Kingsman: The Secret Service

Oh yes! VERY nice!


Kingsman: The Secret Service

  • Oh yes! VERY nice!

Kingsman: The Secret Service

  • Oh yes! VERY nice!


Rated

R

Starring

Samuel Jackson
Colin Firth
Taron Egerton
Michael Caine
Sophia Boutella

Written by

Jane Goldman
Matthew Vaughn

Directed by

Matthew Vaughn


coming up

What to Expect

Who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

I, for one, have. And Kingsman, fortunately, seemed like a damn good candidate to satiate this writer’s action-comedy craving. The Achilles’ Heel here, of course, is that most action comedies are rather limp, predictable excuses of either genre. Looking at the trailer of this particular film, superficially, there wouldn’t be much of a difference there.

Except this time, there’s Matthew “Kick-Ass” Vaughn involved.

It’s not always that one’s bestowed upon the responsibility of directing a then-reboot of the X-Men franchise – that, at a time when it desperately needed the critical respite it was flailing to get.

Vaughn brought the whole, rather derailing, franchise back on its track; ready to roll.

That’s not really what he’s solely known for though. Having kicked off his career with the English crime thriller Layer Cake, he swiftly moved over to fantasy with the well-received Stardust before shifting gears yet again by giving the viewers Kick-Ass, which went on to be one of the most entertaining action-comedies of its time.

It’s no big surprise thus, that Vaughn would return to partner with Millar and adapt yet another one of his comic books into a film. Pitch Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Samuel Jackson in the mix, and you’ve got yourself a very interesting set of people to expect something (read “a lot”) from.

The problem, however, lies with expecting anything.

What’s it About?

And Eggsy (Taron Egerton) agrees.

Having lost his father at an early age; having been thrown into a life as topsy-turvy as he’s been in, one can’t help but understand his trust issues with expectations. Hope, however, comes in the form of Harry (Colin Firth; The King’s Speech) – who gets him out of jail as a measure of repaying Eggsy’s late father.

Trusting his instincts, Harry introduces him to the Kingsman Secret Service, allowing Eggsy to hope for a better life than he’s leading. To be a Kingsman, however, isn’t easy, and he’s about to get that in his head sooner than he thinks.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Oh YES! VERY NICE!

“Oh YES! VERY NICE!”

A quintessential spy film – a la James Bond – is basically known for its famous tropes: gadgets, grit, and girls. Vaughn, along with Jane Goldman and creator of the original source Mark Millar, fully realize all of it, which shows. The writing, thus, ends up being enjoyably self-aware and – more importantly – swift, taking little time to build up the film’s main characters. Like in X-Men: First Class and Kick-Ass, the origin story doesn’t rely on “the montage sequence” and instead actually decides to clearly plate out most of the grueling tasks Egerton’s protagonist is put through; only this time, there’s the overall consistency of pace kept well in check. Pepper that up with various references that the film’s trying to tribute – and slyly parody – and you’ve got yourself a rather enjoyable film that’s not just high on wit, but also on some spectacular comic timing even in situations featuring some rather predictable humor. Watch out for the climactic – erm – explosions, cheekily blended in with the appropriate amount of music, only to form an uncanny blend of expectation and unexpected humor.

For all that cheeky adherence to tropes, there are quite a few defiances. While most primary antagonists are chosen usually from a very boring set of stereotypes – both in country of origin and justification – things are shaken up a bit here as we see the antagonist being a normal filthy-rich McDonalds-eating American who thinks he’s Noah, in his own indirect words. Adapted it may be; stale, however, it isn’t. And while the climactic saving-the-world-before-it-blows-up could have just as easily been put through the film, things are shaken up quite a bit instead, thus skyrocketing the tension tenfold. A very good move, methinks.

One of the few sticklers that I’d have would be with the visual effects. While most VFX composited shots work really well – shot extensions et al – it’s evident that the visual effects artists seem to be struggling on the compositing of some shots containing – surprisingly – mere explosions, and a couple of blood spurts. As a major advantage, you’ve got the extremely eye-popping action choreography that’s as swift and fluid in physical motion as it is in visual capture. Its second half contains within itself one of the the most insane action set-pieces anyone’s seen in a while now.

And let’s just say they’re far from finished with taking our breath away.

And thanks to the production design, most of the film seems like we’re watching a rather funnier (yet not as loud) throwback to the genre and meta-genre. Editing makes use of quite a few parallel cuts to show progress of both sides of the protagonist-antagonist spectrum. Henry Jackman’s score, like in X-Men: First Class, is both classy and fun, adding intensity wherever necessary, but composed and orchestrated this time to give a major – and a rather playfully obvious – deja vu.

What’s the most fun about the whole film, however, is that just like Kick-Ass, this one too is unapologetically R-Rated, which adds up highly to its rather unbridled, gleeful energy that other movies would have shamefully missed out on to “cash in” on a larger audience.

To Perform or Not to Perform

My Fair... Not-Lady?

My Fair… Not-Lady?

Colin Firth and Samuel Jackson (RoboCop) are two people who hold the reins in this film. Agile as hell, Firth’s got some of the best action-set pieces to hog. It’s also no harm he’s smooth enough to play Harry Hart effortlessly enough to be him. Jackson looks like he’s having a lot of fun being the antagonist. And while he’s unfortunately still “Samuel Jackson”, the advantage is the very fact that he’s cast to don a character that’s well against-type relative to most of his film choices. Michael Caine (Interstellar) is predictably good enough. Mind you though: Caine may not seem to hold much importance to the film, but there’s a lot that unravels with his character progressively. Relative newbie Taron Egerton is a well-cast, confident performer who plays both the evolving and the evolved surprisingly sans effort. Showing absolutely no signs of discomfort in some rather trickily choreographed action set-pieces, Sophia Boutella (StreetDance 2) moves along, uninhibited and assured. On the performance front, however, she doesn’t get to show much, except for to throw some smirks around the place. Mark Strong (Revolver), who’s not much of a presence initially, shines in the last hour of the film. Feature film debutante Sophie Cookson is pretty good as the rookie agent. Others fit their roles quite well.

Worth it?

Vaughn, in his continuing successful partnership with Millar and Goldman post Kick-Ass, spins up yet another surprisingly fresh action entertainer that’s as much an effective self-aware spy-trope romp as is a giddy R-Rated action movie. It hits the nail on the head on the counts of both classy action and semi-parodic comedy that fortunately steers completely clear of being another Austin Powers.

Now, getting back to the all-important question I started with: who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

Because if you have, Kingsman is most definitely your answer.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

#ReadBuySupport

Amazon



Rated

R

Starring

Samuel Jackson
Colin Firth
Taron Egerton
Michael Caine
Sophia Boutella

Written by

Jane Goldman
Matthew Vaughn

Directed by

Matthew Vaughn


What to Expect

Who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

I, for one, have. And Kingsman, fortunately, seemed like a damn good candidate to satiate this writer’s action-comedy craving. The Achilles’ Heel here, of course, is that most action comedies are rather limp, predictable excuses of either genre. Looking at the trailer of this particular film, superficially, there wouldn’t be much of a difference there.

Except this time, there’s Matthew “Kick-Ass” Vaughn involved.

It’s not always that one’s bestowed upon the responsibility of directing a then-reboot of the X-Men franchise – that, at a time when it desperately needed the critical respite it was flailing to get.

Vaughn brought the whole, rather derailing, franchise back on its track; ready to roll.

That’s not really what he’s solely known for though. Having kicked off his career with the English crime thriller Layer Cake, he swiftly moved over to fantasy with the well-received Stardust before shifting gears yet again by giving the viewers Kick-Ass, which went on to be one of the most entertaining action-comedies of its time.

It’s no big surprise thus, that Vaughn would return to partner with Millar and adapt yet another one of his comic books into a film. Pitch Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Samuel Jackson in the mix, and you’ve got yourself a very interesting set of people to expect something (read “a lot”) from.

The problem, however, lies with expecting anything.

What’s it About?

And Eggsy (Taron Egerton) agrees.

Having lost his father at an early age; having been thrown into a life as topsy-turvy as he’s been in, one can’t help but understand his trust issues with expectations. Hope, however, comes in the form of Harry (Colin Firth; The King’s Speech) – who gets him out of jail as a measure of repaying Eggsy’s late father.

Trusting his instincts, Harry introduces him to the Kingsman Secret Service, allowing Eggsy to hope for a better life than he’s leading. To be a Kingsman, however, isn’t easy, and he’s about to get that in his head sooner than he thinks.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Oh YES! VERY NICE!

“Oh YES! VERY NICE!”

A quintessential spy film – a la James Bond – is basically known for its famous tropes: gadgets, grit, and girls. Vaughn, along with Jane Goldman and creator of the original source Mark Millar, fully realize all of it, which shows. The writing, thus, ends up being enjoyably self-aware and – more importantly – swift, taking little time to build up the film’s main characters. Like in X-Men: First Class and Kick-Ass, the origin story doesn’t rely on “the montage sequence” and instead actually decides to clearly plate out most of the grueling tasks Egerton’s protagonist is put through; only this time, there’s the overall consistency of pace kept well in check. Pepper that up with various references that the film’s trying to tribute – and slyly parody – and you’ve got yourself a rather enjoyable film that’s not just high on wit, but also on some spectacular comic timing even in situations featuring some rather predictable humor. Watch out for the climactic – erm – explosions, cheekily blended in with the appropriate amount of music, only to form an uncanny blend of expectation and unexpected humor.

For all that cheeky adherence to tropes, there are quite a few defiances. While most primary antagonists are chosen usually from a very boring set of stereotypes – both in country of origin and justification – things are shaken up a bit here as we see the antagonist being a normal filthy-rich McDonalds-eating American who thinks he’s Noah, in his own indirect words. Adapted it may be; stale, however, it isn’t. And while the climactic saving-the-world-before-it-blows-up could have just as easily been put through the film, things are shaken up quite a bit instead, thus skyrocketing the tension tenfold. A very good move, methinks.

One of the few sticklers that I’d have would be with the visual effects. While most VFX composited shots work really well – shot extensions et al – it’s evident that the visual effects artists seem to be struggling on the compositing of some shots containing – surprisingly – mere explosions, and a couple of blood spurts. As a major advantage, you’ve got the extremely eye-popping action choreography that’s as swift and fluid in physical motion as it is in visual capture. Its second half contains within itself one of the the most insane action set-pieces anyone’s seen in a while now.

And let’s just say they’re far from finished with taking our breath away.

And thanks to the production design, most of the film seems like we’re watching a rather funnier (yet not as loud) throwback to the genre and meta-genre. Editing makes use of quite a few parallel cuts to show progress of both sides of the protagonist-antagonist spectrum. Henry Jackman’s score, like in X-Men: First Class, is both classy and fun, adding intensity wherever necessary, but composed and orchestrated this time to give a major – and a rather playfully obvious – deja vu.

What’s the most fun about the whole film, however, is that just like Kick-Ass, this one too is unapologetically R-Rated, which adds up highly to its rather unbridled, gleeful energy that other movies would have shamefully missed out on to “cash in” on a larger audience.

To Perform or Not to Perform

My Fair... Not-Lady?

My Fair… Not-Lady?

Colin Firth and Samuel Jackson (RoboCop) are two people who hold the reins in this film. Agile as hell, Firth’s got some of the best action-set pieces to hog. It’s also no harm he’s smooth enough to play Harry Hart effortlessly enough to be him. Jackson looks like he’s having a lot of fun being the antagonist. And while he’s unfortunately still “Samuel Jackson”, the advantage is the very fact that he’s cast to don a character that’s well against-type relative to most of his film choices. Michael Caine (Interstellar) is predictably good enough. Mind you though: Caine may not seem to hold much importance to the film, but there’s a lot that unravels with his character progressively. Relative newbie Taron Egerton is a well-cast, confident performer who plays both the evolving and the evolved surprisingly sans effort. Showing absolutely no signs of discomfort in some rather trickily choreographed action set-pieces, Sophia Boutella (StreetDance 2) moves along, uninhibited and assured. On the performance front, however, she doesn’t get to show much, except for to throw some smirks around the place. Mark Strong (Revolver), who’s not much of a presence initially, shines in the last hour of the film. Feature film debutante Sophie Cookson is pretty good as the rookie agent. Others fit their roles quite well.

Worth it?

Vaughn, in his continuing successful partnership with Millar and Goldman post Kick-Ass, spins up yet another surprisingly fresh action entertainer that’s as much an effective self-aware spy-trope romp as is a giddy R-Rated action movie. It hits the nail on the head on the counts of both classy action and semi-parodic comedy that fortunately steers completely clear of being another Austin Powers.

Now, getting back to the all-important question I started with: who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

Because if you have, Kingsman is most definitely your answer.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

#ReadBuySupport


Cast Taron Egerton
Colin Firth
Samuel Jackson
Director Matthew Vaughn
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive

What to Expect

Austin Powers? AWW HELL NO!

Austin Powers? AWW HELL NO!

Who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

I, for one, have. And Kingsman, fortunately, seemed like a damn good candidate to satiate this writer’s action-comedy craving. The Achilles’ Heel here, of course, is that most action comedies are rather limp, predictable excuses of either genre. Looking at the trailer of this particular film, superficially, there wouldn’t be much of a difference there.

Except this time, there’s Matthew “Kick-Ass” Vaughn involved.

It’s not always that one’s bestowed upon the responsibility of directing a then-reboot of the X-Men franchise – that, at a time when it desperately needed the critical respite it was flailing to get.

Vaughn brought the whole, rather derailing, franchise back on its track; ready to roll.

That’s not really what he’s solely known for though. Having kicked off his career with the English crime thriller Layer Cake, he swiftly moved over to fantasy with the well-received Stardust before shifting gears yet again by giving the viewers Kick-Ass, which went on to be one of the most entertaining action-comedies of its time.

It’s no big surprise thus, that Vaughn would return to partner with Millar and adapt yet another one of his comic books into a film. Pitch Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Samuel Jackson in the mix, and you’ve got yourself a very interesting set of people to expect something (read “a lot”) from.

The problem, however, lies with expecting anything.

What’s it About?

And Eggsy (Taron Egerton) agrees.

Having lost his father at an early age; having been thrown into a life as topsy-turvy as he’s been in, one can’t help but understand his trust issues with expectations. Hope, however, comes in the form of Harry (Colin Firth; The King’s Speech) – who gets him out of jail as a measure of repaying Eggsy’s late father.

Trusting his instincts, Harry introduces him to the Kingsman Secret Service, allowing Eggsy to hope for a better life than he’s leading. To be a Kingsman, however, isn’t easy, and he’s about to get that in his head sooner than he thinks.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Oh YES! VERY NICE!

“Oh YES! VERY NICE!”

A quintessential spy film – a la James Bond – is basically known for its famous tropes: gadgets, grit, and girls. Vaughn, along with Jane Goldman and creator of the original source Mark Millar, fully realize all of it, which shows. The writing, thus, ends up being enjoyably self-aware and – more importantly – swift, taking little time to build up the film’s main characters. Like in X-Men: First Class and Kick-Ass, the origin story doesn’t rely on “the montage sequence” and instead actually decides to clearly plate out most of the grueling tasks Egerton’s protagonist is put through; only this time, there’s the overall consistency of pace kept well in check. Pepper that up with various references that the film’s trying to tribute – and slyly parody – and you’ve got yourself a rather enjoyable film that’s not just high on wit, but also on some spectacular comic timing even in situations featuring some rather predictable humor. Watch out for the climactic – erm – explosions, cheekily blended in with the appropriate amount of music, only to form an uncanny blend of expectation and unexpected humor.

For all that cheeky adherence to tropes, there are quite a few defiances. While most primary antagonists are chosen usually from a very boring set of stereotypes – both in country of origin and justification – things are shaken up a bit here as we see the antagonist being a normal filthy-rich McDonalds-eating American who thinks he’s Noah, in his own indirect words. Adapted it may be; stale, however, it isn’t. And while the climactic saving-the-world-before-it-blows-up could have just as easily been put through the film, things are shaken up quite a bit instead, thus skyrocketing the tension tenfold. A very good move, methinks.

One of the few sticklers that I’d have would be with the visual effects. While most VFX composited shots work really well – shot extensions et al – it’s evident that the visual effects artists seem to be struggling on the compositing of some shots containing – surprisingly – mere explosions, and a couple of blood spurts. As a major advantage, you’ve got the extremely eye-popping action choreography that’s as swift and fluid in physical motion as it is in visual capture. Its second half contains within itself one of the the most insane action set-pieces anyone’s seen in a while now.

And let’s just say they’re far from finished with taking our breath away.

And thanks to the production design, most of the film seems like we’re watching a rather funnier (yet not as loud) throwback to the genre and meta-genre. Editing makes use of quite a few parallel cuts to show progress of both sides of the protagonist-antagonist spectrum. Henry Jackman’s score, like in X-Men: First Class, is both classy and fun, adding intensity wherever necessary, but composed and orchestrated this time to give a major – and a rather playfully obvious – deja vu.

What’s the most fun about the whole film, however, is that just like Kick-Ass, this one too is unapologetically R-Rated, which adds up highly to its rather unbridled, gleeful energy that other movies would have shamefully missed out on to “cash in” on a larger audience.

To Perform or Not to Perform

My Fair... Not-Lady?

My Fair… Not-Lady?

Colin Firth and Samuel Jackson (RoboCop) are two people who hold the reins in this film. Agile as hell, Firth’s got some of the best action-set pieces to hog. It’s also no harm he’s smooth enough to play Harry Hart effortlessly enough to be him. Jackson looks like he’s having a lot of fun being the antagonist. And while he’s unfortunately still “Samuel Jackson”, the advantage is the very fact that he’s cast to don a character that’s well against-type relative to most of his film choices. Michael Caine (Interstellar) is predictably good enough. Mind you though: Caine may not seem to hold much importance to the film, but there’s a lot that unravels with his character progressively. Relative newbie Taron Egerton is a well-cast, confident performer who plays both the evolving and the evolved surprisingly sans effort. Showing absolutely no signs of discomfort in some rather trickily choreographed action set-pieces, Sophia Boutella (StreetDance 2) moves along, uninhibited and assured. On the performance front, however, she doesn’t get to show much, except for to throw some smirks around the place. Mark Strong (Revolver), who’s not much of a presence initially, shines in the last hour of the film. Feature film debutante Sophie Cookson is pretty good as the rookie agent. Others fit their roles quite well.

Worth it?

Vaughn, in his continuing successful partnership with Millar and Goldman post Kick-Ass, spins up yet another surprisingly fresh action entertainer that’s as much an effective self-aware spy-trope romp as is a giddy R-Rated action movie. It hits the nail on the head on the counts of both classy action and semi-parodic comedy that fortunately steers completely clear of being another Austin Powers.

Now, getting back to the all-important question I started with: who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

Because if you have, Kingsman is most definitely your answer.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us

#ReadBuySupport

Cast Taron Egerton
Colin Firth
Samuel Jackson
Director Matthew Vaughn
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

Who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

I, for one, have. And Kingsman, fortunately, seemed like a damn good candidate to satiate this writer’s action-comedy craving. The Achilles’ Heel here, of course, is that most action comedies are rather limp, predictable excuses of either genre. Looking at the trailer of this particular film, superficially, there wouldn’t be much of a difference there.

Except this time, there’s Matthew “Kick-Ass” Vaughn involved.

It’s not always that one’s bestowed upon the responsibility of directing a then-reboot of the X-Men franchise – that, at a time when it desperately needed the critical respite it was flailing to get.

Vaughn brought the whole, rather derailing, franchise back on its track; ready to roll.

That’s not really what he’s solely known for though. Having kicked off his career with the English crime thriller Layer Cake, he swiftly moved over to fantasy with the well-received Stardust before shifting gears yet again by giving the viewers Kick-Ass, which went on to be one of the most entertaining action-comedies of its time.

It’s no big surprise thus, that Vaughn would return to partner with Millar and adapt yet another one of his comic books into a film. Pitch Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Samuel Jackson in the mix, and you’ve got yourself a very interesting set of people to expect something (read “a lot”) from.

The problem, however, lies with expecting anything.

What’s it About?

And Eggsy (Taron Egerton) agrees.

Having lost his father at an early age; having been thrown into a life as topsy-turvy as he’s been in, one can’t help but understand his trust issues with expectations. Hope, however, comes in the form of Harry (Colin Firth; The King’s Speech) – who gets him out of jail as a measure of repaying Eggsy’s late father.

Trusting his instincts, Harry introduces him to the Kingsman Secret Service, allowing Eggsy to hope for a better life than he’s leading. To be a Kingsman, however, isn’t easy, and he’s about to get that in his head sooner than he thinks.

Oh yes! VERY nice!

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A quintessential spy film – a la James Bond – is basically known for its famous tropes: gadgets, grit, and girls. Vaughn, along with Jane Goldman and creator of the original source Mark Millar, fully realize all of it, which shows. The writing, thus, ends up being enjoyably self-aware and – more importantly – swift, taking little time to build up the film’s main characters. Like in X-Men: First Class and Kick-Ass, the origin story doesn’t rely on “the montage sequence” and instead actually decides to clearly plate out most of the grueling tasks Egerton’s protagonist is put through; only this time, there’s the overall consistency of pace kept well in check. Pepper that up with various references that the film’s trying to tribute – and slyly parody – and you’ve got yourself a rather enjoyable film that’s not just high on wit, but also on some spectacular comic timing even in situations featuring some rather predictable humor. Watch out for the climactic – erm – explosions, cheekily blended in with the appropriate amount of music, only to form an uncanny blend of expectation and unexpected humor.

For all that cheeky adherence to tropes, there are quite a few defiances. While most primary antagonists are chosen usually from a very boring set of stereotypes – both in country of origin and justification – things are shaken up a bit here as we see the antagonist being a normal filthy-rich McDonalds-eating American who thinks he’s Noah, in his own indirect words. Adapted it may be; stale, however, it isn’t. And while the climactic saving-the-world-before-it-blows-up could have just as easily been put through the film, things are shaken up quite a bit instead, thus skyrocketing the tension tenfold. A very good move, methinks.

One of the few sticklers that I’d have would be with the visual effects. While most VFX composited shots work really well – shot extensions et al – it’s evident that the visual effects artists seem to be struggling on the compositing of some shots containing – surprisingly – mere explosions, and a couple of blood spurts. As a major advantage, you’ve got the extremely eye-popping action choreography that’s as swift and fluid in physical motion as it is in visual capture. Its second half contains within itself one of the the most insane action set-pieces anyone’s seen in a while now.

And let’s just say they’re far from finished with taking our breath away.

And thanks to the production design, most of the film seems like we’re watching a rather funnier (yet not as loud) throwback to the genre and meta-genre. Editing makes use of quite a few parallel cuts to show progress of both sides of the protagonist-antagonist spectrum. Henry Jackman’s score, like in X-Men: First Class, is both classy and fun, adding intensity wherever necessary, but composed and orchestrated this time to give a major – and a rather playfully obvious – deja vu.

What’s the most fun about the whole film, however, is that just like Kick-Ass, this one too is unapologetically R-Rated, which adds up highly to its rather unbridled, gleeful energy that other movies would have shamefully missed out on to “cash in” on a larger audience.

My Fair... Not-Lady?

To Perform or Not to Perform

Colin Firth and Samuel Jackson (RoboCop) are two people who hold the reins in this film. Agile as hell, Firth’s got some of the best action-set pieces to hog. It’s also no harm he’s smooth enough to play Harry Hart effortlessly enough to be him. Jackson looks like he’s having a lot of fun being the antagonist. And while he’s unfortunately still “Samuel Jackson”, the advantage is the very fact that he’s cast to don a character that’s well against-type relative to most of his film choices. Michael Caine (Interstellar) is predictably good enough. Mind you though: Caine may not seem to hold much importance to the film, but there’s a lot that unravels with his character progressively. Relative newbie Taron Egerton is a well-cast, confident performer who plays both the evolving and the evolved surprisingly sans effort. Showing absolutely no signs of discomfort in some rather trickily choreographed action set-pieces, Sophia Boutella (StreetDance 2) moves along, uninhibited and assured. On the performance front, however, she doesn’t get to show much, except for to throw some smirks around the place. Mark Strong (Revolver), who’s not much of a presence initially, shines in the last hour of the film. Feature film debutante Sophie Cookson is pretty good as the rookie agent. Others fit their roles quite well.

Worth it?

Vaughn, in his continuing successful partnership with Millar and Goldman post Kick-Ass, spins up yet another surprisingly fresh action entertainer that’s as much an effective self-aware spy-trope romp as is a giddy R-Rated action movie. It hits the nail on the head on the counts of both classy action and semi-parodic comedy that fortunately steers completely clear of being another Austin Powers.

Now, getting back to the all-important question I started with: who’s been waiting for a good action comedy?

Because if you have, Kingsman is most definitely your answer.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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