London Has Fallen

Explode yourself back to the 90s


London Has Fallen

  • Explode yourself back to the 90s

London Has Fallen

  • Explode yourself back to the 90s


Rated

R

Starring

Aaron Eckhart
Gerard Butler
Morgan Freeman
Angela Bassett
Charlotte Riley

Written by

Creighton Rothenberger
Katrin Benedikt
Chad St. John
Christian Gudegast

Directed by

Babak Najafi



What to Expect

A definite attempt at cashing in on the surprise success of its predecessor, London Has Fallen is an attempt at rehashing every successful element from the first film. Viewers are presented with distress situation, a formidable enemy, a disgraced and reluctant protagonist’s shot at redemption and—of course—explosions and gunshots leading to a non-veritable finale. The formula for making such films has been used umpteen times, and there is a fully aware audience that likes such movies. It is a good thing then that these films deliver exactly that and anybody expecting otherwise has only themselves to blame.

What’s it About?

The British Prime Minister is dead, unexpectedly, and the world leaders gather for the funeral. Despite the strongest security, there’s a terrorist attack ripping through all the key monuments in London. American President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart; The Dark Knight) is left fending for his life with his trusted aide—the chief of secret service responsible for his security, Mike Banning (Gerard Butler; Gods of Egypt). The rest is a big bunch of terrorists out to get the President and Mike shooting, stabbing and punching him out of it all to safety.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

They want him Harvey Dead

They want him Harvey Dead

Much of this movie is as painfully archaic as its CGI, which seems out of the early 90s, which almost always takes viewers out of what they’re watching. That wouldn’t have been too apparent, had the screenplay and dialogues saved the day. Unfortunately, that doesn’t happen either. Some of the lines mouthed are so bad they’ll make you guffaw. The sight of the people sitting in the War Room in Washington and going ‘Oh God’ at every explosion is a perfect fit for a drinking game, or possible future sketches at major comedy portals. Mike Banning parades the president from point to point instead of laying low because—you know—that’s what the action junkies have paid for: all of that badassery. Most of this movie is devoid of sense or substance, and the set up is clearly designed for every action set piece ever; the movie could have been named ‘action’ and wouldn’t have made any difference to the overall effect.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Actors like Morgan Freeman and Aaron Eckhart are incidental in the movie, and their presence doesn’t hurt but doesn’t do the film any good either. With the kind of experience Gerard Butler has in such roles, most of what he does could as well be him somnambulistically performing.

Worth it?

A resounding NO, if you are looking for anything slightly more than gunshots and explosions. We’ve seen a lot of such movies, and if done well, they still work. Sadly, however, this is not. In a related thought, Olympus Has Fallen released around the same timeline as Roland Emmerich’s creepily similar White House Down, and I wonder if Channing Tatum and Jamie Fox are planning 10 Downing Street Down, next.

I really hope not!

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Aaron Eckhart
Gerard Butler
Morgan Freeman
Angela Bassett
Charlotte Riley

Written by

Creighton Rothenberger
Katrin Benedikt
Chad St. John
Christian Gudegast

Directed by

Babak Najafi



What to Expect

A definite attempt at cashing in on the surprise success of its predecessor, London Has Fallen is an attempt at rehashing every successful element from the first film. Viewers are presented with distress situation, a formidable enemy, a disgraced and reluctant protagonist’s shot at redemption and—of course—explosions and gunshots leading to a non-veritable finale. The formula for making such films has been used umpteen times, and there is a fully aware audience that likes such movies. It is a good thing then that these films deliver exactly that and anybody expecting otherwise has only themselves to blame.

What’s it About?

The British Prime Minister is dead, unexpectedly, and the world leaders gather for the funeral. Despite the strongest security, there’s a terrorist attack ripping through all the key monuments in London. American President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart; The Dark Knight) is left fending for his life with his trusted aide—the chief of secret service responsible for his security, Mike Banning (Gerard Butler; Gods of Egypt). The rest is a big bunch of terrorists out to get the President and Mike shooting, stabbing and punching him out of it all to safety.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

They want him Harvey Dead

They want him Harvey Dead

Much of this movie is as painfully archaic as its CGI, which seems out of the early 90s, which almost always takes viewers out of what they’re watching. That wouldn’t have been too apparent, had the screenplay and dialogues saved the day. Unfortunately, that doesn’t happen either. Some of the lines mouthed are so bad they’ll make you guffaw. The sight of the people sitting in the War Room in Washington and going ‘Oh God’ at every explosion is a perfect fit for a drinking game, or possible future sketches at major comedy portals. Mike Banning parades the president from point to point instead of laying low because—you know—that’s what the action junkies have paid for: all of that badassery. Most of this movie is devoid of sense or substance, and the set up is clearly designed for every action set piece ever; the movie could have been named ‘action’ and wouldn’t have made any difference to the overall effect.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Actors like Morgan Freeman and Aaron Eckhart are incidental in the movie, and their presence doesn’t hurt but doesn’t do the film any good either. With the kind of experience Gerard Butler has in such roles, most of what he does could as well be him somnambulistically performing.

Worth it?

A resounding NO, if you are looking for anything slightly more than gunshots and explosions. We’ve seen a lot of such movies, and if done well, they still work. Sadly, however, this is not. In a related thought, Olympus Has Fallen released around the same timeline as Roland Emmerich’s creepily similar White House Down, and I wonder if Channing Tatum and Jamie Fox are planning 10 Downing Street Down, next.

I really hope not!

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Aaron Eckhart
Gerard Butler
Morgan Freeman
Director Babak Najafi
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

The Big Boom

The Big Boom

A definite attempt at cashing in on the surprise success of its predecessor, London Has Fallen is an attempt at rehashing every successful element from the first film. Viewers are presented with distress situation, a formidable enemy, a disgraced and reluctant protagonist’s shot at redemption and—of course—explosions and gunshots leading to a non-veritable finale. The formula for making such films has been used umpteen times, and there is a fully aware audience that likes such movies. It is a good thing then that these films deliver exactly that and anybody expecting otherwise has only themselves to blame.

What’s it About?

The British Prime Minister is dead, unexpectedly, and the world leaders gather for the funeral. Despite the strongest security, there’s a terrorist attack ripping through all the key monuments in London. American President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart; The Dark Knight) is left fending for his life with his trusted aide—the chief of secret service responsible for his security, Mike Banning (Gerard Butler; Gods of Egypt). The rest is a big bunch of terrorists out to get the President and Mike shooting, stabbing and punching him out of it all to safety.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

They want him Harvey Dead

They want him Harvey Dead

Much of this movie is as painfully archaic as its CGI, which seems out of the early 90s, which almost always takes viewers out of what they’re watching. That wouldn’t have been too apparent, had the screenplay and dialogues saved the day. Unfortunately, that doesn’t happen either. Some of the lines mouthed are so bad they’ll make you guffaw. The sight of the people sitting in the War Room in Washington and going ‘Oh God’ at every explosion is a perfect fit for a drinking game, or possible future sketches at major comedy portals. Mike Banning parades the president from point to point instead of laying low because—you know—that’s what the action junkies have paid for: all of that badassery. Most of this movie is devoid of sense or substance, and the set up is clearly designed for every action set piece ever; the movie could have been named ‘action’ and wouldn’t have made any difference to the overall effect.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Actors like Morgan Freeman and Aaron Eckhart are incidental in the movie, and their presence doesn’t hurt but doesn’t do the film any good either. With the kind of experience Gerard Butler has in such roles, most of what he does could as well be him somnambulistically performing.

Worth it?

A resounding NO, if you are looking for anything slightly more than gunshots and explosions. We’ve seen a lot of such movies, and if done well, they still work. Sadly, however, this is not. In a related thought, Olympus Has Fallen released around the same timeline as Roland Emmerich’s creepily similar White House Down, and I wonder if Channing Tatum and Jamie Fox are planning 10 Downing Street Down, next.

I really hope not!

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Aaron Eckhart
Gerard Butler
Morgan Freeman
Director Babak Najafi
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

What to Expect

A definite attempt at cashing in on the surprise success of its predecessor, London Has Fallen is an attempt at rehashing every successful element from the first film. Viewers are presented with distress situation, a formidable enemy, a disgraced and reluctant protagonist’s shot at redemption and—of course—explosions and gunshots leading to a non-veritable finale. The formula for making such films has been used umpteen times, and there is a fully aware audience that likes such movies. It is a good thing then that these films deliver exactly that and anybody expecting otherwise has only themselves to blame.

What’s it About?

The British Prime Minister is dead, unexpectedly, and the world leaders gather for the funeral. Despite the strongest security, there’s a terrorist attack ripping through all the key monuments in London. American President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart; The Dark Knight) is left fending for his life with his trusted aide—the chief of secret service responsible for his security, Mike Banning (Gerard Butler; Gods of Egypt). The rest is a big bunch of terrorists out to get the President and Mike shooting, stabbing and punching him out of it all to safety.

They want him Harvey Dead

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Much of this movie is as painfully archaic as its CGI, which seems out of the early 90s, which almost always takes viewers out of what they’re watching. That wouldn’t have been too apparent, had the screenplay and dialogues saved the day. Unfortunately, that doesn’t happen either. Some of the lines mouthed are so bad they’ll make you guffaw. The sight of the people sitting in the War Room in Washington and going ‘Oh God’ at every explosion is a perfect fit for a drinking game, or possible future sketches at major comedy portals. Mike Banning parades the president from point to point instead of laying low because—you know—that’s what the action junkies have paid for: all of that badassery. Most of this movie is devoid of sense or substance, and the set up is clearly designed for every action set piece ever; the movie could have been named ‘action’ and wouldn’t have made any difference to the overall effect.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Actors like Morgan Freeman and Aaron Eckhart are incidental in the movie, and their presence doesn’t hurt but doesn’t do the film any good either. With the kind of experience Gerard Butler has in such roles, most of what he does could as well be him somnambulistically performing.

Worth it?

A resounding NO, if you are looking for anything slightly more than gunshots and explosions. We’ve seen a lot of such movies, and if done well, they still work. Sadly, however, this is not. In a related thought, Olympus Has Fallen released around the same timeline as Roland Emmerich’s creepily similar White House Down, and I wonder if Channing Tatum and Jamie Fox are planning 10 Downing Street Down, next.

I really hope not!

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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