Goosebumps

Moderately fun scares!


Goosebumps

  • Moderately fun scares!

Goosebumps

  • Moderately fun scares!


Rated
Starring

Jack Black
Dylan Minnette
Odeya Rush
Amy Ryan
Ryan Lee

Written by

Scott Alexander
Larry Karaszewski
Darren Lemke

Directed by

Rob Letterman



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What to Expect

While one may find the return of the collaboration between actor-comedian Jack Black (The Big Year) and director Rob Letterman to be a less-than-appealing prospect, their last movie together being the disappointing Gulliver’s Travels, there still seems to be a lot of promise to be found within the previews of Goosebumps. And while the skepticism still lingers, the expectations of this horror-comedy can, suffice to say, be intact with the hope it’s brought out within its potential viewers.

What’s it About?

As a family of Gale (Amy Ryan; Win Win) and her son Zach (Dylan Minnette; television’s Awake) running away from their past end up moving to a new place, they’re faced with the added challenge of dealing with their seemingly evil new neighbor known as “Mr. Shivers”, who’s the father of Hannah (Odeya Rush; The Giver), a girl Zach’s taken a liking to.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The Walking Black

The Walking Black

What strikes you the first about Goosebumps is most definitely its breathlessly fast pace, which – as an advantage to the makers – distracts the viewers from pondering over the film’s plot line more often than not. And thanks to the razor-sharp edit, you’re mostly on your toes throughout the film. Additionally, the plot itself might not be the most original, but how adequately it’s handled will keep your interest in the proceedings alive. The characters of Black, Rush and Minnette hold your interest, primarily because of how likable and relatable they are. Much like Gulliver’s Travels, Letterman’s latest effort keeps the self-awareness alive through most of the film’s runtime. Unlike it, however, the movie fortunately creates a lot more leverage for humor than the skeptics would ordinarily expect. On the flipside, one would wish for the humor to be a lot less rockier than its graph of consistency shows. While a generous bunch of sequences do tickle our funny bones, there are so many admittedly understandable jokes that lose out on the timing due to (I reckon) how dizzyingly speedy the film decides to be. ‘Course, that’s not the only rocky element of the film; the classic happy-ending comes to one and all at the cost of a surprisingly discomforting quasi plot hole that you’d expect the makers to be a tad bit attentive on, methinks.

Visually, the film strongly banks on the decent VFX compositing through its runtime. It’s a great looking film with no monster that feels out of place. Despite this, the movie doesn’t necessarily require a 3D viewing per se; the film can be equally functional on a 2D screen, without any loss in experience. The fun music and the rather intimate production design help in giving every viewer a specifically ol’ school vibe that you’d fairly expect from any of R. L. Stine’s creations within the Goosebumps series.

To Perform or Not to Perform

GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

The film banks purely on Jack Black’s impeccable comic timing and overall personality to get this movie through. Amy Ryan is decent, understated support. Odeya Rush exudes a very specific kind of positivity to her character, and Dylan Minnette is the only other person who manages to hold his own alongside Black. Ryan Lee’s alright, but there’s a certain redundancy which tends to come with a role of his kind. And a half an hour into the film, it shows.

Worth it?

Goosebumps might not be the best movie this season, but it sure is quite moderately enjoyable, with a lot of the film’s elements completely working in its favor, including, of course, the pace, the overall humor and Black’s presence, if not anything else. This one’s an undoubtedly giddy one-time ride on 2D, and a fairly functional Halloween film too. Give this one a try; there are high chances you’ll be entertained and come out a happy puppy!

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated
Starring

Jack Black
Dylan Minnette
Odeya Rush
Amy Ryan
Ryan Lee

Written by

Scott Alexander
Larry Karaszewski
Darren Lemke

Directed by

Rob Letterman



What to Expect

While one may find the return of the collaboration between actor-comedian Jack Black (The Big Year) and director Rob Letterman to be a less-than-appealing prospect, their last movie together being the disappointing Gulliver’s Travels, there still seems to be a lot of promise to be found within the previews of Goosebumps. And while the skepticism still lingers, the expectations of this horror-comedy can, suffice to say, be intact with the hope it’s brought out within its potential viewers.

What’s it About?

As a family of Gale (Amy Ryan; Win Win) and her son Zach (Dylan Minnette; television’s Awake) running away from their past end up moving to a new place, they’re faced with the added challenge of dealing with their seemingly evil new neighbor known as “Mr. Shivers”, who’s the father of Hannah (Odeya Rush; The Giver), a girl Zach’s taken a liking to.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The Walking Black

The Walking Black

What strikes you the first about Goosebumps is most definitely its breathlessly fast pace, which – as an advantage to the makers – distracts the viewers from pondering over the film’s plot line more often than not. And thanks to the razor-sharp edit, you’re mostly on your toes throughout the film. Additionally, the plot itself might not be the most original, but how adequately it’s handled will keep your interest in the proceedings alive. The characters of Black, Rush and Minnette hold your interest, primarily because of how likable and relatable they are. Much like Gulliver’s Travels, Letterman’s latest effort keeps the self-awareness alive through most of the film’s runtime. Unlike it, however, the movie fortunately creates a lot more leverage for humor than the skeptics would ordinarily expect. On the flipside, one would wish for the humor to be a lot less rockier than its graph of consistency shows. While a generous bunch of sequences do tickle our funny bones, there are so many admittedly understandable jokes that lose out on the timing due to (I reckon) how dizzyingly speedy the film decides to be. ‘Course, that’s not the only rocky element of the film; the classic happy-ending comes to one and all at the cost of a surprisingly discomforting quasi plot hole that you’d expect the makers to be a tad bit attentive on, methinks.

Visually, the film strongly banks on the decent VFX compositing through its runtime. It’s a great looking film with no monster that feels out of place. Despite this, the movie doesn’t necessarily require a 3D viewing per se; the film can be equally functional on a 2D screen, without any loss in experience. The fun music and the rather intimate production design help in giving every viewer a specifically ol’ school vibe that you’d fairly expect from any of R. L. Stine’s creations within the Goosebumps series.

To Perform or Not to Perform

GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

The film banks purely on Jack Black’s impeccable comic timing and overall personality to get this movie through. Amy Ryan is decent, understated support. Odeya Rush exudes a very specific kind of positivity to her character, and Dylan Minnette is the only other person who manages to hold his own alongside Black. Ryan Lee’s alright, but there’s a certain redundancy which tends to come with a role of his kind. And a half an hour into the film, it shows.

Worth it?

Goosebumps might not be the best movie this season, but it sure is quite moderately enjoyable, with a lot of the film’s elements completely working in its favor, including, of course, the pace, the overall humor and Black’s presence, if not anything else. This one’s an undoubtedly giddy one-time ride on 2D, and a fairly functional Halloween film too. Give this one a try; there are high chances you’ll be entertained and come out a happy puppy!

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Jack Black
Dylan Minnette
Odeya Rush
Director Rob Letterman
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

BOO!

BOO!

While one may find the return of the collaboration between actor-comedian Jack Black (The Big Year) and director Rob Letterman to be a less-than-appealing prospect, their last movie together being the disappointing Gulliver’s Travels, there still seems to be a lot of promise to be found within the previews of Goosebumps. And while the skepticism still lingers, the expectations of this horror-comedy can, suffice to say, be intact with the hope it’s brought out within its potential viewers.

What’s it About?

As a family of Gale (Amy Ryan; Win Win) and her son Zach (Dylan Minnette; television’s Awake) running away from their past end up moving to a new place, they’re faced with the added challenge of dealing with their seemingly evil new neighbor known as “Mr. Shivers”, who’s the father of Hannah (Odeya Rush; The Giver), a girl Zach’s taken a liking to.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The Walking Black

The Walking Black

What strikes you the first about Goosebumps is most definitely its breathlessly fast pace, which – as an advantage to the makers – distracts the viewers from pondering over the film’s plot line more often than not. And thanks to the razor-sharp edit, you’re mostly on your toes throughout the film. Additionally, the plot itself might not be the most original, but how adequately it’s handled will keep your interest in the proceedings alive. The characters of Black, Rush and Minnette hold your interest, primarily because of how likable and relatable they are. Much like Gulliver’s Travels, Letterman’s latest effort keeps the self-awareness alive through most of the film’s runtime. Unlike it, however, the movie fortunately creates a lot more leverage for humor than the skeptics would ordinarily expect. On the flipside, one would wish for the humor to be a lot less rockier than its graph of consistency shows. While a generous bunch of sequences do tickle our funny bones, there are so many admittedly understandable jokes that lose out on the timing due to (I reckon) how dizzyingly speedy the film decides to be. ‘Course, that’s not the only rocky element of the film; the classic happy-ending comes to one and all at the cost of a surprisingly discomforting quasi plot hole that you’d expect the makers to be a tad bit attentive on, methinks.

Visually, the film strongly banks on the decent VFX compositing through its runtime. It’s a great looking film with no monster that feels out of place. Despite this, the movie doesn’t necessarily require a 3D viewing per se; the film can be equally functional on a 2D screen, without any loss in experience. The fun music and the rather intimate production design help in giving every viewer a specifically ol’ school vibe that you’d fairly expect from any of R. L. Stine’s creations within the Goosebumps series.

To Perform or Not to Perform

GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

The film banks purely on Jack Black’s impeccable comic timing and overall personality to get this movie through. Amy Ryan is decent, understated support. Odeya Rush exudes a very specific kind of positivity to her character, and Dylan Minnette is the only other person who manages to hold his own alongside Black. Ryan Lee’s alright, but there’s a certain redundancy which tends to come with a role of his kind. And a half an hour into the film, it shows.

Worth it?

Goosebumps might not be the best movie this season, but it sure is quite moderately enjoyable, with a lot of the film’s elements completely working in its favor, including, of course, the pace, the overall humor and Black’s presence, if not anything else. This one’s an undoubtedly giddy one-time ride on 2D, and a fairly functional Halloween film too. Give this one a try; there are high chances you’ll be entertained and come out a happy puppy!

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Jack Black
Dylan Minnette
Odeya Rush
Director Rob Letterman
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

While one may find the return of the collaboration between actor-comedian Jack Black (The Big Year) and director Rob Letterman to be a less-than-appealing prospect, their last movie together being the disappointing Gulliver’s Travels, there still seems to be a lot of promise to be found within the previews of Goosebumps. And while the skepticism still lingers, the expectations of this horror-comedy can, suffice to say, be intact with the hope it’s brought out within its potential viewers.

What’s it About?

As a family of Gale (Amy Ryan; Win Win) and her son Zach (Dylan Minnette; television’s Awake) running away from their past end up moving to a new place, they’re faced with the added challenge of dealing with their seemingly evil new neighbor known as “Mr. Shivers”, who’s the father of Hannah (Odeya Rush; The Giver), a girl Zach’s taken a liking to.

The Walking Black

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

What strikes you the first about Goosebumps is most definitely its breathlessly fast pace, which – as an advantage to the makers – distracts the viewers from pondering over the film’s plot line more often than not. And thanks to the razor-sharp edit, you’re mostly on your toes throughout the film. Additionally, the plot itself might not be the most original, but how adequately it’s handled will keep your interest in the proceedings alive. The characters of Black, Rush and Minnette hold your interest, primarily because of how likable and relatable they are. Much like Gulliver’s Travels, Letterman’s latest effort keeps the self-awareness alive through most of the film’s runtime. Unlike it, however, the movie fortunately creates a lot more leverage for humor than the skeptics would ordinarily expect. On the flipside, one would wish for the humor to be a lot less rockier than its graph of consistency shows. While a generous bunch of sequences do tickle our funny bones, there are so many admittedly understandable jokes that lose out on the timing due to (I reckon) how dizzyingly speedy the film decides to be. ‘Course, that’s not the only rocky element of the film; the classic happy-ending comes to one and all at the cost of a surprisingly discomforting quasi plot hole that you’d expect the makers to be a tad bit attentive on, methinks.

Visually, the film strongly banks on the decent VFX compositing through its runtime. It’s a great looking film with no monster that feels out of place. Despite this, the movie doesn’t necessarily require a 3D viewing per se; the film can be equally functional on a 2D screen, without any loss in experience. The fun music and the rather intimate production design help in giving every viewer a specifically ol’ school vibe that you’d fairly expect from any of R. L. Stine’s creations within the Goosebumps series.

GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

To Perform or Not to Perform

The film banks purely on Jack Black’s impeccable comic timing and overall personality to get this movie through. Amy Ryan is decent, understated support. Odeya Rush exudes a very specific kind of positivity to her character, and Dylan Minnette is the only other person who manages to hold his own alongside Black. Ryan Lee’s alright, but there’s a certain redundancy which tends to come with a role of his kind. And a half an hour into the film, it shows.

Worth it?

Goosebumps might not be the best movie this season, but it sure is quite moderately enjoyable, with a lot of the film’s elements completely working in its favor, including, of course, the pace, the overall humor and Black’s presence, if not anything else. This one’s an undoubtedly giddy one-time ride on 2D, and a fairly functional Halloween film too. Give this one a try; there are high chances you’ll be entertained and come out a happy puppy!

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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