THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Zombie apocalypse films seldom generate the thrill viewers sought from films of the kind previously. The Resident Evil franchise, in particular, is known for bringing both its source—the videogame franchise of the same name—and its own genre to a shameful standstill. Within the mainstream film atmosphere, however, a few fun attempts to reinvent this small piece of the big-fat-horror-puzzle.

Could one say, thus, that The Girl with All the Gifts is the godsend-of-the-undead viewers have been waiting for? Perhaps.

THE MOVIE

Ah, wonderment

From the first second on, Colm McCarthy is relentless in his vision of his adapted visual creation. The Girl with All the Gifts, sourced from Mike R. Carey’s two-odd year old novel, starts off solid, building atmosphere, plot devices and character simultaneously, not missing a single beat. Viewers are introduced to its hyper-contained universe, which feels as horrifyingly real as the makers want the viewers to feel—perhaps more.

Underneath its zombie survival thread, however, the storytelling aims to symbolically achieve a lot more. Consider this a relatively visceral retelling of Zootopia’s message, with a (perhaps) sharper overall perspective. While Disney’s bold animation film explores the uncomfortable question of power, and the kind of role it plays in racism, McCarthy’s film almost answers it, giving it a solid—if a tad too utopian in real life—solution. Through Carey’s source, the director doesn’t just acknowledge the problem. He attempts to give it a direction to conclude.

Consider this a relatively visceral retelling of Zootopia’s message, with a (perhaps) sharper overall perspective.ANKIT OJHA

Which is what makes the casting this precisely great. Its lead, played with smashing conviction by Sennia Nanua, is a person of interest, if we may, to many of the people around her. Some, who are but projecting from their own deathly experiences, want her ‘gone’, while some others feel they can use her as collateral damage for a bigger cause. But there’s only a rare person who will generate the right amount of empathy between many commentators and humans who have grown up with internalized discrimination they find hard to unlearn.

That Nanua’s a person of color, while every other key player in the movie apart from her—Gemma Arterton, Glenn Close, or Paddy Considine, all stellar performers—is not, is why the execution of searing subtext within the storytelling of The Girl with All the Gifts becomes that much more admirable. All its technical marvel—Cristo’s breathless soundtrack, Simon Dennis’s cinematographic urgency, and the deliciously deliberate edit decisions of Matthew Cannings—only adds up to what a fantastic end-product this leads to.

There’s a scene or two mid-movie that may feel redundant to viewers, what with an absolutely breathless first half hour. In the long run of things though, it doesn’t matter, for you’re watching a film that’s as terrifying as it is telling and timely. And with the ballsy route it takes in its third act, it just seals it on simply how relevant this movie might feel to many. Sure, it ends on a severe, discomforting note. That, however, may have been exactly what the makers would want its viewers to feel.

Bugger off, mofos!

VERDICT

Amongst the many plot devices within the expressionist movement in cinema, zombies and vampires have been the most misrepresented in modern pop culture. The Girl with All the Gifts fortunately aims to do its bit to subvert the market friendly narrative of (at least one of) these fictional beings. Sure, it’s made to thrill its viewers—the film moves at a mostly frenetic, breathless pace—but it also offers a solidly built universe and empathetic character evolution, with a terrific underlying commentary that doesn’t just toe around its theme’s edges. McCarthy’s film doesn’t flirt with the idea of discrimination. It takes control of it, and bravely sees it across, respecting both its source, and the creator who lent it to be visually represented the way we see it today.

Watch the trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Star Rating:

Plot

Melanie is a girl with all the gifts. And around her are three different kinds of people—one who is scared of these “gifts”, one who wants to use them all, and one who just wants to connect with her as a human being.

Cast

Gemma Arterton
Glenn Close
Sennia Nanua

Director

Colm McCarthy

Rated

N/A

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Gemma Arterton
Glenn Close
Sennia Nanua
Director Colm McCarthy
Star Rating

THE PLOT

Melanie is a girl with all the gifts. And around her are three different kinds of people—one who is scared of these “gifts”, one who wants to use them all, and one who just wants to connect with her as a human being.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Zombie apocalypse films seldom generate the thrill viewers sought from films of the kind previously. The Resident Evil franchise, in particular, is known for bringing both its source—the videogame franchise of the same name—and its own genre to a shameful standstill. Within the mainstream film atmosphere, however, a few fun attempts to reinvent this small piece of the big-fat-horror-puzzle.

Could one say, thus, that The Girl with All the Gifts is the godsend-of-the-undead viewers have been waiting for? Perhaps.

THE MOVIE

Ah, wonderment

From the first second on, Colm McCarthy is relentless in his vision of his adapted visual creation. The Girl with All the Gifts, sourced from Mike R. Carey’s two-odd year old novel, starts off solid, building atmosphere, plot devices and character simultaneously, not missing a single beat. Viewers are introduced to its hyper-contained universe, which feels as horrifyingly real as the makers want the viewers to feel—perhaps more.

Underneath its zombie survival thread, however, the storytelling aims to symbolically achieve a lot more. Consider this a relatively visceral retelling of Zootopia’s message, with a (perhaps) sharper overall perspective. While Disney’s bold animation film explores the uncomfortable question of power, and the kind of role it plays in racism, McCarthy’s film almost answers it, giving it a solid—if a tad too utopian in real life—solution. Through Carey’s source, the director doesn’t just acknowledge the problem. He attempts to give it a direction to conclude.

Consider this a relatively visceral retelling of Zootopia’s message, with a (perhaps) sharper overall perspective.ANKIT OJHA

Which is what makes the casting this precisely great. Its lead, played with smashing conviction by Sennia Nanua, is a person of interest, if we may, to many of the people around her. Some, who are but projecting from their own deathly experiences, want her ‘gone’, while some others feel they can use her as collateral damage for a bigger cause. But there’s only a rare person who will generate the right amount of empathy between many commentators and humans who have grown up with internalized discrimination they find hard to unlearn.

That Nanua’s a person of color, while every other key player in the movie apart from her—Gemma Arterton, Glenn Close, or Paddy Considine, all stellar performers—is not, is why the execution of searing subtext within the storytelling of The Girl with All the Gifts becomes that much more admirable. All its technical marvel—Cristo’s breathless soundtrack, Simon Dennis’s cinematographic urgency, and the deliciously deliberate edit decisions of Matthew Cannings—only adds up to what a fantastic end-product this leads to.

There’s a scene or two mid-movie that may feel redundant to viewers, what with an absolutely breathless first half hour. In the long run of things though, it doesn’t matter, for you’re watching a film that’s as terrifying as it is telling and timely. And with the ballsy route it takes in its third act, it just seals it on simply how relevant this movie might feel to many. Sure, it ends on a severe, discomforting note. That, however, may have been exactly what the makers would want its viewers to feel.

Am I the perpetrator or protector?

VERDICT

Amongst the many plot devices within the expressionist movement in cinema, zombies and vampires have been the most misrepresented in modern pop culture. The Girl with All the Gifts fortunately aims to do its bit to subvert the market friendly narrative of (at least one of) these fictional beings. Sure, it’s made to thrill its viewers—the film moves at a mostly frenetic, breathless pace—but it also offers a solidly built universe and empathetic character evolution, with a terrific underlying commentary that doesn’t just toe around its theme’s edges. McCarthy’s film doesn’t flirt with the idea of discrimination. It takes control of it, and bravely sees it across, respecting both its source, and the creator who lent it to be visually represented the way we see it today.

Watch trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Share this Post