Joy

Watchable inconsistency


Joy

  • Watchable inconsistency

Joy

  • Watchable inconsistency


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Jennifer Lawrence
Bradley Cooper
Rober De Niro
Isabella Rossellini
Édgar Ramírez

Written by

David O. Russell
Annie Mumolo

Directed by

David O. Russell



What to Expect

David O. Russell seems to have gotten stronger with each movie of his. Featuring characters that are against type, most of his films tend to make humor a weapon to depict the inner demons of human beings appropriately. Sure, most of it could be looked at as a humored dismissal of mental illnesses (Silver Linings Playbook) and human quirks (American Hustle). When looked at, however, from the other side of the coin, his narratives make more sense than can typically be understood from a linear perspective.

Which is what makes Joy probably the most awaited film of all time. Armed with the potential performative win of Academy Award winner Jennifer Lawrence, viewers are also invited to the possibility of a strong female character being brought brought forward through a film with expected critical acclaim.

And after two fantastic pieces of filmmaking, it wouldn’t be too much for viewers to ask for a third strong film from Russell too, would it?

What’s it About?

Joy lives a broken life with her dysfunctional family – her television-obsessed mother in her bedroom, her doting grandmother and two fantastic children, and (cherry on the cake) her ex-husband in the basement of her own house. Somewhere down the line, she decides to take matters into her own hands, and decides to build an invention – a self-wringing mop. Of course, little does she know that her life is going to have more ups and downs than her straightforward self bargains for.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

All about the fam.

All about the fam.

One of the film’s biggest strengths is how the film’s titular character arc is penned. There’s a lot of emotive organicity that Joy needs through out the film; humans are vulnerable, after all, and we need that kind of room. All of this is unfortunately wasted with a screenplay that’s so inconsistent, it’s almost baffling.

Now, one may wonder where doe the inconsistency come from. It’s quite simple. Russell’s films are normally exceptional in their un-Hollywood narrative structures. He strives to put many of his characters outside of the formulaic bracket, taking the strange narrative in his stride in a confidence that’s not seen in a lot of mainstream directors today. Joy is expected to entrance viewers in the very same dynamic flavor, but it doesn’t. Unlike an American Hustle or Silver Linings Playbook, this movie tries to work with three different narrative styles — the formulaic, the Russell, and the non-linear. The result, should more than one narrative be used, needs a certain focus to defy standards of storytelling. What viewers are provided with, however, are a lot of sporadic highs and shocking lows. The result? Viewers end up highly distracted; never consistently a part of the film like they should be.

Thankfully, the sporadic highs are engaging enough to keep the movie afloat till the end. Sure, viewers may complain about Russell repeating dysfunction over and over. Let us, however, keep this in mind: Russell is one of those rare directors who can understand the act of humanity being messed up. Everything from his utilization of technical filmmaking decisions to narrative decisions support the world being painful, imperfect and all over the place. This passion to show the innards of humanity’s societal evils to the world; the grey area humans live in is what makes Russell’s weakest film an equally fascinating work when looked at individually.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Obvious badassery is obvious

Obvious badassery is obvious

From the supporting actors, the audience can expect a considerable amount from Édgar Ramírez, Bradley Cooper, Diane Ladd and Isabella Rossellini. The rest do perform well, but aren’t given either the time or the space to make a mark. (This sadly includes Robert De Niro).

It is, however, Jennifer Lawrence, whose powerhouse performance thunders its way through the whole film. The movie is an example of how inconsistent films can sometimes work their way through the best performances of its actors. Lawrence is the soul of the film, and brings life to her eponymous protagonist in the way solar energy is of prime importance to photosynthesis. It is of little surprise to me thus that Russell must zero in on her since for last few films in a row.

Worth it?

That Joy is the weakest film in Russell’s filmography is not disputable (well, maybe, but let’s objectively understand the statement). That it isn’t fascinating by a mile and a half is. There’s a lot to love, and a lot else to be disappointed by in, but boy will this still give you quite some things to think about. Else, viewers will definitely find an infectious vibe in the film; they might even find it in themselves to believe – and follow – their own dreams. If all else fails though, viewers will still come out having imprinted the towering act of Jennifer Lawrence, who somehow brings viewers safely to shore.

It’s disappointing, yes; but it’s still watchable once. Hell, some might even like it more than I did (or less than I did), which is why it’s necessary to give this movie just one try to see where you fit. Like the eponymous Forrest Gump says, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”

And I’ve (sadly) never found the statement as truer than ever for any movie than it is with this.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Jennifer Lawrence
Bradley Cooper
Rober De Niro
Isabella Rossellini
Édgar Ramírez

Written by

David O. Russell
Annie Mumolo

Directed by

David O. Russell



What to Expect

David O. Russell seems to have gotten stronger with each movie of his. Featuring characters that are against type, most of his films tend to make humor a weapon to depict the inner demons of human beings appropriately. Sure, most of it could be looked at as a humored dismissal of mental illnesses (Silver Linings Playbook) and human quirks (American Hustle). When looked at, however, from the other side of the coin, his narratives make more sense than can typically be understood from a linear perspective.

Which is what makes Joy probably the most awaited film of all time. Armed with the potential performative win of Academy Award winner Jennifer Lawrence, viewers are also invited to the possibility of a strong female character being brought brought forward through a film with expected critical acclaim.

And after two fantastic pieces of filmmaking, it wouldn’t be too much for viewers to ask for a third strong film from Russell too, would it?

What’s it About?

Joy lives a broken life with her dysfunctional family – her television-obsessed mother in her bedroom, her doting grandmother and two fantastic children, and (cherry on the cake) her ex-husband in the basement of her own house. Somewhere down the line, she decides to take matters into her own hands, and decides to build an invention – a self-wringing mop. Of course, little does she know that her life is going to have more ups and downs than her straightforward self bargains for.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

All about the fam.

All about the fam.

One of the film’s biggest strengths is how the film’s titular character arc is penned. There’s a lot of emotive organicity that Joy needs through out the film; humans are vulnerable, after all, and we need that kind of room. All of this is unfortunately wasted with a screenplay that’s so inconsistent, it’s almost baffling.

Now, one may wonder where doe the inconsistency come from. It’s quite simple. Russell’s films are normally exceptional in their un-Hollywood narrative structures. He strives to put many of his characters outside of the formulaic bracket, taking the strange narrative in his stride in a confidence that’s not seen in a lot of mainstream directors today. Joy is expected to entrance viewers in the very same dynamic flavor, but it doesn’t. Unlike an American Hustle or Silver Linings Playbook, this movie tries to work with three different narrative styles — the formulaic, the Russell, and the non-linear. The result, should more than one narrative be used, needs a certain focus to defy standards of storytelling. What viewers are provided with, however, are a lot of sporadic highs and shocking lows. The result? Viewers end up highly distracted; never consistently a part of the film like they should be.

Thankfully, the sporadic highs are engaging enough to keep the movie afloat till the end. Sure, viewers may complain about Russell repeating dysfunction over and over. Let us, however, keep this in mind: Russell is one of those rare directors who can understand the act of humanity being messed up. Everything from his utilization of technical filmmaking decisions to narrative decisions support the world being painful, imperfect and all over the place. This passion to show the innards of humanity’s societal evils to the world; the grey area humans live in is what makes Russell’s weakest film an equally fascinating work when looked at individually.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Obvious badassery is obvious

Obvious badassery is obvious

From the supporting actors, the audience can expect a considerable amount from Édgar Ramírez, Bradley Cooper, Diane Ladd and Isabella Rossellini. The rest do perform well, but aren’t given either the time or the space to make a mark. (This sadly includes Robert De Niro).

It is, however, Jennifer Lawrence, whose powerhouse performance thunders its way through the whole film. The movie is an example of how inconsistent films can sometimes work their way through the best performances of its actors. Lawrence is the soul of the film, and brings life to her eponymous protagonist in the way solar energy is of prime importance to photosynthesis. It is of little surprise to me thus that Russell must zero in on her since for last few films in a row.

Worth it?

That Joy is the weakest film in Russell’s filmography is not disputable (well, maybe, but let’s objectively understand the statement). That it isn’t fascinating by a mile and a half is. There’s a lot to love, and a lot else to be disappointed by in, but boy will this still give you quite some things to think about. Else, viewers will definitely find an infectious vibe in the film; they might even find it in themselves to believe – and follow – their own dreams. If all else fails though, viewers will still come out having imprinted the towering act of Jennifer Lawrence, who somehow brings viewers safely to shore.

It’s disappointing, yes; but it’s still watchable once. Hell, some might even like it more than I did (or less than I did), which is why it’s necessary to give this movie just one try to see where you fit. Like the eponymous Forrest Gump says, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”

And I’ve (sadly) never found the statement as truer than ever for any movie than it is with this.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Jennifer Lawrence
Bradley Cooper
Robert De Niro
Director David O. Russell
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

Ah, snow.

Ah, snow.

David O. Russell seems to have gotten stronger with each movie of his. Featuring characters that are against type, most of his films tend to make humor a weapon to depict the inner demons of human beings appropriately. Sure, most of it could be looked at as a humored dismissal of mental illnesses (Silver Linings Playbook) and human quirks (American Hustle). When looked at, however, from the other side of the coin, his narratives make more sense than can typically be understood from a linear perspective.

Which is what makes Joy probably the most awaited film of all time. Armed with the potential performative win of Academy Award winner Jennifer Lawrence, viewers are also invited to the possibility of a strong female character being brought brought forward through a film with expected critical acclaim.

And after two fantastic pieces of filmmaking, it wouldn’t be too much for viewers to ask for a third strong film from Russell too, would it?

What’s it About?

Joy lives a broken life with her dysfunctional family – her television-obsessed mother in her bedroom, her doting grandmother and two fantastic children, and (cherry on the cake) her ex-husband in the basement of her own house. Somewhere down the line, she decides to take matters into her own hands, and decides to build an invention – a self-wringing mop. Of course, little does she know that her life is going to have more ups and downs than her straightforward self bargains for.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

All about the fam.

All about the fam.

One of the film’s biggest strengths is how the film’s titular character arc is penned. There’s a lot of emotive organicity that Joy needs through out the film; humans are vulnerable, after all, and we need that kind of room. All of this is unfortunately wasted with a screenplay that’s so inconsistent, it’s almost baffling.

Now, one may wonder where doe the inconsistency come from. It’s quite simple. Russell’s films are normally exceptional in their un-Hollywood narrative structures. He strives to put many of his characters outside of the formulaic bracket, taking the strange narrative in his stride in a confidence that’s not seen in a lot of mainstream directors today. Joy is expected to entrance viewers in the very same dynamic flavor, but it doesn’t. Unlike an American Hustle or Silver Linings Playbook, this movie tries to work with three different narrative styles — the formulaic, the Russell, and the non-linear. The result, should more than one narrative be used, needs a certain focus to defy standards of storytelling. What viewers are provided with, however, are a lot of sporadic highs and shocking lows. The result? Viewers end up highly distracted; never consistently a part of the film like they should be.

Thankfully, the sporadic highs are engaging enough to keep the movie afloat till the end. Sure, viewers may complain about Russell repeating dysfunction over and over. Let us, however, keep this in mind: Russell is one of those rare directors who can understand the act of humanity being messed up. Everything from his utilization of technical filmmaking decisions to narrative decisions support the world being painful, imperfect and all over the place. This passion to show the innards of humanity’s societal evils to the world; the grey area humans live in is what makes Russell’s weakest film an equally fascinating work when looked at individually.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Obvious badassery is obvious

Obvious badassery is obvious

From the supporting actors, the audience can expect a considerable amount from Édgar Ramírez, Bradley Cooper, Diane Ladd and Isabella Rossellini. The rest do perform well, but aren’t given either the time or the space to make a mark. (This sadly includes Robert De Niro).

It is, however, Jennifer Lawrence, whose powerhouse performance thunders its way through the whole film. The movie is an example of how inconsistent films can sometimes work their way through the best performances of its actors. Lawrence is the soul of the film, and brings life to her eponymous protagonist in the way solar energy is of prime importance to photosynthesis. It is of little surprise to me thus that Russell must zero in on her since for last few films in a row.

Worth it?

That Joy is the weakest film in Russell’s filmography is not disputable (well, maybe, but let’s objectively understand the statement). That it isn’t fascinating by a mile and a half is. There’s a lot to love, and a lot else to be disappointed by in, but boy will this still give you quite some things to think about. Else, viewers will definitely find an infectious vibe in the film; they might even find it in themselves to believe – and follow – their own dreams. If all else fails though, viewers will still come out having imprinted the towering act of Jennifer Lawrence, who somehow brings viewers safely to shore.

It’s disappointing, yes; but it’s still watchable once. Hell, some might even like it more than I did (or less than I did), which is why it’s necessary to give this movie just one try to see where you fit. Like the eponymous Forrest Gump says, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”

And I’ve (sadly) never found the statement as truer than ever for any movie than it is with this.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Jennifer Lawrence
Bradley Cooper
Robert De Niro
Director David O. Russell
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

David O. Russell seems to have gotten stronger with each movie of his. Featuring characters that are against type, most of his films tend to make humor a weapon to depict the inner demons of human beings appropriately. Sure, most of it could be looked at as a humored dismissal of mental illnesses (Silver Linings Playbook) and human quirks (American Hustle). When looked at, however, from the other side of the coin, his narratives make more sense than can typically be understood from a linear perspective.

Which is what makes Joy probably the most awaited film of all time. Armed with the potential performative win of Academy Award winner Jennifer Lawrence, viewers are also invited to the possibility of a strong female character being brought brought forward through a film with expected critical acclaim.

And after two fantastic pieces of filmmaking, it wouldn’t be too much for viewers to ask for a third strong film from Russell too, would it?

What’s it About?

Joy lives a broken life with her dysfunctional family – her television-obsessed mother in her bedroom, her doting grandmother and two fantastic children, and (cherry on the cake) her ex-husband in the basement of her own house. Somewhere down the line, she decides to take matters into her own hands, and decides to build an invention – a self-wringing mop. Of course, little does she know that her life is going to have more ups and downs than her straightforward self bargains for.

All about the fam

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

One of the film’s biggest strengths is how the film’s titular character arc is penned. There’s a lot of emotive organicity that Joy needs through out the film; humans are vulnerable, after all, and we need that kind of room. All of this is unfortunately wasted with a screenplay that’s so inconsistent, it’s almost baffling.

Now, one may wonder where doe the inconsistency come from. It’s quite simple. Russell’s films are normally exceptional in their un-Hollywood narrative structures. He strives to put many of his characters outside of the formulaic bracket, taking the strange narrative in his stride in a confidence that’s not seen in a lot of mainstream directors today. Joy is expected to entrance viewers in the very same dynamic flavor, but it doesn’t. Unlike an American Hustle or Silver Linings Playbook, this movie tries to work with three different narrative styles — the formulaic, the Russell, and the non-linear. The result, should more than one narrative be used, needs a certain focus to defy standards of storytelling. What viewers are provided with, however, are a lot of sporadic highs and shocking lows. The result? Viewers end up highly distracted; never consistently a part of the film like they should be.

Thankfully, the sporadic highs are engaging enough to keep the movie afloat till the end. Sure, viewers may complain about Russell repeating dysfunction over and over. Let us, however, keep this in mind: Russell is one of those rare directors who can understand the act of humanity being messed up. Everything from his utilization of technical filmmaking decisions to narrative decisions support the world being painful, imperfect and all over the place. This passion to show the innards of humanity’s societal evils to the world; the grey area humans live in is what makes Russell’s weakest film an equally fascinating work when looked at individually.

Obvious badassery is obvious

To Perform or Not to Perform

From the supporting actors, the audience can expect a considerable amount from Édgar Ramírez, Bradley Cooper, Diane Ladd and Isabella Rossellini. The rest do perform well, but aren’t given either the time or the space to make a mark. (This sadly includes Robert De Niro).

It is, however, Jennifer Lawrence, whose powerhouse performance thunders its way through the whole film. The movie is an example of how inconsistent films can sometimes work their way through the best performances of its actors. Lawrence is the soul of the film, and brings life to her eponymous protagonist in the way solar energy is of prime importance to photosynthesis. It is of little surprise to me thus that Russell must zero in on her since for last few films in a row.

Worth it?

That Joy is the weakest film in Russell’s filmography is not disputable (well, maybe, but let’s objectively understand the statement). That it isn’t fascinating by a mile and a half is. There’s a lot to love, and a lot else to be disappointed by in, but boy will this still give you quite some things to think about. Else, viewers will definitely find an infectious vibe in the film; they might even find it in themselves to believe – and follow – their own dreams. If all else fails though, viewers will still come out having imprinted the towering act of Jennifer Lawrence, who somehow brings viewers safely to shore.

It’s disappointing, yes; but it’s still watchable once. Hell, some might even like it more than I did (or less than I did), which is why it’s necessary to give this movie just one try to see where you fit. Like the eponymous Forrest Gump says, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”

And I’ve (sadly) never found the statement as truer than ever for any movie than it is with this.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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