Gods of Egypt

Where inconsistency overpowers fearlessness


Gods of Egypt

  • Where inconsistency overpowers fearlessness

Gods of Egypt

  • Where inconsistency overpowers fearlessness


AKA

Kings of Egypt

Rated

PG-13

Starring

Gerard Butler
Geoffrey Rush
Rufus Sewell
Brenton Thwaites
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau

Written by

Matt Sazama
Burk Sharpless

Directed by

Alex Proyas



What to Expect

There’s nothing to expect from Gods of Egypt. In all honesty, the whole universe feels like just another play on the sword-and-sandal cinematic reruns we’ve been having; except this time round, we’re in Egypt. And while there’s Brenton Thwaites (The Giver), the movie’s only claim-to-fame seems to be Gerard Butler (who’s next to be seen in London Has Fallen), which isn’t much. Sure, there’s Alex Proyas, whose mad visual environments made I, Robot a tolerable adaptation of a far better source—the Isaac Asimov science fiction novel that inspired it. His last great movie being The Crow, and his last directorial effort being the worst of them all (Knowing, starring Nicholas Cage), the audience now doesn’t exactly know what to make of this product. The tables could still turn, though, right? ‘Course they could, if the script were an uncannily sharp one.

But they don’t.

What’s it About?

Two gods fight for their rightful place as the ruler of Egypt; a thief needs to save his love and pushes himself through dangerous hoops to “save the world” too.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A Triangle of Lurve. Oh, and a Sauron-esque eye.

A Triangle of Lurve. Oh, and a Sauron-esque eye.

As one gets into the cinemas, one needs to understand what exactly they’re getting into, if only to get the most out of the purchase of that ticket. One way to do so would be to understand the filmography of its writing duo Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless. And if potential viewers were still neat enough with The Last Witch Hunter and Dracula Untold, then Gods of Egypt should be a cakewalk.

Only, as a film, it’s not.

One does get the vibe of what the movie’s going for—the makers don’t care about accuracy, authenticity, or restraint. The earth’s flat, there’s a spaceship holding a ball of sun through a chain (a freakin’ chain, amirite?), the gods bleed gold, and, of course, the gods of wisdom have (sort of) LED-lit blue brains—there’s also the (again, sort of) LED-lit blue eyes, but I guess we’ve all seen that in the trailer, so there’s no need for me to further explain that, is there?

And honestly, the world building is great. There’s a lot of fun to be had with something as anti-reason as this; the writers have almost literally exploited the pre-historic worldview of the Earth and the rules of mortality. Almost. Because the rest of the screenplay doesn’t exactly support how radical the entire movie could have been. That’s the problem; the film had an immense amount of potential. One could just imagine the crazy directions the writers could have taken with their setup, but at the end of the day, it falls back on the two most overdone plot devices in the history of action filmmaking—vengeance and saving the distressed damsel you’re in love with.

Egypt has Fallen

Egypt has Fallen

And nope.

Which then rests on viewers looking for the visual mastery of Alex Proyas (even Knowing looked gorgeous, with every wide-angle frame a painting). Unfortunately, the inconsistency trickles in here too. The director doesn’t seem to know the kind of visual style he’s looking for, and this ends up with him going out on a limb and pitching in a jumble of different ones. So you have a couple of scenes that fall into the space-opera bracket, some that are gleefully cartoonish, some inherently video-game-y ones and some regular period sword-and-sandal types. Neither justifies itself to be presented in any style and ends up looking, simply, like a bunch of shots that scream “cool” without knowing what makes them cool and why they were there in the first place.

Movies like this allow us to revisit jilted young adult space-operas like Jupiter Ascending, or the apparently jumbled Sucker Punch and why they make a lot more sense in context now. If not in plot, the directors of the films as mentioned earlier, at the very least, have a strong defense on why they picked a particular cinematic style to support its narrations. Proyas doesn’t. Which is why, though I would have appreciated speaking on its technical aspects, I find nothing to talk about, simply because of its extreme inconsistency.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The (Eye) Giver

The (Eye) Giver

Brenton Thwaites is earnest, and the chemistry he has with Courtney Eaton (Mad Max: Fury Road) is pitch perfect. Eaton herself is confident and comes across as a natural. Elodie Yung (the Netflix Original Daredevil) is so much fun to watch while she’s around. Nikolaj Coster-Waldau seems to be enjoying his time doing the movie, which should be a cakewalk, considering especially his stint in television’s Game of Thrones. That was yet another period piece in which he holds a very distinct swagger—he carries it forward here too. Gerard Butler and Geoffrey Rush are, quite frankly, fantastic. They allow for more depth to their characters, which (especially for Butler) is surprising.

Worth it?

Those not expecting anything from the film would find it tolerable enough, with enough action set-pieces to stay invested in within the movie’s runtime. It’s clear, however, that neither Proyas nor the writers have any intention to go any further than just a quarter crazy. With inconsistent CGI (as a result of inconsistent visual styling) and a rather jaded narrative palette, there’s nothing much to look up to, to be reasonably honest.

However, there definitely is an audience for this kind of film; a major bunch of viewers I got out with discussing the movie dug into it. What it doesn’t deny, however, is the half-baked effort of its makers, and the quality of the resultant end-product. Gods of Egypt might not be a specifically torturous film, and its watchability definitely depends upon different types of audiences, but for those who’re giving it a miss, they’re not missing much at all.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


AKA

Kings of Egypt

Rated

PG-13

Starring

Gerard Butler
Geoffrey Rush
Rufus Sewell
Brenton Thwaites
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau

Written by

Matt Sazama
Burk Sharpless

Directed by

Alex Proyas



What to Expect

There’s nothing to expect from Gods of Egypt. In all honesty, the whole universe feels like just another play on the sword-and-sandal cinematic reruns we’ve been having; except this time round, we’re in Egypt. And while there’s Brenton Thwaites (The Giver), the movie’s only claim-to-fame seems to be Gerard Butler (who’s next to be seen in London Has Fallen), which isn’t much. Sure, there’s Alex Proyas, whose mad visual environments made I, Robot a tolerable adaptation of a far better source—the Isaac Asimov science fiction novel that inspired it. His last great movie being The Crow, and his last directorial effort being the worst of them all (Knowing, starring Nicholas Cage), the audience now doesn’t exactly know what to make of this product. The tables could still turn, though, right? ‘Course they could, if the script were an uncannily sharp one.

But they don’t.

What’s it About?

Two gods fight for their rightful place as the ruler of Egypt; a thief needs to save his love and pushes himself through dangerous hoops to “save the world” too.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A Triangle of Lurve. Oh, and a Sauron-esque eye.

A Triangle of Lurve. Oh, and a Sauron-esque eye.

As one gets into the cinemas, one needs to understand what exactly they’re getting into, if only to get the most out of the purchase of that ticket. One way to do so would be to understand the filmography of its writing duo Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless. And if potential viewers were still neat enough with The Last Witch Hunter and Dracula Untold, then Gods of Egypt should be a cakewalk.

Only, as a film, it’s not.

One does get the vibe of what the movie’s going for—the makers don’t care about accuracy, authenticity, or restraint. The earth’s flat, there’s a spaceship holding a ball of sun through a chain (a freakin’ chain, amirite?), the gods bleed gold, and, of course, the gods of wisdom have (sort of) LED-lit blue brains—there’s also the (again, sort of) LED-lit blue eyes, but I guess we’ve all seen that in the trailer, so there’s no need for me to further explain that, is there?

And honestly, the world building is great. There’s a lot of fun to be had with something as anti-reason as this; the writers have almost literally exploited the pre-historic worldview of the Earth and the rules of mortality. Almost. Because the rest of the screenplay doesn’t exactly support how radical the entire movie could have been. That’s the problem; the film had an immense amount of potential. One could just imagine the crazy directions the writers could have taken with their setup, but at the end of the day, it falls back on the two most overdone plot devices in the history of action filmmaking—vengeance and saving the distressed damsel you’re in love with.

Egypt has Fallen

Egypt has Fallen

And nope.

Which then rests on viewers looking for the visual mastery of Alex Proyas (even Knowing looked gorgeous, with every wide-angle frame a painting). Unfortunately, the inconsistency trickles in here too. The director doesn’t seem to know the kind of visual style he’s looking for, and this ends up with him going out on a limb and pitching in a jumble of different ones. So you have a couple of scenes that fall into the space-opera bracket, some that are gleefully cartoonish, some inherently video-game-y ones and some regular period sword-and-sandal types. Neither justifies itself to be presented in any style and ends up looking, simply, like a bunch of shots that scream “cool” without knowing what makes them cool and why they were there in the first place.

Movies like this allow us to revisit jilted young adult space-operas like Jupiter Ascending, or the apparently jumbled Sucker Punch and why they make a lot more sense in context now. If not in plot, the directors of the films as mentioned earlier, at the very least, have a strong defense on why they picked a particular cinematic style to support its narrations. Proyas doesn’t. Which is why, though I would have appreciated speaking on its technical aspects, I find nothing to talk about, simply because of its extreme inconsistency.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The (Eye) Giver

The (Eye) Giver

Brenton Thwaites is earnest, and the chemistry he has with Courtney Eaton (Mad Max: Fury Road) is pitch perfect. Eaton herself is confident and comes across as a natural. Elodie Yung (the Netflix Original Daredevil) is so much fun to watch while she’s around. Nikolaj Coster-Waldau seems to be enjoying his time doing the movie, which should be a cakewalk, considering especially his stint in television’s Game of Thrones. That was yet another period piece in which he holds a very distinct swagger—he carries it forward here too. Gerard Butler and Geoffrey Rush are, quite frankly, fantastic. They allow for more depth to their characters, which (especially for Butler) is surprising.

Worth it?

Those not expecting anything from the film would find it tolerable enough, with enough action set-pieces to stay invested in within the movie’s runtime. It’s clear, however, that neither Proyas nor the writers have any intention to go any further than just a quarter crazy. With inconsistent CGI (as a result of inconsistent visual styling) and a rather jaded narrative palette, there’s nothing much to look up to, to be reasonably honest.

However, there definitely is an audience for this kind of film; a major bunch of viewers I got out with discussing the movie dug into it. What it doesn’t deny, however, is the half-baked effort of its makers, and the quality of the resultant end-product. Gods of Egypt might not be a specifically torturous film, and its watchability definitely depends upon different types of audiences, but for those who’re giving it a miss, they’re not missing much at all.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Brenton Thwaites
Gerard Butler
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau
Director Alex Proyas
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

Bleedin' Gold

Bleedin’ Gold

There’s nothing to expect from Gods of Egypt. In all honesty, the whole universe feels like just another play on the sword-and-sandal cinematic reruns we’ve been having; except this time round, we’re in Egypt. And while there’s Brenton Thwaites (The Giver), the movie’s only claim-to-fame seems to be Gerard Butler (who’s next to be seen in London Has Fallen), which isn’t much. Sure, there’s Alex Proyas, whose mad visual environments made I, Robot a tolerable adaptation of a far better source—the Isaac Asimov science fiction novel that inspired it. His last great movie being The Crow, and his last directorial effort being the worst of them all (Knowing, starring Nicholas Cage), the audience now doesn’t exactly know what to make of this product. The tables could still turn, though, right? ‘Course they could, if the script were an uncannily sharp one.

But they don’t.

What’s it About?

Two gods fight for their rightful place as the ruler of Egypt; a thief needs to save his love and pushes himself through dangerous hoops to “save the world” too.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A Triangle of Lurve. Oh, and a Sauron-esque eye.

A Triangle of Lurve. Oh, and a Sauron-esque eye.

As one gets into the cinemas, one needs to understand what exactly they’re getting into, if only to get the most out of the purchase of that ticket. One way to do so would be to understand the filmography of its writing duo Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless. And if potential viewers were still neat enough with The Last Witch Hunter and Dracula Untold, then Gods of Egypt should be a cakewalk.

Only, as a film, it’s not.

One does get the vibe of what the movie’s going for—the makers don’t care about accuracy, authenticity, or restraint. The earth’s flat, there’s a spaceship holding a ball of sun through a chain (a freakin’ chain, amirite?), the gods bleed gold, and, of course, the gods of wisdom have (sort of) LED-lit blue brains—there’s also the (again, sort of) LED-lit blue eyes, but I guess we’ve all seen that in the trailer, so there’s no need for me to further explain that, is there?

And honestly, the world building is great. There’s a lot of fun to be had with something as anti-reason as this; the writers have almost literally exploited the pre-historic worldview of the Earth and the rules of mortality. Almost. Because the rest of the screenplay doesn’t exactly support how radical the entire movie could have been. That’s the problem; the film had an immense amount of potential. One could just imagine the crazy directions the writers could have taken with their setup, but at the end of the day, it falls back on the two most overdone plot devices in the history of action filmmaking—vengeance and saving the distressed damsel you’re in love with.

Egypt has Fallen

Egypt has Fallen

And nope.

Which then rests on viewers looking for the visual mastery of Alex Proyas (even Knowing looked gorgeous, with every wide-angle frame a painting). Unfortunately, the inconsistency trickles in here too. The director doesn’t seem to know the kind of visual style he’s looking for, and this ends up with him going out on a limb and pitching in a jumble of different ones. So you have a couple of scenes that fall into the space-opera bracket, some that are gleefully cartoonish, some inherently video-game-y ones and some regular period sword-and-sandal types. Neither justifies itself to be presented in any style and ends up looking, simply, like a bunch of shots that scream “cool” without knowing what makes them cool and why they were there in the first place.

Movies like this allow us to revisit jilted young adult space-operas like Jupiter Ascending, or the apparently jumbled Sucker Punch and why they make a lot more sense in context now. If not in plot, the directors of the films as mentioned earlier, at the very least, have a strong defense on why they picked a particular cinematic style to support its narrations. Proyas doesn’t. Which is why, though I would have appreciated speaking on its technical aspects, I find nothing to talk about, simply because of its extreme inconsistency.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The (Eye) Giver

The (Eye) Giver

Brenton Thwaites is earnest, and the chemistry he has with Courtney Eaton (Mad Max: Fury Road) is pitch perfect. Eaton herself is confident and comes across as a natural. Elodie Yung (the Netflix Original Daredevil) is so much fun to watch while she’s around. Nikolaj Coster-Waldau seems to be enjoying his time doing the movie, which should be a cakewalk, considering especially his stint in television’s Game of Thrones. That was yet another period piece in which he holds a very distinct swagger—he carries it forward here too. Gerard Butler and Geoffrey Rush are, quite frankly, fantastic. They allow for more depth to their characters, which (especially for Butler) is surprising.

Worth it?

Those not expecting anything from the film would find it tolerable enough, with enough action set-pieces to stay invested in within the movie’s runtime. It’s clear, however, that neither Proyas nor the writers have any intention to go any further than just a quarter crazy. With inconsistent CGI (as a result of inconsistent visual styling) and a rather jaded narrative palette, there’s nothing much to look up to, to be reasonably honest.

However, there definitely is an audience for this kind of film; a major bunch of viewers I got out with discussing the movie dug into it. What it doesn’t deny, however, is the half-baked effort of its makers, and the quality of the resultant end-product. Gods of Egypt might not be a specifically torturous film, and its watchability definitely depends upon different types of audiences, but for those who’re giving it a miss, they’re not missing much at all.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Brenton Thwaites
Gerard Butler
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau
Director Alex Proyas
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

There’s nothing to expect from Gods of Egypt. In all honesty, the whole universe feels like just another play on the sword-and-sandal cinematic reruns we’ve been having; except this time round, we’re in Egypt. And while there’s Brenton Thwaites (The Giver), the movie’s only claim-to-fame seems to be Gerard Butler (who’s next to be seen in London Has Fallen), which isn’t much. Sure, there’s Alex Proyas, whose mad visual environments made I, Robot a tolerable adaptation of a far better source—the Isaac Asimov science fiction novel that inspired it. His last great movie being The Crow, and his last directorial effort being the worst of them all (Knowing, starring Nicholas Cage), the audience now doesn’t exactly know what to make of this product. The tables could still turn, though, right? ‘Course they could, if the script were an uncannily sharp one.

But they don’t.

What’s it About?

Two gods fight for their rightful place as the ruler of Egypt; a thief needs to save his love and pushes himself through dangerous hoops to “save the world” too.

A Triangle of Lurve. Oh, and a Sauron-esque eye.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

As one gets into the cinemas, one needs to understand what exactly they’re getting into, if only to get the most out of the purchase of that ticket. One way to do so would be to understand the filmography of its writing duo Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless. And if potential viewers were still neat enough with The Last Witch Hunter and Dracula Untold, then Gods of Egypt should be a cakewalk.

Only, as a film, it’s not.

One does get the vibe of what the movie’s going for—the makers don’t care about accuracy, authenticity, or restraint. The earth’s flat, there’s a spaceship holding a ball of sun through a chain (a freakin’ chain, amirite?), the gods bleed gold, and, of course, the gods of wisdom have (sort of) LED-lit blue brains—there’s also the (again, sort of) LED-lit blue eyes, but I guess we’ve all seen that in the trailer, so there’s no need for me to further explain that, is there?

And honestly, the world building is great. There’s a lot of fun to be had with something as anti-reason as this; the writers have almost literally exploited the pre-historic worldview of the Earth and the rules of mortality. Almost. Because the rest of the screenplay doesn’t exactly support how radical the entire movie could have been. That’s the problem; the film had an immense amount of potential. One could just imagine the crazy directions the writers could have taken with their setup, but at the end of the day, it falls back on the two most overdone plot devices in the history of action filmmaking—vengeance and saving the distressed damsel you’re in love with.

Egypt has Fallen

And nope.

Which then rests on viewers looking for the visual mastery of Alex Proyas (even Knowing looked gorgeous, with every wide-angle frame a painting). Unfortunately, the inconsistency trickles in here too. The director doesn’t seem to know the kind of visual style he’s looking for, and this ends up with him going out on a limb and pitching in a jumble of different ones. So you have a couple of scenes that fall into the space-opera bracket, some that are gleefully cartoonish, some inherently video-game-y ones and some regular period sword-and-sandal types. Neither justifies itself to be presented in any style and ends up looking, simply, like a bunch of shots that scream “cool” without knowing what makes them cool and why they were there in the first place.

Movies like this allow us to revisit jilted young adult space-operas like Jupiter Ascending, or the apparently jumbled Sucker Punch and why they make a lot more sense in context now. If not in plot, the directors of the films as mentioned earlier, at the very least, have a strong defense on why they picked a particular cinematic style to support its narrations. Proyas doesn’t. Which is why, though I would have appreciated speaking on its technical aspects, I find nothing to talk about, simply because of its extreme inconsistency.

The (Eye) Giver

To Perform or Not to Perform

Brenton Thwaites is earnest, and the chemistry he has with Courtney Eaton (Mad Max: Fury Road) is pitch perfect. Eaton herself is confident and comes across as a natural. Elodie Yung (the Netflix Original Daredevil) is so much fun to watch while she’s around. Nikolaj Coster-Waldau seems to be enjoying his time doing the movie, which should be a cakewalk, considering especially his stint in television’s Game of Thrones. That was yet another period piece in which he holds a very distinct swagger—he carries it forward here too. Gerard Butler and Geoffrey Rush are, quite frankly, fantastic. They allow for more depth to their characters, which (especially for Butler) is surprising.

Worth it?

Those not expecting anything from the film would find it tolerable enough, with enough action set-pieces to stay invested in within the movie’s runtime. It’s clear, however, that neither Proyas nor the writers have any intention to go any further than just a quarter crazy. With inconsistent CGI (as a result of inconsistent visual styling) and a rather jaded narrative palette, there’s nothing much to look up to, to be reasonably honest.

However, there definitely is an audience for this kind of film; a major bunch of viewers I got out with discussing the movie dug into it. What it doesn’t deny, however, is the half-baked effort of its makers, and the quality of the resultant end-product. Gods of Egypt might not be a specifically torturous film, and its watchability definitely depends upon different types of audiences, but for those who’re giving it a miss, they’re not missing much at all.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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