mouse game of wits and survival, with each party trying to stay ahead of the other.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Ajay Devgn - Drishyam

“Look! Docile Me! Yay! Or AM I?”

The best and the most arresting part is that the script, despite not being novel, is full of thrills and a fairly engaging storyline with a delicious twist in the end. Drishyam is essentially not a whodunit, as we know all about the crime, the motive and the method all the way. It is, however, more of an elaborate scheme where the trick is to come out clean. The movie does that in a mostly engaging fashion and keeps the viewers invested at the very least in that bit.

The problem with Drishyam begins with weak characterization, right from the film’s beginning. Ajay Devgn’s character prefers spending nights at his office watching movies rather than spending it with his family. He also likes to keep the phone off-the-hook at night so that they don’t disturb him, surprisingly oblivious to their safety or need. When his family forces him to take them out shopping and while trying shoes when his wife trips, he doesn’t even so much as offer her a hand. The fact that director Nishikant Kamath’s film comes around to the plot quickly is great, but in the process it misses out on establishing him as a family man. Also, in the movie’s rush when Devgn gets to hear about the ‘trouble’ at home he immediately gets down to task like he’s been doing it daily. The weak dialogues don’t offer much help either. Much of the police investigation is routine and believable but the film relies on the convenience of Tabu’s epiphany to uncover Devgn’s elaborate ploy, and that is plain disappointing.

While the proceedings in itself are engaging, the jarring music and the absolutely unnecessary (and horrible) songs are a huge let down. While proceeding with a coherent screenplay, Drishyam expects the viewers to keep their focus only on those proceedings and not go beyond or behind them. It is a thriller but the thrill never makes you reach the edge of your seat.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Tabu - Drishyam

“Police Officer Swag.”

Any film that casts Tabu immediately elevates itself to interestingness, simply because of her presence. Drishyam does well by giving Tabu extra screen time and she excels in her role both as ruthless police officer and helpless mother. Ajay Devgn appears in a restrained and no frills role after a while and it seems he has forgotten how not to be “criminally good” (in a not so good way. Remember Action Jackson?). All Devgn does is appear meek where needed and speak softly. Even the choice of his wardrobe, that consists of only solid colored shirts is chosen to highlight that aspect of his personality. To imagine him as a scheming and sly guy seems far fetched, but maybe that was the idea. Rajat Kapoor as Tabu’s husband is fluent – and thereby quite effective – in his role. Ishita Dutta as Devgn’s elder daughter Anju is quite a bundle of talent and shows off some promise. The sore thumb in the casting is Shriya Saran who has a dumb character written for her and has been inappropriately planned and presented. The star of the show is Marathi actor Kamlesh Sawant as menacing Inspector Gaitonde, who is always itching to have a go at Devgn’s character and actually does when he gets his opportunity.

Worth it?

Director Nishikant Kamath does well to build a film around a competent script that has plenty of thrills but lacks in pushing the thrill to the level of urgency or building up the suspense to the brim. Drishyam has a consistent narrative with a conveniently unfolding suspense; not a great cinematic feat in the thriller genre but not a bad way to kill a lazy weekend afternoon either. Give it a try!

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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