Il Racconto Dei Racconti

The bold and the (bewilderingly) beautiful


Il Racconto Dei Racconti

  • The bold and the (bewilderingly) beautiful

Il Racconto Dei Racconti

  • The bold and the (bewilderingly) beautiful


AKA (English Title)

Tale of Tales

Rated

N/A

Starring

Salma Hayek
John C. Reilly
Christian Lees
Vincent Cassel
Toby Jones

Written by

Matteo Garrone
Edoardo Albinati
Ugo Chiti
Massimo Gaudioso

Directed by

Matteo Garrone



What to Expect

Il Racconto Dei Racconti probably boasts one of the strongest casts I’ve seen in a film that’s probably sprung onto us out of practically nowhere. You’ve got Vincent Cassel (Trance), Salma Hayek (Frida) and John C. Reilly (The Promotion) to name among others. And this also marks a probable first for its critical darling of an Italian-language movie director Matteo Garrone: it’s his first English-language film.

But for poor ole me, who hasn’t had a chance to check out a singe film from Garrone’s admittedly impressive filmography (and for whatever little credit I have, his Gomorrah has been a part of my wish-list of movies to watch for a while now), this had me going into something I haven’t been able to decipher even through its rather uncanny trailers.

And here I was, my nerve-wracked self attending a screening of the same, wondering what was in store for me. And for one, even though I had no idea, I knew I may have been in for something I may not have expected. Like ever.

What’s it About?

A queen (Salma Hayek) obsesses for life inside of her, at the cost of anything. A king (Vincent Cassel) obsesses for beauty and sexual gratification. And another king (Toby Jones) obsesses on an eventual pet, at the cost of his sanity and his daughter. What their obsessions drive them to do and how each of their stories pan out forms the rest of the movie.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Of loneliness

Well, for one, let me admit this: I’d have loved Into the Woods to be as bold, dark and auteur-driven as this film inherently shows itself to be. Every scene in the film has wonder, vigor and bewilderment as potential emotions an audience member could feel inside of them, primarily because despite acting out in the format of three simultaneous fairytales, what this movie does differently is to push the boundaries of what you’re comfortable watching on the big screen.

Based on Lo cunto de li cunti (the Pentamerone), the seventeenth century fairytale collection by Italian poet-courtier Giambattista Basile which claim to consist of the earliest versions of our favorite fairytales we’ve read of and witnessed while growing up, the film adapts with liberal creative license three very particular fairytales: La Cerva Fatata (The Enchanted Doe), La Pulce (The Flea) and La Vecchia Scorticata (The Flayed Old Lady). Evidently thus a fairytale-trio of sorts, director Matteo Garrone doesn’t shy away from making some characters as exceedingly dark and desperate; a whole lot more than today’s humanity thinks we’d otherwise be. The primary character of each storyline is spurred by a dangerous obsession each. Be it for sexual gratification, for a child of their own, or for a hobby, many of these obsessions play out to form a very dark, almost unpredictable set of events that are bound to disturb as much as they will bewilder. The decisions the characters of this film make may not always be ideal, but are knee-jerk reactions of a mind lusting after their one ultimate goal.

Of desolation

This is what exactly makes the film as deliciously unique as it is harrowingly blood-curdling. Audience members have a major potential of being put off completely by the movie’s ultimate tonal shock-value, but this does not for a single moment mean that the film is any bad. View it with an open mind, and there are high chances that while processing the film in your head – and believe you me, the movie will most definitely take a helluva time to wrap around your shocked, oft disturbed brain-cells – you will definitely come across to respect it for its many merits at the very least, even if your personal opinion of the film may not be as favorable primarily due to what you may have witnessed. This is primarily because there is a bundle of things that make the film applause-worthy. For one, the collaborative screenplay of Garrone, Edoardo Albinati, Ugo Chiti and Massimo Gaudioso give the characters terrific justification, much so that the ones who are inherently good people get our deserved emotional investment, and the ones who are grey get our (sometimes flabbergasted) fascination; they become character studies that end up being the raging thoughts we’re possessed by once the credits roll and we make an attempt to walk out of the cinemas.

If, amongst the fantastic production design, Peter Suschitzky’s (After Earth) stunning cinematography and the conviction-riddled edit decisions heralded by Marco Spoletini, there is anything I’d be extremely disappointed by, it would be the less-than-impressive visual effects compositing. This is a film which is supposed to blend in the real and the surreal; to make every object created by designers and animators a part of the world we’re watching. The flea and the sea-monster among others, tilt more toward obvious animation than anything else. Which is a damn-shame. Alexandre Desplat’s (The Grand Budapest Hotel) music is another very strong point, bringing the film’s emotional vigor alive.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Of age

Salma Hayek is very good in some portions, and then off-kilter in some. Toby Jones (The Hunger Games:) makes the most impact as the king driven to insanity by his obsession of the flea. Bebe Cave (Great Expectations) is excellent, and handles her role with conviction, coming out a winner especially in the film’s final minutes. Handling a dual role with ease, Christian Lees plays his roles competently. John C. Reilly in his short stint is efficient. Vincent Cassel is terrific. Guillaume Delaunay impresses, especially as he has an extremely difficult, performance-oriented role to pull off. His participation in the role of the Ogre eventually is able to bring out the exact emotions of disgust the film might have aimed to incite within the audience. Stacy Martin and Hayley Carmichael do well with their portrayals what’s ultimately the same character in different ages. Shirley Henderson (Anna Karenina) comes across with a shining performance with her portrayal of a very specific, innate human desperation in the second half of the film. The others are functional.

Worth it?

Il Racconto Dei Racconti is an incredibly bewildering, albeit impressively mounted film that is as disturbingly unpredictable as it is a fascinating character study for its audience. This movie has an insane potential of tearing you apart, flabbergasting you more often than not, and ultimately overwhelming you with way too much information to process immediately after you’ve watched the film. As you end up piecing the film together in the days that go by, however, there’s a lot of potential to understand this melange of fantasy and horror at a relatively deeper stage than you may have the moment you walked out of the cinemas. Doubling as both a fairytale for adults and a look into the depths of human obsession, this Garrone-directed film may not be for everybody, as it decisively pushes many a boundary the potential audience may have unconsciously put around themselves when expecting something of a film. Should you, however, get in with an open mind; one without any set expectations of the genre, then you’d definitely find a lot to admire and respect within the movie; its director’s strong conviction amongst the most important of factors.

If you love cinema, or simply wish to attempt something unlike anything you’ve seen in the cinemas before, this comes across as a definite recommendation. If, however, your preconceived expectations have a potential of getting in the way of how the makers wish to unadulteratedly portray their stories, then you might want to stay away from this.

PS: Don’t let your flailing emotions deter you from accurately judging this piece of work.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


AKA (English Title)

Tale of Tales

Rated

N/A

Starring

Salma Hayek
John C. Reilly
Christian Lees
Vincent Cassel
Toby Jones

Written by

Matteo Garrone
Edoardo Albinati
Ugo Chiti
Massimo Gaudioso

Directed by

Matteo Garrone



What to Expect

Il Racconto Dei Racconti probably boasts one of the strongest casts I’ve seen in a film that’s probably sprung onto us out of practically nowhere. You’ve got Vincent Cassel (Trance), Salma Hayek (Frida) and John C. Reilly (The Promotion) to name among others. And this also marks a probable first for its critical darling of an Italian-language movie director Matteo Garrone: it’s his first English-language film.

But for poor ole me, who hasn’t had a chance to check out a singe film from Garrone’s admittedly impressive filmography (and for whatever little credit I have, his Gomorrah has been a part of my wish-list of movies to watch for a while now), this had me going into something I haven’t been able to decipher even through its rather uncanny trailers.

And here I was, my nerve-wracked self attending a screening of the same, wondering what was in store for me. And for one, even though I had no idea, I knew I may have been in for something I may not have expected. Like ever.

What’s it About?

A queen (Salma Hayek) obsesses for life inside of her, at the cost of anything. A king (Vincent Cassel) obsesses for beauty and sexual gratification. And another king (Toby Jones) obsesses on an eventual pet, at the cost of his sanity and his daughter. What their obsessions drive them to do and how each of their stories pan out forms the rest of the movie.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Of loneliness

Well, for one, let me admit this: I’d have loved Into the Woods to be as bold, dark and auteur-driven as this film inherently shows itself to be. Every scene in the film has wonder, vigor and bewilderment as potential emotions an audience member could feel inside of them, primarily because despite acting out in the format of three simultaneous fairytales, what this movie does differently is to push the boundaries of what you’re comfortable watching on the big screen.

Based on Lo cunto de li cunti (the Pentamerone), the seventeenth century fairytale collection by Italian poet-courtier Giambattista Basile which claim to consist of the earliest versions of our favorite fairytales we’ve read of and witnessed while growing up, the film adapts with liberal creative license three very particular fairytales: La Cerva Fatata (The Enchanted Doe), La Pulce (The Flea) and La Vecchia Scorticata (The Flayed Old Lady). Evidently thus a fairytale-trio of sorts, director Matteo Garrone doesn’t shy away from making some characters as exceedingly dark and desperate; a whole lot more than today’s humanity thinks we’d otherwise be. The primary character of each storyline is spurred by a dangerous obsession each. Be it for sexual gratification, for a child of their own, or for a hobby, many of these obsessions play out to form a very dark, almost unpredictable set of events that are bound to disturb as much as they will bewilder. The decisions the characters of this film make may not always be ideal, but are knee-jerk reactions of a mind lusting after their one ultimate goal.

Of desolation

This is what exactly makes the film as deliciously unique as it is harrowingly blood-curdling. Audience members have a major potential of being put off completely by the movie’s ultimate tonal shock-value, but this does not for a single moment mean that the film is any bad. View it with an open mind, and there are high chances that while processing the film in your head – and believe you me, the movie will most definitely take a helluva time to wrap around your shocked, oft disturbed brain-cells – you will definitely come across to respect it for its many merits at the very least, even if your personal opinion of the film may not be as favorable primarily due to what you may have witnessed. This is primarily because there is a bundle of things that make the film applause-worthy. For one, the collaborative screenplay of Garrone, Edoardo Albinati, Ugo Chiti and Massimo Gaudioso give the characters terrific justification, much so that the ones who are inherently good people get our deserved emotional investment, and the ones who are grey get our (sometimes flabbergasted) fascination; they become character studies that end up being the raging thoughts we’re possessed by once the credits roll and we make an attempt to walk out of the cinemas.

If, amongst the fantastic production design, Peter Suschitzky’s (After Earth) stunning cinematography and the conviction-riddled edit decisions heralded by Marco Spoletini, there is anything I’d be extremely disappointed by, it would be the less-than-impressive visual effects compositing. This is a film which is supposed to blend in the real and the surreal; to make every object created by designers and animators a part of the world we’re watching. The flea and the sea-monster among others, tilt more toward obvious animation than anything else. Which is a damn-shame. Alexandre Desplat’s (The Grand Budapest Hotel) music is another very strong point, bringing the film’s emotional vigor alive.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Of age

Salma Hayek is very good in some portions, and then off-kilter in some. Toby Jones (The Hunger Games:) makes the most impact as the king driven to insanity by his obsession of the flea. Bebe Cave (Great Expectations) is excellent, and handles her role with conviction, coming out a winner especially in the film’s final minutes. Handling a dual role with ease, Christian Lees plays his roles competently. John C. Reilly in his short stint is efficient. Vincent Cassel is terrific. Guillaume Delaunay impresses, especially as he has an extremely difficult, performance-oriented role to pull off. His participation in the role of the Ogre eventually is able to bring out the exact emotions of disgust the film might have aimed to incite within the audience. Stacy Martin and Hayley Carmichael do well with their portrayals what’s ultimately the same character in different ages. Shirley Henderson (Anna Karenina) comes across with a shining performance with her portrayal of a very specific, innate human desperation in the second half of the film. The others are functional.

Worth it?

Il Racconto Dei Racconti is an incredibly bewildering, albeit impressively mounted film that is as disturbingly unpredictable as it is a fascinating character study for its audience. This movie has an insane potential of tearing you apart, flabbergasting you more often than not, and ultimately overwhelming you with way too much information to process immediately after you’ve watched the film. As you end up piecing the film together in the days that go by, however, there’s a lot of potential to understand this melange of fantasy and horror at a relatively deeper stage than you may have the moment you walked out of the cinemas. Doubling as both a fairytale for adults and a look into the depths of human obsession, this Garrone-directed film may not be for everybody, as it decisively pushes many a boundary the potential audience may have unconsciously put around themselves when expecting something of a film. Should you, however, get in with an open mind; one without any set expectations of the genre, then you’d definitely find a lot to admire and respect within the movie; its director’s strong conviction amongst the most important of factors.

If you love cinema, or simply wish to attempt something unlike anything you’ve seen in the cinemas before, this comes across as a definite recommendation. If, however, your preconceived expectations have a potential of getting in the way of how the makers wish to unadulteratedly portray their stories, then you might want to stay away from this.

PS: Don’t let your flailing emotions deter you from accurately judging this piece of work.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

AKA (English Title) Tale of Tales
Cast Salma Hayek
Vincent Cassel
Toby Jones
Director Matteo Garrone
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

Of obsession

Of obsession

Il Racconto Dei Racconti probably boasts one of the strongest casts I’ve seen in a film that’s probably sprung onto us out of practically nowhere. You’ve got Vincent Cassel (Trance), Salma Hayek (Frida) and John C. Reilly (The Promotion) to name among others. And this also marks a probable first for its critical darling of an Italian-language movie director Matteo Garrone: it’s his first English-language film.

But for poor ole me, who hasn’t had a chance to check out a singe film from Garrone’s admittedly impressive filmography (and for whatever little credit I have, his Gomorrah has been a part of my wish-list of movies to watch for a while now), this had me going into something I haven’t been able to decipher even through its rather uncanny trailers.

And here I was, my nerve-wracked self attending a screening of the same, wondering what was in store for me. And for one, even though I had no idea, I knew I may have been in for something I may not have expected. Like ever.

What’s it About?

A queen (Salma Hayek) obsesses for life inside of her, at the cost of anything. A king (Vincent Cassel) obsesses for beauty and sexual gratification. And another king (Toby Jones) obsesses on an eventual pet, at the cost of his sanity and his daughter. What their obsessions drive them to do and how each of their stories pan out forms the rest of the movie.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Of loneliness

Well, for one, let me admit this: I’d have loved Into the Woods to be as bold, dark and auteur-driven as this film inherently shows itself to be. Every scene in the film has wonder, vigor and bewilderment as potential emotions an audience member could feel inside of them, primarily because despite acting out in the format of three simultaneous fairytales, what this movie does differently is to push the boundaries of what you’re comfortable watching on the big screen.

Based on Lo cunto de li cunti (the Pentamerone), the seventeenth century fairytale collection by Italian poet-courtier Giambattista Basile which claim to consist of the earliest versions of our favorite fairytales we’ve read of and witnessed while growing up, the film adapts with liberal creative license three very particular fairytales: La Cerva Fatata (The Enchanted Doe), La Pulce (The Flea) and La Vecchia Scorticata (The Flayed Old Lady). Evidently thus a fairytale-trio of sorts, director Matteo Garrone doesn’t shy away from making some characters as exceedingly dark and desperate; a whole lot more than today’s humanity thinks we’d otherwise be. The primary character of each storyline is spurred by a dangerous obsession each. Be it for sexual gratification, for a child of their own, or for a hobby, many of these obsessions play out to form a very dark, almost unpredictable set of events that are bound to disturb as much as they will bewilder. The decisions the characters of this film make may not always be ideal, but are knee-jerk reactions of a mind lusting after their one ultimate goal.

Of desolation

This is what exactly makes the film as deliciously unique as it is harrowingly blood-curdling. Audience members have a major potential of being put off completely by the movie’s ultimate tonal shock-value, but this does not for a single moment mean that the film is any bad. View it with an open mind, and there are high chances that while processing the film in your head – and believe you me, the movie will most definitely take a helluva time to wrap around your shocked, oft disturbed brain-cells – you will definitely come across to respect it for its many merits at the very least, even if your personal opinion of the film may not be as favorable primarily due to what you may have witnessed. This is primarily because there is a bundle of things that make the film applause-worthy. For one, the collaborative screenplay of Garrone, Edoardo Albinati, Ugo Chiti and Massimo Gaudioso give the characters terrific justification, much so that the ones who are inherently good people get our deserved emotional investment, and the ones who are grey get our (sometimes flabbergasted) fascination; they become character studies that end up being the raging thoughts we’re possessed by once the credits roll and we make an attempt to walk out of the cinemas.

If, amongst the fantastic production design, Peter Suschitzky’s (After Earth) stunning cinematography and the conviction-riddled edit decisions heralded by Marco Spoletini, there is anything I’d be extremely disappointed by, it would be the less-than-impressive visual effects compositing. This is a film which is supposed to blend in the real and the surreal; to make every object created by designers and animators a part of the world we’re watching. The flea and the sea-monster among others, tilt more toward obvious animation than anything else. Which is a damn-shame. Alexandre Desplat’s (The Grand Budapest Hotel) music is another very strong point, bringing the film’s emotional vigor alive.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Of age

Salma Hayek is very good in some portions, and then off-kilter in some. Toby Jones (The Hunger Games:) makes the most impact as the king driven to insanity by his obsession of the flea. Bebe Cave (Great Expectations) is excellent, and handles her role with conviction, coming out a winner especially in the film’s final minutes. Handling a dual role with ease, Christian Lees plays his roles competently. John C. Reilly in his short stint is efficient. Vincent Cassel is terrific. Guillaume Delaunay impresses, especially as he has an extremely difficult, performance-oriented role to pull off. His participation in the role of the Ogre eventually is able to bring out the exact emotions of disgust the film might have aimed to incite within the audience. Stacy Martin and Hayley Carmichael do well with their portrayals what’s ultimately the same character in different ages. Shirley Henderson (Anna Karenina) comes across with a shining performance with her portrayal of a very specific, innate human desperation in the second half of the film. The others are functional.

Worth it?

Il Racconto Dei Racconti is an incredibly bewildering, albeit impressively mounted film that is as disturbingly unpredictable as it is a fascinating character study for its audience. This movie has an insane potential of tearing you apart, flabbergasting you more often than not, and ultimately overwhelming you with way too much information to process immediately after you’ve watched the film. As you end up piecing the film together in the days that go by, however, there’s a lot of potential to understand this melange of fantasy and horror at a relatively deeper stage than you may have the moment you walked out of the cinemas. Doubling as both a fairytale for adults and a look into the depths of human obsession, this Garrone-directed film may not be for everybody, as it decisively pushes many a boundary the potential audience may have unconsciously put around themselves when expecting something of a film. Should you, however, get in with an open mind; one without any set expectations of the genre, then you’d definitely find a lot to admire and respect within the movie; its director’s strong conviction amongst the most important of factors.

If you love cinema, or simply wish to attempt something unlike anything you’ve seen in the cinemas before, this comes across as a definite recommendation. If, however, your preconceived expectations have a potential of getting in the way of how the makers wish to unadulteratedly portray their stories, then you might want to stay away from this.

PS: Don’t let your flailing emotions deter you from accurately judging this piece of work.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
AKA (English Title) Tale of Tales
Cast Salma Hayek
Vincent Cassel
Toby Jones
Director Matteo Garrone
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

Il Racconto Dei Racconti probably boasts one of the strongest casts I’ve seen in a film that’s probably sprung onto us out of practically nowhere. You’ve got Vincent Cassel (Trance), Salma Hayek (Frida) and John C. Reilly (The Promotion) to name among others. And this also marks a probable first for its critical darling of an Italian-language movie director Matteo Garrone: it’s his first English-language film.

But for poor ole me, who hasn’t had a chance to check out a singe film from Garrone’s admittedly impressive filmography (and for whatever little credit I have, his Gomorrah has been a part of my wish-list of movies to watch for a while now), this had me going into something I haven’t been able to decipher even through its rather uncanny trailers.

And here I was, my nerve-wracked self attending a screening of the same, wondering what was in store for me. And for one, even though I had no idea, I knew I may have been in for something I may not have expected. Like ever.

What’s it About?

A queen (Salma Hayek) obsesses for life inside of her, at the cost of anything. A king (Vincent Cassel) obsesses for beauty and sexual gratification. And another king (Toby Jones) obsesses on an eventual pet, at the cost of his sanity and his daughter. What their obsessions drive them to do and how each of their stories pan out forms the rest of the movie.

Of loneliness

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Well, for one, let me admit this: I’d have loved Into the Woods to be as bold, dark and auteur-driven as this film inherently shows itself to be. Every scene in the film has wonder, vigor and bewilderment as potential emotions an audience member could feel inside of them, primarily because despite acting out in the format of three simultaneous fairytales, what this movie does differently is to push the boundaries of what you’re comfortable watching on the big screen.

Based on Lo cunto de li cunti (the Pentamerone), the seventeenth century fairytale collection by Italian poet-courtier Giambattista Basile which claim to consist of the earliest versions of our favorite fairytales we’ve read of and witnessed while growing up, the film adapts with liberal creative license three very particular fairytales: La Cerva Fatata (The Enchanted Doe), La Pulce (The Flea) and La Vecchia Scorticata (The Flayed Old Lady). Evidently thus a fairytale-trio of sorts, director Matteo Garrone doesn’t shy away from making some characters as exceedingly dark and desperate; a whole lot more than today’s humanity thinks we’d otherwise be. The primary character of each storyline is spurred by a dangerous obsession each. Be it for sexual gratification, for a child of their own, or for a hobby, many of these obsessions play out to form a very dark, almost unpredictable set of events that are bound to disturb as much as they will bewilder. The decisions the characters of this film make may not always be ideal, but are knee-jerk reactions of a mind lusting after their one ultimate goal.

Of desolation

This is what exactly makes the film as deliciously unique as it is harrowingly blood-curdling. Audience members have a major potential of being put off completely by the movie’s ultimate tonal shock-value, but this does not for a single moment mean that the film is any bad. View it with an open mind, and there are high chances that while processing the film in your head – and believe you me, the movie will most definitely take a helluva time to wrap around your shocked, oft disturbed brain-cells – you will definitely come across to respect it for its many merits at the very least, even if your personal opinion of the film may not be as favorable primarily due to what you may have witnessed. This is primarily because there is a bundle of things that make the film applause-worthy. For one, the collaborative screenplay of Garrone, Edoardo Albinati, Ugo Chiti and Massimo Gaudioso give the characters terrific justification, much so that the ones who are inherently good people get our deserved emotional investment, and the ones who are grey get our (sometimes flabbergasted) fascination; they become character studies that end up being the raging thoughts we’re possessed by once the credits roll and we make an attempt to walk out of the cinemas.

If, amongst the fantastic production design, Peter Suschitzky’s (After Earth) stunning cinematography and the conviction-riddled edit decisions heralded by Marco Spoletini, there is anything I’d be extremely disappointed by, it would be the less-than-impressive visual effects compositing. This is a film which is supposed to blend in the real and the surreal; to make every object created by designers and animators a part of the world we’re watching. The flea and the sea-monster among others, tilt more toward obvious animation than anything else. Which is a damn-shame. Alexandre Desplat’s (The Grand Budapest Hotel) music is another very strong point, bringing the film’s emotional vigor alive.

Of age

To Perform or Not to Perform

Salma Hayek is very good in some portions, and then off-kilter in some. Toby Jones (The Hunger Games:) makes the most impact as the king driven to insanity by his obsession of the flea. Bebe Cave (Great Expectations) is excellent, and handles her role with conviction, coming out a winner especially in the film’s final minutes. Handling a dual role with ease, Christian Lees plays his roles competently. John C. Reilly in his short stint is efficient. Vincent Cassel is terrific. Guillaume Delaunay impresses, especially as he has an extremely difficult, performance-oriented role to pull off. His participation in the role of the Ogre eventually is able to bring out the exact emotions of disgust the film might have aimed to incite within the audience. Stacy Martin and Hayley Carmichael do well with their portrayals what’s ultimately the same character in different ages. Shirley Henderson (Anna Karenina) comes across with a shining performance with her portrayal of a very specific, innate human desperation in the second half of the film. The others are functional.

Worth it?

Il Racconto Dei Racconti is an incredibly bewildering, albeit impressively mounted film that is as disturbingly unpredictable as it is a fascinating character study for its audience. This movie has an insane potential of tearing you apart, flabbergasting you more often than not, and ultimately overwhelming you with way too much information to process immediately after you’ve watched the film. As you end up piecing the film together in the days that go by, however, there’s a lot of potential to understand this melange of fantasy and horror at a relatively deeper stage than you may have the moment you walked out of the cinemas. Doubling as both a fairytale for adults and a look into the depths of human obsession, this Garrone-directed film may not be for everybody, as it decisively pushes many a boundary the potential audience may have unconsciously put around themselves when expecting something of a film. Should you, however, get in with an open mind; one without any set expectations of the genre, then you’d definitely find a lot to admire and respect within the movie; its director’s strong conviction amongst the most important of factors.

If you love cinema, or simply wish to attempt something unlike anything you’ve seen in the cinemas before, this comes across as a definite recommendation. If, however, your preconceived expectations have a potential of getting in the way of how the makers wish to unadulteratedly portray their stories, then you might want to stay away from this.

PS: Don’t let your flailing emotions deter you from accurately judging this piece of work.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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