ALL EYEZ ON ME

All Eyez on Me attempts to explore the tumultuous life of Tupac, his life choices and his thoughts.

With All Eyez on Me, the makers seem forever torn between being the next La Bamba and Straight Outta Compton. What Benny Boom’s film misses out on completely, however, is having its identity. In its place are two elements far less impressive: derivativeness and gratuitous exposition.

Faithful to the “How to Biopic For Dummies” handbook, it nauseously over-glamorizes Tupac Shakur every chance it gets. The decision, unfortunately, comes at the cost of whiling away the opportunity to exploit his role in the sociopolitical structure in the ‘90s.

However, that does not matter. Deification, after all, seems to be the makers’ overbearing agenda. Every frame is shot keeping in mind the aim to turn him into a symbol of coolth. Unfortunately, somewhere between the booze, broads, and jazzily-lit studio setups, there is very little to even give a damn. The protagonist, here, is an irreverent shell of its source.

If there’s anything we can take from Demetrius Shipp Jr., it is that the film is as insincere and unnecessary as his presence and portrayal of Tupac.ANKIT OJHA

All Eyez on Me is not devoid of positives though. Danai Gurira (television’s The Walking Dead) is an absolute revelation. She gives life to a character whose arc has no payoff—that is no mean feat. Kat Graham (television’s The Vampire Diaries) is yet another strong presence. She might be playing a callously written filler-role. Her absolute conviction, however, manages to overpower its length and quality.

The film’s biggest surprise, however, is Jarrett Ellis. Imbibing both the characteristics and diction of Snoop Dogg, Ellis steals the show. Shamefully, the story is not about him—or anything remotely interesting. If there’s anything we can take from Demetrius Shipp Jr., it is that the film is as insincere and unnecessary as his presence and portrayal of Tupac. Moreover, by the time you are through the last over-expository dialogue in the film, you realize how exhausting the experience has been.


Skipping out on any insight worthy of Tupac’s legacy, All Eyez on Me instead succumbs to being a shell of a film that’s neither a biography nor an ode to the evolving music scene the ‘90s boasted. Your eyez deserve better than this.

Watch the trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Star Rating:

Cast

Director

Rated

R

We’re viral

Like usFollow us

All Eyez on Me attempts to explore the tumultuous life of Tupac, his life choices and his thoughts.


With All Eyez on Me, the makers seem forever torn between being the next La Bamba and Straight Outta Compton. What Benny Boom’s film misses out on completely, however, is having its identity. In its place are two elements far less impressive: derivativeness and gratuitous exposition.

Faithful to the “How to Biopic For Dummies” handbook, it nauseously over-glamorizes Tupac Shakur every chance it gets. The decision, unfortunately, comes at the cost of whiling away the opportunity to exploit his role in the sociopolitical structure in the ‘90s.

However, that does not matter. Deification, after all, seems to be the makers’ overbearing agenda. Every frame is shot keeping in mind the aim to turn him into a symbol of coolth. Unfortunately, somewhere between the booze, broads, and jazzily-lit studio setups, there is very little to even give a damn. The protagonist, here, is an irreverent shell of its source.

If there’s anything we can take from Demetrius Shipp Jr., it is that the film is as insincere and unnecessary as his presence and portrayal of Tupac.ANKIT OJHA

All Eyez on Me is not devoid of positives though. Danai Gurira (television’s The Walking Dead) is an absolute revelation. She gives life to a character whose arc has no payoff—that is no mean feat. Kat Graham (television’s The Vampire Diaries) is yet another strong presence. She might be playing a callously written filler-role. Her absolute conviction, however, manages to overpower its length and quality.

The film’s biggest surprise, however, is Jarrett Ellis. Imbibing both the characteristics and diction of Snoop Dogg, Ellis steals the show. Shamefully, the story is not about him—or anything remotely interesting. If there’s anything we can take from Demetrius Shipp Jr., it is that the film is as insincere and unnecessary as his presence and portrayal of Tupac. Moreover, by the time you are through the last over-expository dialogue in the film, you realize how exhausting the experience has been.


Skipping out on any insight worthy of Tupac’s legacy, All Eyez on Me instead succumbs to being a shell of a film that’s neither a biography nor an ode to the evolving music scene the ‘90s boasted. Your eyez deserve better than this.

Watch trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Share this Post