Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials

You couldn’t breathe if you wanted to


Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials

  • You couldn’t breathe if you wanted to

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials

  • You couldn’t breathe if you wanted to


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Dylan O’Brien
Kaya Scodelario
Thomas Brodie-Sangster
Dexter Darden
Nathalie Emmanuel

Written by

T. S. Nowlin
James Dashner

Directed by

Wes Ball



coming up

What to Expect

Crunching popcorns, slurping sodas, the one-off (or more frequent) ring of a phone, faint hissing whispers, a cry from a child here or there, a heaving sigh, and at least one kick in the back of your seat; sounds familiar, right? That’s your typical cinema experience in any movie theatre for any movie in the world, whether it’s your most boring dumb-laugh comedy to the most extravagantly charged superhero flick. But for the first time in my decades of cinema-going, I was seized by a movie experience (second only to the experience of its predecessor), where a deafening silence had encompassed the theatre for the entire runtime. A silence louder than a standing ovation, as director Wes Ball’s The Maze Runner sequel, The Scorch Trials, unravels the fate of the Gladers after they were ‘rescued’ from WCKD.

What’s it About?

The Scorch Trials wastes no time picking up where The Maze Runner left off, as Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) and his companions are brought to a medical safety warehouse. There they come across more immunes like themselves, revealing to them that their Glade was not one of its kind.

At the helm of this medical facility is the dubious, smooth-talking, Mr. Janson (Aidan Gillen) who assures the teens that they are all safe, and are weeks away from their brighter future. Thomas isn’t buying it, as kids are whisked off and not seen or heard from again. His conjecture is resonated by Aris (Jacob Lofland), who sneaks alongside Thomas to investigate.

When Thomas and his friends flee the facility, our worst fears are realised (at least for those who haven’t read the James Dashner novels by the same name) as the Gladers get a glimpse of the desolation that has beset what is left of the Flare-infected world.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Boom! I'm outta here- oh okay more to go.

Boom! I’m outta here- oh okay more to go.

Immediately after picking up where it left off, The Scorch Trials adorns a comparatively dreary pace and feel to establish the Gladers’ new sanctuary and allies. Director Wes Ball and his Maze Runner writer T.S. Nowlin apply a light brake to allow their viewers to take a good look around their course, and thrust you back with a sudden detonating gear shift.

The barren landscape of the Scorch being much vaster than the maze, Wes Ball exploits his freedom with an infatuating abundance and variety of action set-pieces filmed and edited so enthrallingly, they’ll leave you gasping for air, despite one-too-many a chase sequence. Which brings me to the one thing I wish was better – although this sequel is only 20 minutes longer than its predecessor, the Scorch feels like it’s trudged on much longer because of its one-off repetitive thrill sequences. Regardless, and although Nowlin adds little growth to our existing characters in Scorch, the plot continuously unravels with shocks, twists and obstacles that continue to propel the story forward.

New to the crew, cinematographer Gyula Pados is in perfect harmony with the entire set and VFX crew, who create haunting, hair-raising surroundings in the godforsaken wasteland, and a terrifying setup within. A special mention needs to be made for sound design, that did not need to rely on visual stimulus for even a jump scare.

Making a brief commentary on the corporatisation of the medical industry in The Maze Runner, the Scorch continues its subtextual sociopolitical commentary centered around the aforementioned affair with a more harrowing realisation. Having its work cut out for it through the success of its rival Young Adult dystopian sci-fi, The Hunger Games, the entire Maze trilogy looks set to take a course of its own, parallel to the success of its counterpart.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Dylan O'Brien - The Maze Runner 2 (II)

How are we gonna get out of this?

Dylan O’Brien’s full and physical commitment to Thomas in The Maze Runner won him plenty of praise, and in The Scorch Trials he is no less devoted to the teen whose instinct it is to break out of any cage he is confined in, never leaving a friend behind, always careful whom he trusts, and having seen and experienced so much loss that his eyes have forgotten how it feels to be at peace.

His companions, Newt (Thomas Brodie-Sangster) and Minho (Ki Hong Lee), adored as they always were, were not as prominent with their contribution to the sequence of events in Scorch as they were in the Maze, and that sees them being missed as they take the back seat in our minds. Don’t get me wrong, though – this does not mean there isn’t much of them to see!

From the moment she arrived at the Glade, Teresa has been a running mystery, and that allure is maintained by Kaya Scodelario through key moments in the Scorch. But she won’t be the only damsel for long, as she is joined by Rosa Salazar, who also appeared in yet another dystopian sci-fi young adult film sequel, Insurgent, with her Brenda, the youngest of a group of Cranks that the Gladers meet while out in the scorch. She is second-in-command to Jorge, portrayed by the veteran TV sensation Giancarlo Esposito (famously known for playing Gus Fring in Breaking Bad), as the duo add value to the handful of new characters Thomas and his friends meet.

Barry Pepper from Saving Private Ryan and The Conjuring‘s Lili Taylor add to the multi-talented cast with their Vince and Mary respectively, the former a straightforward and sincere man who will do everything he can to get the immunes to safety, and the latter a motherly figure whose warmth brings relief to the kids who have had to endure much more.

You often save the best for last, and that is why both Patricia Clarkson and Aidan Giller are being mentioned in the end for putting up a performance that will make you want to heave your fist at the pair. Appearing only in the end of the first film, Clarkson’s Ava Paige has more runtime in the Scorch, revealing her to be a stout and astute shrew, and just as questionable in integrity as Giller’s shady, bootlicking Mr. Janson.

Worth it?

“I’m tired of running,” says Thomas at one point. And that is the moment you realise, you’re actually tired too! (Involuntarily holding your breath for so long can be quite exhausting!) Which is testament to the effectiveness of the anticipation, and execution of the adrenaline rush in The Scorch Trials. Packed with a talented cast (and good-looking, which is a bonus!), some tightly edited close-calls, jaw-dropping shocks and break-neck action, you will not need any caffeine to keep your eyes wide open through it all. So don’t sip, don’t crunch, and don’t breathe too loud. Don’t breathe at all.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Dylan O’Brien
Kaya Scodelario
Thomas Brodie-Sangster
Dexter Darden
Ki Hong Lee

Written by

T. S. Nowlin
James Dashner

Directed by

Wes Ball



What to Expect

Crunching popcorns, slurping sodas, the one-off (or more frequent) ring of a phone, faint hissing whispers, a cry from a child here or there, a heaving sigh, and at least one kick in the back of your seat; sounds familiar, right? That’s your typical cinema experience in any movie theatre for any movie in the world, whether it’s your most boring dumb-laugh comedy to the most extravagantly charged superhero flick. But for the first time in my decades of cinema-going, I was seized by a movie experience (second only to the experience of its predecessor), where a deafening silence had encompassed the theatre for the entire runtime. A silence louder than a standing ovation, as director Wes Ball’s The Maze Runner sequel, The Scorch Trials, unravels the fate of the Gladers after they were ‘rescued’ from WCKD.

What’s it About?

The Scorch Trials wastes no time picking up where The Maze Runner left off, as Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) and his companions are brought to a medical safety warehouse. There they come across more immunes like themselves, revealing to them that their Glade was not one of its kind.

At the helm of this medical facility is the dubious, smooth-talking, Mr. Janson (Aidan Gillen) who assures the teens that they are all safe, and are weeks away from their brighter future. Thomas isn’t buying it, as kids are whisked off and not seen or heard from again. His conjecture is resonated by Aris (Jacob Lofland), who sneaks alongside Thomas to investigate.

When Thomas and his friends flee the facility, our worst fears are realised (at least for those who haven’t read the James Dashner novels by the same name) as the Gladers get a glimpse of the desolation that has beset what is left of the Flare-infected world.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Boom! I'm outta here- oh okay more to go.

Boom! I’m outta here- oh okay more to go.

Immediately after picking up where it left off, The Scorch Trials adorns a comparatively dreary pace and feel to establish the Gladers’ new sanctuary and allies. Director Wes Ball and his Maze Runner writer T.S. Nowlin apply a light brake to allow their viewers to take a good look around their course, and thrust you back with a sudden detonating gear shift.

The barren landscape of the Scorch being much vaster than the maze, Wes Ball exploits his freedom with an infatuating abundance and variety of action set-pieces filmed and edited so enthrallingly, they’ll leave you gasping for air, despite one-too-many a chase sequence. Which brings me to the one thing I wish was better – although this sequel is only 20 minutes longer than its predecessor, the Scorch feels like it’s trudged on much longer because of its one-off repetitive thrill sequences. Regardless, and although Nowlin adds little growth to our existing characters in Scorch, the plot continuously unravels with shocks, twists and obstacles that continue to propel the story forward.

New to the crew, cinematographer Gyula Pados is in perfect harmony with the entire set and VFX crew, who create haunting, hair-raising surroundings in the godforsaken wasteland, and a terrifying setup within. A special mention needs to be made for sound design, that did not need to rely on visual stimulus for even a jump scare.

Making a brief commentary on the corporatisation of the medical industry in The Maze Runner, the Scorch continues its subtextual sociopolitical commentary centered around the aforementioned affair with a more harrowing realisation. Having its work cut out for it through the success of its rival Young Adult dystopian sci-fi, The Hunger Games, the entire Maze trilogy looks set to take a course of its own, parallel to the success of its counterpart.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Dylan O'Brien - The Maze Runner 2 (II)

How are we gonna get out of this?

Dylan O’Brien’s full and physical commitment to Thomas in The Maze Runner won him plenty of praise, and in The Scorch Trials he is no less devoted to the teen whose instinct it is to break out of any cage he is confined in, never leaving a friend behind, always careful whom he trusts, and having seen and experienced so much loss that his eyes have forgotten how it feels to be at peace.

His companions, Newt (Thomas Brodie-Sangster) and Minho (Ki Hong Lee), adored as they always were, were not as prominent with their contribution to the sequence of events in Scorch as they were in the Maze, and that sees them being missed as they take the back seat in our minds. Don’t get me wrong, though – this does not mean there isn’t much of them to see!

From the moment she arrived at the Glade, Teresa has been a running mystery, and that allure is maintained by Kaya Scodelario through key moments in the Scorch. But she won’t be the only damsel for long, as she is joined by Rosa Salazar, who also appeared in yet another dystopian sci-fi young adult film sequel, Insurgent, with her Brenda, the youngest of a group of Cranks that the Gladers meet while out in the scorch. She is second-in-command to Jorge, portrayed by the veteran TV sensation Giancarlo Esposito (famously known for playing Gus Fring in Breaking Bad), as the duo add value to the handful of new characters Thomas and his friends meet.

Barry Pepper from Saving Private Ryan and The Conjuring‘s Lili Taylor add to the multi-talented cast with their Vince and Mary respectively, the former a straightforward and sincere man who will do everything he can to get the immunes to safety, and the latter a motherly figure whose warmth brings relief to the kids who have had to endure much more.

You often save the best for last, and that is why both Patricia Clarkson and Aidan Giller are being mentioned in the end for putting up a performance that will make you want to heave your fist at the pair. Appearing only in the end of the first film, Clarkson’s Ava Paige has more runtime in the Scorch, revealing her to be a stout and astute shrew, and just as questionable in integrity as Giller’s shady, bootlicking Mr. Janson.

Worth it?

“I’m tired of running,” says Thomas at one point. And that is the moment you realise, you’re actually tired too! (Involuntarily holding your breath for so long can be quite exhausting!) Which is testament to the effectiveness of the anticipation, and execution of the adrenaline rush in The Scorch Trials. Packed with a talented cast (and good-looking, which is a bonus!), some tightly edited close-calls, jaw-dropping shocks and break-neck action, you will not need any caffeine to keep your eyes wide open through it all. So don’t sip, don’t crunch, and don’t breathe too loud. Don’t breathe at all.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Dylan O’Brien
Kaya Scodelario
Thomas Brodie-Sangster
Director  Wes Ball
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

Barren Landscapes and Sinister Somethings

Barren Landscapes and Sinister Somethings

Crunching popcorns, slurping sodas, the one-off (or more frequent) ring of a phone, faint hissing whispers, a cry from a child here or there, a heaving sigh, and at least one kick in the back of your seat; sounds familiar, right? That’s your typical cinema experience in any movie theatre for any movie in the world, whether it’s your most boring dumb-laugh comedy to the most extravagantly charged superhero flick. But for the first time in my decades of cinema-going, I was seized by a movie experience (second only to the experience of its predecessor), where a deafening silence had encompassed the theatre for the entire runtime. A silence louder than a standing ovation, as director Wes Ball’s The Maze Runner sequel, The Scorch Trials, unravels the fate of the Gladers after they were ‘rescued’ from WCKD.

What’s it About?

The Scorch Trials wastes no time picking up where The Maze Runner left off, as Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) and his companions are brought to a medical safety warehouse. There they come across more immunes like themselves, revealing to them that their Glade was not one of its kind.

At the helm of this medical facility is the dubious, smooth-talking, Mr. Janson (Aidan Gillen) who assures the teens that they are all safe, and are weeks away from their brighter future. Thomas isn’t buying it, as kids are whisked off and not seen or heard from again. His conjecture is resonated by Aris (Jacob Lofland), who sneaks alongside Thomas to investigate.

When Thomas and his friends flee the facility, our worst fears are realised (at least for those who haven’t read the James Dashner novels by the same name) as the Gladers get a glimpse of the desolation that has beset what is left of the Flare-infected world.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Boom! I'm outta here- oh okay more to go.

Boom! I’m outta here- oh okay more to go.

Immediately after picking up where it left off, The Scorch Trials adorns a comparatively dreary pace and feel to establish the Gladers’ new sanctuary and allies. Director Wes Ball and his Maze Runner writer T.S. Nowlin apply a light brake to allow their viewers to take a good look around their course, and thrust you back with a sudden detonating gear shift.

The barren landscape of the Scorch being much vaster than the maze, Wes Ball exploits his freedom with an infatuating abundance and variety of action set-pieces filmed and edited so enthrallingly, they’ll leave you gasping for air, despite one-too-many a chase sequence. Which brings me to the one thing I wish was better – although this sequel is only 20 minutes longer than its predecessor, the Scorch feels like it’s trudged on much longer because of its one-off repetitive thrill sequences. Regardless, and although Nowlin adds little growth to our existing characters in Scorch, the plot continuously unravels with shocks, twists and obstacles that continue to propel the story forward.

New to the crew, cinematographer Gyula Pados is in perfect harmony with the entire set and VFX crew, who create haunting, hair-raising surroundings in the godforsaken wasteland, and a terrifying setup within. A special mention needs to be made for sound design, that did not need to rely on visual stimulus for even a jump scare.

Making a brief commentary on the corporatisation of the medical industry in The Maze Runner, the Scorch continues its subtextual sociopolitical commentary centered around the aforementioned affair with a more harrowing realisation. Having its work cut out for it through the success of its rival Young Adult dystopian sci-fi, The Hunger Games, the entire Maze trilogy looks set to take a course of its own, parallel to the success of its counterpart.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Dylan O'Brien - The Maze Runner 2 (II)

How are we gonna get out of this?

Dylan O’Brien’s full and physical commitment to Thomas in The Maze Runner won him plenty of praise, and in The Scorch Trials he is no less devoted to the teen whose instinct it is to break out of any cage he is confined in, never leaving a friend behind, always careful whom he trusts, and having seen and experienced so much loss that his eyes have forgotten how it feels to be at peace.

His companions, Newt (Thomas Brodie-Sangster) and Minho (Ki Hong Lee), adored as they always were, were not as prominent with their contribution to the sequence of events in Scorch as they were in the Maze, and that sees them being missed as they take the back seat in our minds. Don’t get me wrong, though – this does not mean there isn’t much of them to see!

From the moment she arrived at the Glade, Teresa has been a running mystery, and that allure is maintained by Kaya Scodelario through key moments in the Scorch. But she won’t be the only damsel for long, as she is joined by Rosa Salazar, who also appeared in yet another dystopian sci-fi young adult film sequel, Insurgent, with her Brenda, the youngest of a group of Cranks that the Gladers meet while out in the scorch. She is second-in-command to Jorge, portrayed by the veteran TV sensation Giancarlo Esposito (famously known for playing Gus Fring in Breaking Bad), as the duo add value to the handful of new characters Thomas and his friends meet.

Barry Pepper from Saving Private Ryan and The Conjuring‘s Lili Taylor add to the multi-talented cast with their Vince and Mary respectively, the former a straightforward and sincere man who will do everything he can to get the immunes to safety, and the latter a motherly figure whose warmth brings relief to the kids who have had to endure much more.

You often save the best for last, and that is why both Patricia Clarkson and Aidan Giller are being mentioned in the end for putting up a performance that will make you want to heave your fist at the pair. Appearing only in the end of the first film, Clarkson’s Ava Paige has more runtime in the Scorch, revealing her to be a stout and astute shrew, and just as questionable in integrity as Giller’s shady, bootlicking Mr. Janson.

Worth it?

“I’m tired of running,” says Thomas at one point. And that is the moment you realise, you’re actually tired too! (Involuntarily holding your breath for so long can be quite exhausting!) Which is testament to the effectiveness of the anticipation, and execution of the adrenaline rush in The Scorch Trials. Packed with a talented cast (and good-looking, which is a bonus!), some tightly edited close-calls, jaw-dropping shocks and break-neck action, you will not need any caffeine to keep your eyes wide open through it all. So don’t sip, don’t crunch, and don’t breathe too loud. Don’t breathe at all.

About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Dylan O’Brien
Kaya Scodelario
Thomas Brodie-Sangster
Director  Wes Ball
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

Crunching popcorns, slurping sodas, the one-off (or more frequent) ring of a phone, faint hissing whispers, a cry from a child here or there, a heaving sigh, and at least one kick in the back of your seat; sounds familiar, right? That’s your typical cinema experience in any movie theatre for any movie in the world, whether it’s your most boring dumb-laugh comedy to the most extravagantly charged superhero flick. But for the first time in my decades of cinema-going, I was seized by a movie experience (second only to the experience of its predecessor), where a deafening silence had encompassed the theatre for the entire runtime. A silence louder than a standing ovation, as director Wes Ball’s The Maze Runner sequel, The Scorch Trials, unravels the fate of the Gladers after they were ‘rescued’ from WCKD.

What’s it About?

The Scorch Trials wastes no time picking up where The Maze Runner left off, as Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) and his companions are brought to a medical safety warehouse. There they come across more immunes like themselves, revealing to them that their Glade was not one of its kind.

At the helm of this medical facility is the dubious, smooth-talking, Mr. Janson (Aidan Gillen) who assures the teens that they are all safe, and are weeks away from their brighter future. Thomas isn’t buying it, as kids are whisked off and not seen or heard from again. His conjecture is resonated by Aris (Jacob Lofland), who sneaks alongside Thomas to investigate.

When Thomas and his friends flee the facility, our worst fears are realised (at least for those who haven’t read the James Dashner novels by the same name) as the Gladers get a glimpse of the desolation that has beset what is left of the Flare-infected world.

Boom! I'm outta here- oh okay more to go.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Immediately after picking up where it left off, The Scorch Trials adorns a comparatively dreary pace and feel to establish the Gladers’ new sanctuary and allies. Director Wes Ball and his Maze Runner writer T.S. Nowlin apply a light brake to allow their viewers to take a good look around their course, and thrust you back with a sudden detonating gear shift.

The barren landscape of the Scorch being much vaster than the maze, Wes Ball exploits his freedom with an infatuating abundance and variety of action set-pieces filmed and edited so enthrallingly, they’ll leave you gasping for air, despite one-too-many a chase sequence. Which brings me to the one thing I wish was better – although this sequel is only 20 minutes longer than its predecessor, the Scorch feels like it’s trudged on much longer because of its one-off repetitive thrill sequences. Regardless, and although Nowlin adds little growth to our existing characters in Scorch, the plot continuously unravels with shocks, twists and obstacles that continue to propel the story forward.

New to the crew, cinematographer Gyula Pados is in perfect harmony with the entire set and VFX crew, who create haunting, hair-raising surroundings in the godforsaken wasteland, and a terrifying setup within. A special mention needs to be made for sound design, that did not need to rely on visual stimulus for even a jump scare.

Making a brief commentary on the corporatisation of the medical industry in The Maze Runner, the Scorch continues its subtextual sociopolitical commentary centered around the aforementioned affair with a more harrowing realisation. Having its work cut out for it through the success of its rival Young Adult dystopian sci-fi, The Hunger Games, the entire Maze trilogy looks set to take a course of its own, parallel to the success of its counterpart.

How are we gonna get out of here?

To Perform or Not to Perform

Dylan O’Brien’s full and physical commitment to Thomas in The Maze Runner won him plenty of praise, and in The Scorch Trials he is no less devoted to the teen whose instinct it is to break out of any cage he is confined in, never leaving a friend behind, always careful whom he trusts, and having seen and experienced so much loss that his eyes have forgotten how it feels to be at peace.

His companions, Newt (Thomas Brodie-Sangster) and Minho (Ki Hong Lee), adored as they always were, were not as prominent with their contribution to the sequence of events in Scorch as they were in the Maze, and that sees them being missed as they take the back seat in our minds. Don’t get me wrong, though – this does not mean there isn’t much of them to see!

From the moment she arrived at the Glade, Teresa has been a running mystery, and that allure is maintained by Kaya Scodelario through key moments in the Scorch. But she won’t be the only damsel for long, as she is joined by Rosa Salazar, who also appeared in yet another dystopian sci-fi young adult film sequel, Insurgent, with her Brenda, the youngest of a group of Cranks that the Gladers meet while out in the scorch. She is second-in-command to Jorge, portrayed by the veteran TV sensation Giancarlo Esposito (famously known for playing Gus Fring in Breaking Bad), as the duo add value to the handful of new characters Thomas and his friends meet.

Barry Pepper from Saving Private Ryan and The Conjuring‘s Lili Taylor add to the multi-talented cast with their Vince and Mary respectively, the former a straightforward and sincere man who will do everything he can to get the immunes to safety, and the latter a motherly figure whose warmth brings relief to the kids who have had to endure much more.

You often save the best for last, and that is why both Patricia Clarkson and Aidan Giller are being mentioned in the end for putting up a performance that will make you want to heave your fist at the pair. Appearing only in the end of the first film, Clarkson’s Ava Paige has more runtime in the Scorch, revealing her to be a stout and astute shrew, and just as questionable in integrity as Giller’s shady, bootlicking Mr. Janson.

Worth it?

“I’m tired of running,” says Thomas at one point. And that is the moment you realise, you’re actually tired too! (Involuntarily holding your breath for so long can be quite exhausting!) Which is testament to the effectiveness of the anticipation, and execution of the adrenaline rush in The Scorch Trials. Packed with a talented cast (and good-looking, which is a bonus!), some tightly edited close-calls, jaw-dropping shocks and break-neck action, you will not need any caffeine to keep your eyes wide open through it all. So don’t sip, don’t crunch, and don’t breathe too loud. Don’t breathe at all.

About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

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