Jurassic World

The Spielberg spirit (somewhat) revived!


Jurassic World

Starring: Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard
Directed by: Colin Trevorrow

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

Jurassic World

Starring: Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard
Directed by: Colin Trevorrow

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Pratt
Bryce Dallas Howard
Judy Greer
Vincent D’Onofrio
Ty Simpkins
Nick Robinson

Written by

Rick Jaffa
Amanda Silver
Derek Connolly
Colin Trevorrow

Directed by

Colin Trevorrow


What to Expect

It’s been 22 years since one of the forefathers of the ‘summer blockbuster’ was released. I was never a huge fan of Jurassic Park aside from its technical innovation and proficiency, and it lays the foundations for what we’ve come to expect from a “bums in seats” summer release – to make you believe, and to make you jump out of your seat. And the original succeeded on both counts. That being said, Jurassic World has a much easier job, as it doesn’t have to contend with the original as much as eradicating the absolutely horrendous sequels that preceded it. There’s the painful memory of the absolutely dreadful The Lost World and Jurassic Park III, and within the parameters of simply not making a film that’s similar to the sequels, Jurassic World does its job quite well.

In all seriousness though, it’s the kind of film that requires no real mental commitment from an audience member. Pure popcorn fun.

What’s it About?

Set 22 years after the original, the first film’s Jurassic Park has now become a theme park, aptly named Jurassic World. Except that it isn’t attracting enough visitors. So to keep things hip and entertaining, a dinosaur known as the Indominus Rex – a faster, quicker and stronger version of the Tyrannosaurus Rex (the original’s main antagonist) is created. Think of it as Robert Patrick’s T-1000 to Arnie’s T-800 in T2: Judgment Day; Rex 2.0 if you will.

Clearly and predictably, everyone is now in danger, and you can sort of map out the rest of the film. Thrust into the epicenter of the storm is a Velociraptor trainer named Owen Grady (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), a sort of Dino therapist, and Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard), an operations manager who must not only come to terms with the fact that she helped create this monster, but also try to find and rescue her two nephews (Nick Robinson, Ty Simpkins) who are visiting Jurassic World. Together, their mission is to stop this lab dino from wiping out the park.

In short, exactly what you thought it would be.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Did Jurassic World need to be made? Arguably. It doesn’t excel in any specific area and isn’t exceptional in any specific way. The set-pieces as predicted are excellent and, to be honest, the real reason anyone is watching the film. If you’re expecting Oscar-caliber writing and performances, save your bucks. The structure is solid and moves well towards a climatic finale, which is silly at times but not worth complaining about. The CGI is often overblown but the dinosaurs look as good as they did in the original, which is more of a testament to how the original has stood the test of time.

Colin Trevorrow’s direction is solid, if not spectacular. Hey may not be in the mold of the top action directors working today, but he appears to be in control without letting the film run sloppy, whilst also clearly ticking the genre’s go to narrative arcs. He is evidently a fan though, with an array of homages both to the original and, less visibly, Hitchcock. The writing by Trevorrow and Rick Jaffa is simple and to the point, which isn’t always a compliment, but delivers on thrills and action sequences. The music by Michael Giacchino builds on the previous work of John Williams, and the use of the original theme is a welcome touch.

The weakness, which certainly pegs the film back, is in the narrative. It provides no surprises, and never deviates from the direction every audience member is expecting it to take. It’s laid out in a very film-101 narrative structure; human meddling with the animal kingdom, chaos ensues, villains rise, heroes rise even further, climatic battle, credits, toilet stop, car park, home. You crave the intelligence that the film thinks it has but fails to demonstrate at any point.

Unlike its predecessors though, Jurassic World is certainly a rejuvenating adrenaline shot for the series. It relies on solid thrills and an excellently created leading cast of CGI dinos to keep everyone entertained.

To Perform or Not to Perform

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

I’ll call the ‘leads’ in the film the supporting cast, as we all know who the centerstage belongs to. Everyone seems to be enjoying Chris Pratt and his meteoric rise but I feel he is on the road to Seth Rogen typecast syndrome. From Parks & Recreation to Jurassic World, he is a cut-and-paste character in a majority of his appearances. This devalues his performance here to my personal liking, but for fans of Chris’ on screen style, he is as reliable as ever.

The real acting talent on show belongs to the ridiculously underrated Bryce Dallas Howard. Luckily the clip famously bashed by Avengers helmer Joss Whedon was just a mistimed flash in the pan. Dallas Howard isn’t simply feminine fodder but actually the heart of Jurassic World. Her transformative character arc is delivered brilliantly, as she starts the film off as the corporate cog who then sets along a road to redemption. It’s a pleasure watching her work. Both actors build a solid foundation for the franchise to move forward.

Characters that are never molded or developed into anything worth remembering round up the rest of the cast. Seasoned performers such as Judy Greer and Vincent D’Onofrio are simply filler. Something forthcoming sequels will need to improve with writing and possibly better casting. We’ll call them Dino chum for now.

Worth it?

You could argue that if successful, Jurassic World could be to the current young generation of filmgoers what Star Wars was to the former generation, and I say that in the loosest context possible. If the franchise continues on this predictable – yet solid – road, it could prove to be very successful. It is certainly a fun summer blockbuster that will definitely have newcomers and fans excited to see dinosaurs back on the big screen again. It is an evolution in quality from the previous two sequels, and efficiently combines a solid mix of good photography, special effects and character work. Better writing and a well-rounded supporting cast can do wonders for this franchise in the years to come.

In all honesty though, if you enjoyed the original you’ll enjoy this for one simple reason: the original is flanked with the same positives and negatives surrounding this film. In essence, anyone who hated this film should hate the original too; otherwise they would just be contradicting themselves.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Husam Jayyusi

Purist ass. Nolan hater. 3D annihilator. Cinephile. Jedi.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Pratt
Bryce Dallas Howard
Judy Greer
Vincent D’Onofrio
Ty Simpkins
Nick Robinson

Written by

Rick Jaffa
Amanda Silver
Derek Connolly
Colin Trevorrow

Directed by

Colin Trevorrow


What to Expect

It’s been 22 years since one of the forefathers of the ‘summer blockbuster’ was released. I was never a huge fan of Jurassic Park aside from its technical innovation and proficiency, and it lays the foundations for what we’ve come to expect from a “bums in seats” summer release – to make you believe, and to make you jump out of your seat. And the original succeeded on both counts. That being said, Jurassic World has a much easier job, as it doesn’t have to contend with the original as much as eradicating the absolutely horrendous sequels that preceded it. There’s the painful memory of the absolutely dreadful The Lost World and Jurassic Park III, and within the parameters of simply not making a film that’s similar to the sequels, Jurassic World does its job quite well.

In all seriousness though, it’s the kind of film that requires no real mental commitment from an audience member. Pure popcorn fun.

What’s it About?

Set 22 years after the original, the first film’s Jurassic Park has now become a theme park, aptly named Jurassic World. Except that it isn’t attracting enough visitors. So to keep things hip and entertaining, a dinosaur known as the Indominus Rex – a faster, quicker and stronger version of the Tyrannosaurus Rex (the original’s main antagonist) is created. Think of it as Robert Patrick’s T-1000 to Arnie’s T-800 in T2: Judgment Day; Rex 2.0 if you will.

Clearly and predictably, everyone is now in danger, and you can sort of map out the rest of the film. Thrust into the epicenter of the storm is a Velociraptor trainer named Owen Grady (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), a sort of Dino therapist, and Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard), an operations manager who must not only come to terms with the fact that she helped create this monster, but also try to find and rescue her two nephews (Nick Robinson, Ty Simpkins) who are visiting Jurassic World. Together, their mission is to stop this lab dino from wiping out the park.

In short, exactly what you thought it would be.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Did Jurassic World need to be made? Arguably. It doesn’t excel in any specific area and isn’t exceptional in any specific way. The set-pieces as predicted are excellent and, to be honest, the real reason anyone is watching the film. If you’re expecting Oscar-caliber writing and performances, save your bucks. The structure is solid and moves well towards a climatic finale, which is silly at times but not worth complaining about. The CGI is often overblown but the dinosaurs look as good as they did in the original, which is more of a testament to how the original has stood the test of time.

Colin Trevorrow’s direction is solid, if not spectacular. Hey may not be in the mold of the top action directors working today, but he appears to be in control without letting the film run sloppy, whilst also clearly ticking the genre’s go to narrative arcs. He is evidently a fan though, with an array of homages both to the original and, less visibly, Hitchcock. The writing by Trevorrow and Rick Jaffa is simple and to the point, which isn’t always a compliment, but delivers on thrills and action sequences. The music by Michael Giacchino builds on the previous work of John Williams, and the use of the original theme is a welcome touch.

The weakness, which certainly pegs the film back, is in the narrative. It provides no surprises, and never deviates from the direction every audience member is expecting it to take. It’s laid out in a very film-101 narrative structure; human meddling with the animal kingdom, chaos ensues, villains rise, heroes rise even further, climatic battle, credits, toilet stop, car park, home. You crave the intelligence that the film thinks it has but fails to demonstrate at any point.

Unlike its predecessors though, Jurassic World is certainly a rejuvenating adrenaline shot for the series. It relies on solid thrills and an excellently created leading cast of CGI dinos to keep everyone entertained.

To Perform or Not to Perform

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

I’ll call the ‘leads’ in the film the supporting cast, as we all know who the centerstage belongs to. Everyone seems to be enjoying Chris Pratt and his meteoric rise but I feel he is on the road to Seth Rogen typecast syndrome. From Parks & Recreation to Jurassic World, he is a cut-and-paste character in a majority of his appearances. This devalues his performance here to my personal liking, but for fans of Chris’ on screen style, he is as reliable as ever.

The real acting talent on show belongs to the ridiculously underrated Bryce Dallas Howard. Luckily the clip famously bashed by Avengers helmer Joss Whedon was just a mistimed flash in the pan. Dallas Howard isn’t simply feminine fodder but actually the heart of Jurassic World. Her transformative character arc is delivered brilliantly, as she starts the film off as the corporate cog who then sets along a road to redemption. It’s a pleasure watching her work. Both actors build a solid foundation for the franchise to move forward.

Characters that are never molded or developed into anything worth remembering round up the rest of the cast. Seasoned performers such as Judy Greer and Vincent D’Onofrio are simply filler. Something forthcoming sequels will need to improve with writing and possibly better casting. We’ll call them Dino chum for now.

Worth it?

You could argue that if successful, Jurassic World could be to the current young generation of filmgoers what Star Wars was to the former generation, and I say that in the loosest context possible. If the franchise continues on this predictable – yet solid – road, it could prove to be very successful. It is certainly a fun summer blockbuster that will definitely have newcomers and fans excited to see dinosaurs back on the big screen again. It is an evolution in quality from the previous two sequels, and efficiently combines a solid mix of good photography, special effects and character work. Better writing and a well-rounded supporting cast can do wonders for this franchise in the years to come.

In all honesty though, if you enjoyed the original you’ll enjoy this for one simple reason: the original is flanked with the same positives and negatives surrounding this film. In essence, anyone who hated this film should hate the original too; otherwise they would just be contradicting themselves.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Husam Jayyusi

Purist ass. Nolan hater. 3D annihilator. Cinephile. Jedi.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!

What to Expect

Jurassic World - Key Art

“Hey Dino! Sup dawg?”

It’s been 22 years since one of the forefathers of the ‘summer blockbuster’ was released. I was never a huge fan of Jurassic Park aside from its technical innovation and proficiency, and it lays the foundations for what we’ve come to expect from a “bums in seats” summer release – to make you believe, and to make you jump out of your seat. And the original succeeded on both counts. That being said, Jurassic World has a much easier job, as it doesn’t have to contend with the original as much as eradicating the absolutely horrendous sequels that preceded it. There’s the painful memory of the absolutely dreadful The Lost World and Jurassic Park III, and within the parameters of simply not making a film that’s similar to the sequels, Jurassic World does its job quite well.

In all seriousness though, it’s the kind of film that requires no real mental commitment from an audience member. Pure popcorn fun.

What’s it About?

Set 22 years after the original, the first film’s Jurassic Park has now become a theme park, aptly named Jurassic World. Except that it isn’t attracting enough visitors. So to keep things hip and entertaining, a dinosaur known as the Indominus Rex – a faster, quicker and stronger version of the Tyrannosaurus Rex (the original’s main antagonist) is created. Think of it as Robert Patrick’s T-1000 to Arnie’s T-800 in T2: Judgment Day; Rex 2.0 if you will.

Clearly and predictably, everyone is now in danger, and you can sort of map out the rest of the film. Thrust into the epicenter of the storm is a Velociraptor trainer named Owen Grady (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), a sort of Dino therapist, and Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard), an operations manager who must not only come to terms with the fact that she helped create this monster, but also try to find and rescue her two nephews (Nick Robinson, Ty Simpkins) who are visiting Jurassic World. Together, their mission is to stop this lab dino from wiping out the park.

In short, exactly what you thought it would be.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Did Jurassic World need to be made? Arguably. It doesn’t excel in any specific area and isn’t exceptional in any specific way. The set-pieces as predicted are excellent and, to be honest, the real reason anyone is watching the film. If you’re expecting Oscar-caliber writing and performances, save your bucks. The structure is solid and moves well towards a climatic finale, which is silly at times but not worth complaining about. The CGI is often overblown but the dinosaurs look as good as they did in the original, which is more of a testament to how the original has stood the test of time.

Colin Trevorrow’s direction is solid, if not spectacular. Hey may not be in the mold of the top action directors working today, but he appears to be in control without letting the film run sloppy, whilst also clearly ticking the genre’s go to narrative arcs. He is evidently a fan though, with an array of homages both to the original and, less visibly, Hitchcock. The writing by Trevorrow and Rick Jaffa is simple and to the point, which isn’t always a compliment, but delivers on thrills and action sequences. The music by Michael Giacchino builds on the previous work of John Williams, and the use of the original theme is a welcome touch.

The weakness, which certainly pegs the film back, is in the narrative. It provides no surprises, and never deviates from the direction every audience member is expecting it to take. It’s laid out in a very film-101 narrative structure; human meddling with the animal kingdom, chaos ensues, villains rise, heroes rise even further, climatic battle, credits, toilet stop, car park, home. You crave the intelligence that the film thinks it has but fails to demonstrate at any point.

Unlike its predecessors though, Jurassic World is certainly a rejuvenating adrenaline shot for the series. It relies on solid thrills and an excellently created leading cast of CGI dinos to keep everyone entertained.

To Perform or Not to Perform

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

I’ll call the ‘leads’ in the film the supporting cast, as we all know who the centerstage belongs to. Everyone seems to be enjoying Chris Pratt and his meteoric rise but I feel he is on the road to Seth Rogen typecast syndrome. From Parks & Recreation to Jurassic World, he is a cut-and-paste character in a majority of his appearances. This devalues his performance here to my personal liking, but for fans of Chris’ on screen style, he is as reliable as ever.

The real acting talent on show belongs to the ridiculously underrated Bryce Dallas Howard. Luckily the clip famously bashed by Avengers helmer Joss Whedon was just a mistimed flash in the pan. Dallas Howard isn’t simply feminine fodder but actually the heart of Jurassic World. Her transformative character arc is delivered brilliantly, as she starts the film off as the corporate cog who then sets along a road to redemption. It’s a pleasure watching her work. Both actors build a solid foundation for the franchise to move forward.

Characters that are never molded or developed into anything worth remembering round up the rest of the cast. Seasoned performers such as Judy Greer and Vincent D’Onofrio are simply filler. Something forthcoming sequels will need to improve with writing and possibly better casting. We’ll call them Dino chum for now.

Worth it?

You could argue that if successful, Jurassic World could be to the current young generation of filmgoers what Star Wars was to the former generation, and I say that in the loosest context possible. If the franchise continues on this predictable – yet solid – road, it could prove to be very successful. It is certainly a fun summer blockbuster that will definitely have newcomers and fans excited to see dinosaurs back on the big screen again. It is an evolution in quality from the previous two sequels, and efficiently combines a solid mix of good photography, special effects and character work. Better writing and a well-rounded supporting cast can do wonders for this franchise in the years to come.

In all honesty though, if you enjoyed the original you’ll enjoy this for one simple reason: the original is flanked with the same positives and negatives surrounding this film. In essence, anyone who hated this film should hate the original too; otherwise they would just be contradicting themselves.

About the Author

Husam Jayyusi

Purist ass. Nolan hater. 3D annihilator. Cinephile. Jedi.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us

What to Expect

Jurassic World - Key Art

“Hey Dino! Sup dawg?”

It’s been 22 years since one of the forefathers of the ‘summer blockbuster’ was released. I was never a huge fan of Jurassic Park aside from its technical innovation and proficiency, and it lays the foundations for what we’ve come to expect from a “bums in seats” summer release – to make you believe, and to make you jump out of your seat. And the original succeeded on both counts. That being said, Jurassic World has a much easier job, as it doesn’t have to contend with the original as much as eradicating the absolutely horrendous sequels that preceded it. There’s the painful memory of the absolutely dreadful The Lost World and Jurassic Park III, and within the parameters of simply not making a film that’s similar to the sequels, Jurassic World does its job quite well.

In all seriousness though, it’s the kind of film that requires no real mental commitment from an audience member. Pure popcorn fun.

What’s it About?

Set 22 years after the original, the first film’s Jurassic Park has now become a theme park, aptly named Jurassic World. Except that it isn’t attracting enough visitors. So to keep things hip and entertaining, a dinosaur known as the Indominus Rex – a faster, quicker and stronger version of the Tyrannosaurus Rex (the original’s main antagonist) is created. Think of it as Robert Patrick’s T-1000 to Arnie’s T-800 in T2: Judgment Day; Rex 2.0 if you will.

Clearly and predictably, everyone is now in danger, and you can sort of map out the rest of the film. Thrust into the epicenter of the storm is a Velociraptor trainer named Owen Grady (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), a sort of Dino therapist, and Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard), an operations manager who must not only come to terms with the fact that she helped create this monster, but also try to find and rescue her two nephews (Nick Robinson, Ty Simpkins) who are visiting Jurassic World. Together, their mission is to stop this lab dino from wiping out the park.

In short, exactly what you thought it would be.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Whoa whoa easy! Easy!

Did Jurassic World need to be made? Arguably. It doesn’t excel in any specific area and isn’t exceptional in any specific way. The set-pieces as predicted are excellent and, to be honest, the real reason anyone is watching the film. If you’re expecting Oscar-caliber writing and performances, save your bucks. The structure is solid and moves well towards a climatic finale, which is silly at times but not worth complaining about. The CGI is often overblown but the dinosaurs look as good as they did in the original, which is more of a testament to how the original has stood the test of time.

Colin Trevorrow’s direction is solid, if not spectacular. Hey may not be in the mold of the top action directors working today, but he appears to be in control without letting the film run sloppy, whilst also clearly ticking the genre’s go to narrative arcs. He is evidently a fan though, with an array of homages both to the original and, less visibly, Hitchcock. The writing by Trevorrow and Rick Jaffa is simple and to the point, which isn’t always a compliment, but delivers on thrills and action sequences. The music by Michael Giacchino builds on the previous work of John Williams, and the use of the original theme is a welcome touch.

The weakness, which certainly pegs the film back, is in the narrative. It provides no surprises, and never deviates from the direction every audience member is expecting it to take. It’s laid out in a very film-101 narrative structure; human meddling with the animal kingdom, chaos ensues, villains rise, heroes rise even further, climatic battle, credits, toilet stop, car park, home. You crave the intelligence that the film thinks it has but fails to demonstrate at any point.

Unlike its predecessors though, Jurassic World is certainly a rejuvenating adrenaline shot for the series. It relies on solid thrills and an excellently created leading cast of CGI dinos to keep everyone entertained.

To Perform or Not to Perform

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

OH MY GOD BROKEN TECH SWEET SHIT!

I’ll call the ‘leads’ in the film the supporting cast, as we all know who the centerstage belongs to. Everyone seems to be enjoying Chris Pratt and his meteoric rise but I feel he is on the road to Seth Rogen typecast syndrome. From Parks & Recreation to Jurassic World, he is a cut-and-paste character in a majority of his appearances. This devalues his performance here to my personal liking, but for fans of Chris’ on screen style, he is as reliable as ever.

The real acting talent on show belongs to the ridiculously underrated Bryce Dallas Howard. Luckily the clip famously bashed by Avengers helmer Joss Whedon was just a mistimed flash in the pan. Dallas Howard isn’t simply feminine fodder but actually the heart of Jurassic World. Her transformative character arc is delivered brilliantly, as she starts the film off as the corporate cog who then sets along a road to redemption. It’s a pleasure watching her work. Both actors build a solid foundation for the franchise to move forward.

Characters that are never molded or developed into anything worth remembering round up the rest of the cast. Seasoned performers such as Judy Greer and Vincent D’Onofrio are simply filler. Something forthcoming sequels will need to improve with writing and possibly better casting. We’ll call them Dino chum for now.

Worth it?

You could argue that if successful, Jurassic World could be to the current young generation of filmgoers what Star Wars was to the former generation, and I say that in the loosest context possible. If the franchise continues on this predictable – yet solid – road, it could prove to be very successful. It is certainly a fun summer blockbuster that will definitely have newcomers and fans excited to see dinosaurs back on the big screen again. It is an evolution in quality from the previous two sequels, and efficiently combines a solid mix of good photography, special effects and character work. Better writing and a well-rounded supporting cast can do wonders for this franchise in the years to come.

In all honesty though, if you enjoyed the original you’ll enjoy this for one simple reason: the original is flanked with the same positives and negatives surrounding this film. In essence, anyone who hated this film should hate the original too; otherwise they would just be contradicting themselves.

About the Author

Husam Jayyusi

Purist ass. Nolan hater. 3D annihilator. Cinephile. Jedi.

Share this Post

Leave a Reply