Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

A warm embrace of a film!


Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

  • A warm embrace of a film!

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

  • A warm embrace of a film!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Eddie Redmayne
Katherine Waterston
Ezra Miller
Colin Farrell
Dan Fogler

Written by

J. K. Rowling

Directed by

David Yates



THE PLOT

Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne; The Theory of Everything) is a suspicious young man who’s entered the United States of America with a firm objective. And while he attempts to keep as much of a low profile as possible—and fails—Tina (Katherine Waterston; Queen of Earth) is the only one who can notice that he’s not like the others.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Peter Jackson may not have been able to fully emulate his passion for The Lord of The Rings with its franchise extension through The Hobbit. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, however, has its biggest trump card.

It features J. K. Rowling’s debut as a screenwriter.

Her very involvement gives potential viewers of the film a sense of hope. And while the film in itself doesn’t necessarily have to fulfill the varied expectations of those waiting in line to watch it, Rowling’s trademarks should be enough to give this film a go.

And that may not be a bad idea.

THE MOVIE

Uh ok. Where am I?

Uh ok. Where am I?

Director David Yates has now become a go-to director of sorts for the Potter Cinematic Universe (is it too early to abbreviate it the PCU?), and his work in Fantastic Beasts, thankfully, continues to hold that candle of dependability. Now, while one would have loved to witness Alfonso Cuaron’s riveting visual storytelling trademarks in a film like this, Yates isn’t far off in getting the tone and rhythm of the film right. Having been a part of the universe for four films in a row might be a binding factor, but his effortlessness in the execution of the film’s storytelling shows. What makes it even better, however, is Rowling’s involvement. Her screenwriting consists of every single one of her trademarks that made the Harry Potter book series a worldwide phenomenon—symbolic and empathetic characterization, sharp wit and humor, the art of world-building, and a sheer, almost welcoming sense of warmth that aims to envelope you in itself.

(To enjoy this film, however, one must understand this: the movie aims to consistently work as a fantasy drama. It sure does veer toward exciting, action-packed territories, but those episodes are sparing and never overstay their welcome.)

A compelling film needs a compelling protagonist, and a compelling protagonist a compelling actor. Eddie Redmayne gives an absolutely assured performance as Newt, but one could suspect it is because he’s given the vision of people who attempt to understand the protagonist as much as can be possible. Scamander looks often like a bumbling fool who tends to slip up a tad more than one could tolerate, but balances it out with his power to give love and happiness to every creature he can. We’re dealing with an archetype here—albeit one of the most compelling ones on screen, simply for how emotionally multidimensional he is.

Disintegration

Disintegration

And that can be said for most characters. Ezra Miller is in terrific form as Credence, a constantly troubled boy on the verge of a massive emotional meltdown. His is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that symbolizes the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance. Not one to miss out on opportunities, Miller sets out to own the role with complete conviction, and succeeds. He is tremendous as he represents the very understated nuances of Credence’s behavioral tics. Not surprisingly, Katherine Waterston is effortless, and makes for an emotionally relevant performance of the principled underdog. Her character—ex-auror Porpentina—might not have as many demons as Credence, but cares enough about the people around her to go dangerously out of her way and protect them. One’d remember a certain Minerva McGonagall, but that reminiscence is only fleeting.

[Credence’s] is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that suppresses the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance.Ankit Ojha

Fantastic Beasts, for all the things it does right, isn’t without its weaknesses. Be it with its pace or visually, one’d expect a certain consistency, progression or rhythm in most films. And while the movie doesn’t always mess up, it does tend to lose its balance. Moreover, viewers aren’t immediately sucked into its fantastical (pun unintended) world, for its narrative takes as long as 20 minutes to involve its audience. It’s beginning is almost abrupt, throwing in some admittedly gorgeous spectacle that doesn’t necessarily serve to progress its storytelling—it looks like a pretty set-piece, and nothing more.

Thankfully, what mostly makes up for all of this is Rowling’s creation of an original script that doesn’t necessarily resort to pander to its fans. Sure, there are the occasional easter eggs thrown in, but those aren’t overbearing enough to turn up as blatant fan-service. Fantastic Beasts is a movie that, despite being an extension of a universe filled with witchcraft and wizardry, stands almost entirely on its own. It’s a film that aims to welcome both Potter fans and moviegoers who want a fulfilling cinematic experience at the movies, and mostly succeeds.

No Escape

No Escape

(As an afterthought, viewers might find the movie to perfectly symbolize the times we live in today. The world has turned into a place where conversations aren’t built, but shattered; where the things and people we don’t understand aren’t welcomed, but feared. Rowling, like with every Harry Potter book before this, perfectly encapsulates how humanity is repeatedly ostracized today, be it through something as widespread and internalized as racial discrimination, or the ghosting of those suffering from serious mental health issues. This movie aims for more than a big release; it aims for conversation, just like the author’s previous works).

VERDICT

Fans of Rowling’s seven-part Harry Potter book series might vividly remember picking up its first installment—Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone—and drowning in the acute wonderment and fascination of its universe. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, for all of the author’s brilliant trademarks, mostly works just like that book. And while it doesn’t reach the levels of greatness it aims for, it works very well as a standalone film that aims not to please fans alone, but, quite simply, to be a fulfilling moviegoing experience.

And that it is. It might not be quite fantastic, but is definitely a beast of a film that you must find in cinemas while it’s out.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Eddie Redmayne
Katherine Waterston
Ezra Miller
Colin Farrell
Dan Fogler

Written by

J. K. Rowling

Directed by

David Yates



THE PLOT

Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne; The Theory of Everything) is a suspicious young man who’s entered the United States of America with a firm objective. And while he attempts to keep as much of a low profile as possible—and fails—Tina (Katherine Waterston; Queen of Earth) is the only one who can notice that he’s not like the others.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Peter Jackson may not have been able to fully emulate his passion for The Lord of The Rings with its franchise extension through The Hobbit. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, however, has its biggest trump card.

It features J. K. Rowling’s debut as a screenwriter.

Her very involvement gives potential viewers of the film a sense of hope. And while the film in itself doesn’t necessarily have to fulfill the varied expectations of those waiting in line to watch it, Rowling’s trademarks should be enough to give this film a go.

And that may not be a bad idea.

THE MOVIE

Uh ok. Where am I?

Uh ok. Where am I?

Director David Yates has now become a go-to director of sorts for the Potter Cinematic Universe (is it too early to abbreviate it the PCU?), and his work in Fantastic Beasts, thankfully, continues to hold that candle of dependability. Now, while one would have loved to witness Alfonso Cuaron’s riveting visual storytelling trademarks in a film like this, Yates isn’t far off in getting the tone and rhythm of the film right. Having been a part of the universe for four films in a row might be a binding factor, but his effortlessness in the execution of the film’s storytelling shows. What makes it even better, however, is Rowling’s involvement. Her screenwriting consists of every single one of her trademarks that made the Harry Potter book series a worldwide phenomenon—symbolic and empathetic characterization, sharp wit and humor, the art of world-building, and a sheer, almost welcoming sense of warmth that aims to envelope you in itself.

(To enjoy this film, however, one must understand this: the movie aims to consistently work as a fantasy drama. It sure does veer toward exciting, action-packed territories, but those episodes are sparing and never overstay their welcome.)

A compelling film needs a compelling protagonist, and a compelling protagonist a compelling actor. Eddie Redmayne gives an absolutely assured performance as Newt, but one could suspect it is because he’s given the vision of people who attempt to understand the protagonist as much as can be possible. Scamander looks often like a bumbling fool who tends to slip up a tad more than one could tolerate, but balances it out with his power to give love and happiness to every creature he can. We’re dealing with an archetype here—albeit one of the most compelling ones on screen, simply for how emotionally multidimensional he is.

Disintegration

Disintegration

And that can be said for most characters. Ezra Miller is in terrific form as Credence, a constantly troubled boy on the verge of a massive emotional meltdown. His is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that symbolizes the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance. Not one to miss out on opportunities, Miller sets out to own the role with complete conviction, and succeeds. He is tremendous as he represents the very understated nuances of Credence’s behavioral tics. Not surprisingly, Katherine Waterston is effortless, and makes for an emotionally relevant performance of the principled underdog. Her character—ex-auror Porpentina—might not have as many demons as Credence, but cares enough about the people around her to go dangerously out of her way and protect them. One’d remember a certain Minerva McGonagall, but that reminiscence is only fleeting.

[Credence’s] is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that suppresses the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance.Ankit Ojha

Fantastic Beasts, for all the things it does right, isn’t without its weaknesses. Be it with its pace or visually, one’d expect a certain consistency, progression or rhythm in most films. And while the movie doesn’t always mess up, it does tend to lose its balance. Moreover, viewers aren’t immediately sucked into its fantastical (pun unintended) world, for its narrative takes as long as 20 minutes to involve its audience. It’s beginning is almost abrupt, throwing in some admittedly gorgeous spectacle that doesn’t necessarily serve to progress its storytelling—it looks like a pretty set-piece, and nothing more.

Thankfully, what mostly makes up for all of this is Rowling’s creation of an original script that doesn’t necessarily resort to pander to its fans. Sure, there are the occasional easter eggs thrown in, but those aren’t overbearing enough to turn up as blatant fan-service. Fantastic Beasts is a movie that, despite being an extension of a universe filled with witchcraft and wizardry, stands almost entirely on its own. It’s a film that aims to welcome both Potter fans and moviegoers who want a fulfilling cinematic experience at the movies, and mostly succeeds.

No Escape

No Escape

(As an afterthought, viewers might find the movie to perfectly symbolize the times we live in today. The world has turned into a place where conversations aren’t built, but shattered; where the things and people we don’t understand aren’t welcomed, but feared. Rowling, like with every Harry Potter book before this, perfectly encapsulates how humanity is repeatedly ostracized today, be it through something as widespread and internalized as racial discrimination, or the ghosting of those suffering from serious mental health issues. This movie aims for more than a big release; it aims for conversation, just like the author’s previous works).

VERDICT

Fans of Rowling’s seven-part Harry Potter book series might vividly remember picking up its first installment—Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone—and drowning in the acute wonderment and fascination of its universe. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, for all of the author’s brilliant trademarks, mostly works just like that book. And while it doesn’t reach the levels of greatness it aims for, it works very well as a standalone film that aims not to please fans alone, but, quite simply, to be a fulfilling moviegoing experience.

And that it is. It might not be quite fantastic, but is definitely a beast of a film that you must find in cinemas while it’s out.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Eddie Redmayne
Katherine Waterston
Ezra Miller
Director David Yates
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

THE PLOT

Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne; The Theory of Everything) is a suspicious young man who’s entered the United States of America with a firm objective. And while he attempts to keep as much of a low profile as possible—and fails—Tina (Katherine Waterston; Queen of Earth) is the only one who can notice that he’s not like the others.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Peter Jackson may not have been able to fully emulate his passion for The Lord of The Rings with its franchise extension through The Hobbit. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, however, has its biggest trump card.

It features J. K. Rowling’s debut as a screenwriter.

Her very involvement gives potential viewers of the film a sense of hope. And while the film in itself doesn’t necessarily have to fulfill the varied expectations of those waiting in line to watch it, Rowling’s trademarks should be enough to give this film a go.

And that may not be a bad idea.

THE MOVIE

Uh ok. Where am I?

Uh ok. Where am I?

Director David Yates has now become a go-to director of sorts for the Potter Cinematic Universe (is it too early to abbreviate it the PCU?), and his work in Fantastic Beasts, thankfully, continues to hold that candle of dependability. Now, while one would have loved to witness Alfonso Cuaron’s riveting visual storytelling trademarks in a film like this, Yates isn’t far off in getting the tone and rhythm of the film right. Having been a part of the universe for four films in a row might be a binding factor, but his effortlessness in the execution of the film’s storytelling shows. What makes it even better, however, is Rowling’s involvement. Her screenwriting consists of every single one of her trademarks that made the Harry Potter book series a worldwide phenomenon—symbolic and empathetic characterization, sharp wit and humor, the art of world-building, and a sheer, almost welcoming sense of warmth that aims to envelope you in itself.

(To enjoy this film, however, one must understand this: the movie aims to consistently work as a fantasy drama. It sure does veer toward exciting, action-packed territories, but those episodes are sparing and never overstay their welcome.)

A compelling film needs a compelling protagonist, and a compelling protagonist a compelling actor. Eddie Redmayne gives an absolutely assured performance as Newt, but one could suspect it is because he’s given the vision of people who attempt to understand the protagonist as much as can be possible. Scamander looks often like a bumbling fool who tends to slip up a tad more than one could tolerate, but balances it out with his power to give love and happiness to every creature he can. We’re dealing with an archetype here—albeit one of the most compelling ones on screen, simply for how emotionally multidimensional he is.

Disintegration

Disintegration

And that can be said for most characters. Ezra Miller is in terrific form as Credence, a constantly troubled boy on the verge of a massive emotional meltdown. His is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that symbolizes the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance. Not one to miss out on opportunities, Miller sets out to own the role with complete conviction, and succeeds. He is tremendous as he represents the very understated nuances of Credence’s behavioral tics. Not surprisingly, Katherine Waterston is effortless, and makes for an emotionally relevant performance of the principled underdog. Her character—ex-auror Porpentina—might not have as many demons as Credence, but cares enough about the people around her to go dangerously out of her way and protect them. One’d remember a certain Minerva McGonagall, but that reminiscence is only fleeting.

[Credence’s] is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that suppresses the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance.Ankit Ojha

Fantastic Beasts, for all the things it does right, isn’t without its weaknesses. Be it with its pace or visually, one’d expect a certain consistency, progression or rhythm in most films. And while the movie doesn’t always mess up, it does tend to lose its balance. Moreover, viewers aren’t immediately sucked into its fantastical (pun unintended) world, for its narrative takes as long as 20 minutes to involve its audience. It’s beginning is almost abrupt, throwing in some admittedly gorgeous spectacle that doesn’t necessarily serve to progress its storytelling—it looks like a pretty set-piece, and nothing more.

Thankfully, what mostly makes up for all of this is Rowling’s creation of an original script that doesn’t necessarily resort to pander to its fans. Sure, there are the occasional easter eggs thrown in, but those aren’t overbearing enough to turn up as blatant fan-service. Fantastic Beasts is a movie that, despite being an extension of a universe filled with witchcraft and wizardry, stands almost entirely on its own. It’s a film that aims to welcome both Potter fans and moviegoers who want a fulfilling cinematic experience at the movies, and mostly succeeds.

No Escape

No Escape

(As an afterthought, viewers might find the movie to perfectly symbolize the times we live in today. The world has turned into a place where conversations aren’t built, but shattered; where the things and people we don’t understand aren’t welcomed, but feared. Rowling, like with every Harry Potter book before this, perfectly encapsulates how humanity is repeatedly ostracized today, be it through something as widespread and internalized as racial discrimination, or the ghosting of those suffering from serious mental health issues. This movie aims for more than a big release; it aims for conversation, just like the author’s previous works).

VERDICT

Fans of Rowling’s seven-part Harry Potter book series might vividly remember picking up its first installment—Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone—and drowning in the acute wonderment and fascination of its universe. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, for all of the author’s brilliant trademarks, mostly works just like that book. And while it doesn’t reach the levels of greatness it aims for, it works very well as a standalone film that aims not to please fans alone, but, quite simply, to be a fulfilling moviegoing experience.

And that it is. It might not be quite fantastic, but is definitely a beast of a film that you must find in cinemas while it’s out.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Eddie Redmayne
Katherine Waterston
Ezra Miller
Director David Yates
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

THE PLOT

Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne; The Theory of Everything) is a suspicious young man who’s entered the United States of America with a firm objective. And while he attempts to keep as much of a low profile as possible—and fails—Tina (Katherine Waterston; Queen of Earth) is the only one who can notice that he’s not like the others.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Peter Jackson may not have been able to fully emulate his passion for The Lord of The Rings with its franchise extension through The Hobbit. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, however, has its biggest trump card.

It features J. K. Rowling’s debut as a screenwriter.

Her very involvement gives potential viewers of the film a sense of hope. And while the film in itself doesn’t necessarily have to fulfill the varied expectations of those waiting in line to watch it, Rowling’s trademarks should be enough to give this film a go.

And that may not be a bad idea.

THE MOVIE

Uh ok. Where am I?

Director David Yates has now become a go-to director of sorts for the Potter Cinematic Universe (is it too early to abbreviate it the PCU?), and his work in Fantastic Beasts, thankfully, continues to hold that candle of dependability. Now, while one would have loved to witness Alfonso Cuaron’s riveting visual storytelling trademarks in a film like this, Yates isn’t far off in getting the tone and rhythm of the film right. Having been a part of the universe for four films in a row might be a binding factor, but his effortlessness in the execution of the film’s storytelling shows. What makes it even better, however, is Rowling’s involvement. Her screenwriting consists of every single one of her trademarks that made the Harry Potter book series a worldwide phenomenon—symbolic and empathetic characterization, sharp wit and humor, the art of world-building, and a sheer, almost welcoming sense of warmth that aims to envelope you in itself.

(To enjoy this film, however, one must understand this: the movie aims to consistently work as a fantasy drama. It sure does veer toward exciting, action-packed territories, but those episodes are sparing and never overstay their welcome.)

A compelling film needs a compelling protagonist, and a compelling protagonist a compelling actor. Eddie Redmayne gives an absolutely assured performance as Newt, but one could suspect it is because he’s given the vision of people who attempt to understand the protagonist as much as can be possible. Scamander looks often like a bumbling fool who tends to slip up a tad more than one could tolerate, but balances it out with his power to give love and happiness to every creature he can. We’re dealing with an archetype here—albeit one of the most compelling ones on screen, simply for how emotionally multidimensional he is.

[Credence’s] is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that suppresses the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance.Ankit Ojha
Disintegration

And that can be said for most characters. Ezra Miller is in terrific form as Credence, a constantly troubled boy on the verge of a massive emotional meltdown. His is a fascinating, almost painful, character arc that symbolizes the many adverse effects of emotional suppression for societal acceptance. Not one to miss out on opportunities, Miller sets out to own the role with complete conviction, and succeeds. He is tremendous as he represents the very understated nuances of Credence’s behavioral tics. Not surprisingly, Katherine Waterston is effortless, and makes for an emotionally relevant performance of the principled underdog. Her character—ex-auror Porpentina—might not have as many demons as Credence, but cares enough about the people around her to go dangerously out of her way and protect them. One’d remember a certain Minerva McGonagall, but that reminiscence is only fleeting.

Fantastic Beasts, for all the things it does right, isn’t without its weaknesses. Be it with its pace or visually, one’d expect a certain consistency, progression or rhythm in most films. And while the movie doesn’t always mess up, it does tend to lose its balance. Moreover, viewers aren’t immediately sucked into its fantastical (pun unintended) world, for its narrative takes as long as 20 minutes to involve its audience. It’s beginning is almost abrupt, throwing in some admittedly gorgeous spectacle that doesn’t necessarily serve to progress its storytelling—it looks like a pretty set-piece, and nothing more.

Thankfully, what mostly makes up for all of this is Rowling’s creation of an original script that doesn’t necessarily resort to pander to its fans. Sure, there are the occasional easter eggs thrown in, but those aren’t overbearing enough to turn up as blatant fan-service. Fantastic Beasts is a movie that, despite being an extension of a universe filled with witchcraft and wizardry, stands almost entirely on its own. It’s a film that aims to welcome both Potter fans and moviegoers who want a fulfilling cinematic experience at the movies, and mostly succeeds.

(As an afterthought, viewers might find the movie to perfectly symbolize the times we live in today. The world has turned into a place where conversations aren’t built, but shattered; where the things and people we don’t understand aren’t welcomed, but feared. Rowling, like with every Harry Potter book before this, perfectly encapsulates how humanity is repeatedly ostracized today, be it through something as widespread and internalized as racial discrimination, or the ghosting of those suffering from serious mental health issues. This movie aims for more than a big release; it aims for conversation, just like the author’s previous works).

Friendship versus responsibility

VERDICT

Fans of Rowling’s seven-part Harry Potter book series might vividly remember picking up its first installment—Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone—and drowning in the acute wonderment and fascination of its universe. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, for all of the author’s brilliant trademarks, mostly works just like that book. And while it doesn’t reach the levels of greatness it aims for, it works very well as a standalone film that aims not to please fans alone, but, quite simply, to be a fulfilling moviegoing experience.

And that it is. It might not be quite fantastic, but is definitely a beast of a film that you must find in cinemas while it’s out.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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