Miss You Already

It’s strictly alright already!


Miss You Already

  • It’s strictly alright already!

Miss You Already

  • It’s strictly alright already!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Drew Barrymore
Toni Collette
Dominic Cooper
Paddy Considine
Jaqueline Bisset

Written by

Morwenna Banks

Directed by

Catherine Hardwicke



coming up

What to Expect

So we’ve all thought of Catherine Hardwicke as the one who started it all; the one who began what’s possibly the most disappointing franchise in the history of mankind.

Yeah, we’re talking about Twilight.

But here’s the deal: there’s still a lot to expect from a director like her. Because, despite what the laypeople who’ve watched the first part of the aforementioned franchise – or Red Riding Hood – would justifiably think of her, she is a talent. And rightfully so, especially for a person who began her career with the impressive Thirteen. Sure, it had hiccups, but nobody can deny the truckload of talent that was shown to the world with the release of the movie.

Which is where Miss You Already comes into the picture. The trailer does give its audience a big red warning of it being dangerously fraught with a bunch of cliches, but somewhere, one still expects sparks of brilliance.

What’s it About?

Two friends who grew up together now lead starkly different lives. While Milly has become the perfect mother, the perfect wife and an amazing success story, her friend Jess lives on a boat with her boyfriend, trying desperately to have a baby. When Milly gets diagnosed with breast cancer, however, things change.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

#FRENZ4LYF

I think if there’s anything that totally wins the film, it’s the edit decisions made by Phillip J. Bartell. From match cuts to parallel editing, there’s a certain surprising storytelling confidence that Bartell shows on screen, and it works a charm.

Written by Morwenna Banks (based off her own radio play Goodbye), the movie, however,  resorts to a ton of cliches. Hardwicke directs the film with a lot of fervor and movement, which mostly saves the film. The affable chemistry between Collette and Barrymore kills it, and more than occasionally, you’re either smiling or tearing up, if only a bit.

The real surprise, however, comes with simply how unpredictably they’ve set the film up till the end. Usually, with a ton of films where one of the primary characters is riddled with a life-altering illness, one finds a strict pattern of how the character both grows and disintegrates emotionally and physically respectively. Here, despite everything, viewers never really know if she’s going to die or survive the battle against cancer. Yes, there’s an inkling of knowledge about the film’s conclusion, but the twists and turns of Collette’s character’s life manage to keep you distracted till the very end.

There’s quite a bit to praise here. You’ve got a wonderful score by Harry Gregson-Williams and Elliot Davis’s splendid cinematography that manages to complement the tone of the film quite well. Put the film together, and you’re unfortunately faced with what a schmaltzy mess it more than occasionally becomes. When the act of pulling viewers’ heartstrings becomes painfully obvious, the movie ends up losing a lot of emotional leverage.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Reformed to be perfect

Let’s be quite honest here and just state that Tonic Collette and Drew Barrymore take the screen by fire. They’re extremely comfortable onscreen and have no qualms of making every conversation look as grounded as possible. From the little things to the major incidents, there’s a natural tendency of the characters to lean on each other, and what the movie essentially tries to capture is helped insanely by the dynamic duo.

But let’s not forget Dominic Cooper and the solid support he lends to the movie. His rather unpredictable relationship with Collette is exemplified only by his terrific performance of the hapless husband. Paddy Considine is quite alright, but most of his time is spent consistently whining or being unpleasantly surprised throughout, which makes his character redundant and prop-like quicker than you might think. Tyson Ritter has an interesting cameo, which is justifiably ended on an abrupt note, although the time he spends on screen shows terrific confidence. Jaqueline Bisset is alright, and the others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Let me go out on a limb here and say this: the movie is passable, and more than occasionally, quite enjoyable. There are times when the movie is slow, and there are other times where you’re seeing things you’ve seen a thousand times before. The unpredictable character arc of Collette’s Milly, and some fresh narrative and edit decisions do make you sit up and notice, however. And if nothing else, there’s always going to be the admission that Miss You Already is infinitely better than Twilight or Red Riding Hood. So, win win!

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Drew Barrymore
Toni Collette
Dominic Cooper
Paddy Considine
Jaqueline Bisset

Written by

Morwenna Banks

Directed by

Catherine Hardwicke



What to Expect

So we’ve all thought of Catherine Hardwicke as the one who started it all; the one who began what’s possibly the most disappointing franchise in the history of mankind.

Yeah, we’re talking about Twilight.

But here’s the deal: there’s still a lot to expect from a director like her. Because, despite what the laypeople who’ve watched the first part of the aforementioned franchise – or Red Riding Hood – would justifiably think of her, she is a talent. And rightfully so, especially for a person who began her career with the impressive Thirteen. Sure, it had hiccups, but nobody can deny the truckload of talent that was shown to the world with the release of the movie.

Which is where Miss You Already comes into the picture. The trailer does give its audience a big red warning of it being dangerously fraught with a bunch of cliches, but somewhere, one still expects sparks of brilliance.

What’s it About?

Two friends who grew up together now lead starkly different lives. While Milly has become the perfect mother, the perfect wife and an amazing success story, her friend Jess lives on a boat with her boyfriend, trying desperately to have a baby. When Milly gets diagnosed with breast cancer, however, things change.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

#FRENZ4LYF

I think if there’s anything that totally wins the film, it’s the edit decisions made by Phillip J. Bartell. From match cuts to parallel editing, there’s a certain surprising storytelling confidence that Bartell shows on screen, and it works a charm.

Written by Morwenna Banks (based off her own radio play Goodbye), the movie, however,  resorts to a ton of cliches. Hardwicke directs the film with a lot of fervor and movement, which mostly saves the film. The affable chemistry between Collette and Barrymore kills it, and more than occasionally, you’re either smiling or tearing up, if only a bit.

The real surprise, however, comes with simply how unpredictably they’ve set the film up till the end. Usually, with a ton of films where one of the primary characters is riddled with a life-altering illness, one finds a strict pattern of how the character both grows and disintegrates emotionally and physically respectively. Here, despite everything, viewers never really know if she’s going to die or survive the battle against cancer. Yes, there’s an inkling of knowledge about the film’s conclusion, but the twists and turns of Collette’s character’s life manage to keep you distracted till the very end.

There’s quite a bit to praise here. You’ve got a wonderful score by Harry Gregson-Williams and Elliot Davis’s splendid cinematography that manages to complement the tone of the film quite well. Put the film together, and you’re unfortunately faced with what a schmaltzy mess it more than occasionally becomes. When the act of pulling viewers’ heartstrings becomes painfully obvious, the movie ends up losing a lot of emotional leverage.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Reformed to be perfect

Let’s be quite honest here and just state that Tonic Collette and Drew Barrymore take the screen by fire. They’re extremely comfortable onscreen and have no qualms of making every conversation look as grounded as possible. From the little things to the major incidents, there’s a natural tendency of the characters to lean on each other, and what the movie essentially tries to capture is helped insanely by the dynamic duo.

But let’s not forget Dominic Cooper and the solid support he lends to the movie. His rather unpredictable relationship with Collette is exemplified only by his terrific performance of the hapless husband. Paddy Considine is quite alright, but most of his time is spent consistently whining or being unpleasantly surprised throughout, which makes his character redundant and prop-like quicker than you might think. Tyson Ritter has an interesting cameo, which is justifiably ended on an abrupt note, although the time he spends on screen shows terrific confidence. Jaqueline Bisset is alright, and the others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Let me go out on a limb here and say this: the movie is passable, and more than occasionally, quite enjoyable. There are times when the movie is slow, and there are other times where you’re seeing things you’ve seen a thousand times before. The unpredictable character arc of Collette’s Milly, and some fresh narrative and edit decisions do make you sit up and notice, however. And if nothing else, there’s always going to be the admission that Miss You Already is infinitely better than Twilight or Red Riding Hood. So, win win!

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Drew Barrymore
Toni Collette
Dominic Cooper
Director Catherine Hardwicke
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

It's a poster already!

It’s a poster already!

So we’ve all thought of Catherine Hardwicke as the one who started it all; the one who began what’s possibly the most disappointing franchise in the history of mankind.

Yeah, we’re talking about Twilight.

But here’s the deal: there’s still a lot to expect from a director like her. Because, despite what the laypeople who’ve watched the first part of the aforementioned franchise – or Red Riding Hood – would justifiably think of her, she is a talent. And rightfully so, especially for a person who began her career with the impressive Thirteen. Sure, it had hiccups, but nobody can deny the truckload of talent that was shown to the world with the release of the movie.

Which is where Miss You Already comes into the picture. The trailer does give its audience a big red warning of it being dangerously fraught with a bunch of cliches, but somewhere, one still expects sparks of brilliance.

What’s it About?

Two friends who grew up together now lead starkly different lives. While Milly has become the perfect mother, the perfect wife and an amazing success story, her friend Jess lives on a boat with her boyfriend, trying desperately to have a baby. When Milly gets diagnosed with breast cancer, however, things change.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

#FRENZ4LYF

I think if there’s anything that totally wins the film, it’s the edit decisions made by Phillip J. Bartell. From match cuts to parallel editing, there’s a certain surprising storytelling confidence that Bartell shows on screen, and it works a charm.

Written by Morwenna Banks (based off her own radio play Goodbye), the movie, however,  resorts to a ton of cliches. Hardwicke directs the film with a lot of fervor and movement, which mostly saves the film. The affable chemistry between Collette and Barrymore kills it, and more than occasionally, you’re either smiling or tearing up, if only a bit.

The real surprise, however, comes with simply how unpredictably they’ve set the film up till the end. Usually, with a ton of films where one of the primary characters is riddled with a life-altering illness, one finds a strict pattern of how the character both grows and disintegrates emotionally and physically respectively. Here, despite everything, viewers never really know if she’s going to die or survive the battle against cancer. Yes, there’s an inkling of knowledge about the film’s conclusion, but the twists and turns of Collette’s character’s life manage to keep you distracted till the very end.

There’s quite a bit to praise here. You’ve got a wonderful score by Harry Gregson-Williams and Elliot Davis’s splendid cinematography that manages to complement the tone of the film quite well. Put the film together, and you’re unfortunately faced with what a schmaltzy mess it more than occasionally becomes. When the act of pulling viewers’ heartstrings becomes painfully obvious, the movie ends up losing a lot of emotional leverage.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Reformed to be perfect

Let’s be quite honest here and just state that Tonic Collette and Drew Barrymore take the screen by fire. They’re extremely comfortable onscreen and have no qualms of making every conversation look as grounded as possible. From the little things to the major incidents, there’s a natural tendency of the characters to lean on each other, and what the movie essentially tries to capture is helped insanely by the dynamic duo.

But let’s not forget Dominic Cooper and the solid support he lends to the movie. His rather unpredictable relationship with Collette is exemplified only by his terrific performance of the hapless husband. Paddy Considine is quite alright, but most of his time is spent consistently whining or being unpleasantly surprised throughout, which makes his character redundant and prop-like quicker than you might think. Tyson Ritter has an interesting cameo, which is justifiably ended on an abrupt note, although the time he spends on screen shows terrific confidence. Jaqueline Bisset is alright, and the others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Let me go out on a limb here and say this: the movie is passable, and more than occasionally, quite enjoyable. There are times when the movie is slow, and there are other times where you’re seeing things you’ve seen a thousand times before. The unpredictable character arc of Collette’s Milly, and some fresh narrative and edit decisions do make you sit up and notice, however. And if nothing else, there’s always going to be the admission that Miss You Already is infinitely better than Twilight or Red Riding Hood. So, win win!

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Drew Barrymore
Toni Collette
Dominic Cooper
Director Catherine Hardwicke
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

So we’ve all thought of Catherine Hardwicke as the one who started it all; the one who began what’s possibly the most disappointing franchise in the history of mankind.

Yeah, we’re talking about Twilight.

But here’s the deal: there’s still a lot to expect from a director like her. Because, despite what the laypeople who’ve watched the first part of the aforementioned franchise – or Red Riding Hood – would justifiably think of her, she is a talent. And rightfully so, especially for a person who began her career with the impressive Thirteen. Sure, it had hiccups, but nobody can deny the truckload of talent that was shown to the world with the release of the movie.

Which is where Miss You Already comes into the picture. The trailer does give its audience a big red warning of it being dangerously fraught with a bunch of cliches, but somewhere, one still expects sparks of brilliance.

What’s it About?

Two friends who grew up together now lead starkly different lives. While Milly has become the perfect mother, the perfect wife and an amazing success story, her friend Jess lives on a boat with her boyfriend, trying desperately to have a baby. When Milly gets diagnosed with breast cancer, however, things change.

#FRENZ4LYF

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

I think if there’s anything that totally wins the film, it’s the edit decisions made by Phillip J. Bartell. From match cuts to parallel editing, there’s a certain surprising storytelling confidence that Bartell shows on screen, and it works a charm.

Written by Morwenna Banks (based off her own radio play Goodbye), the movie, however,  resorts to a ton of cliches. Hardwicke directs the film with a lot of fervor and movement, which mostly saves the film. The affable chemistry between Collette and Barrymore kills it, and more than occasionally, you’re either smiling or tearing up, if only a bit.

The real surprise, however, comes with simply how unpredictably they’ve set the film up till the end. Usually, with a ton of films where one of the primary characters is riddled with a life-altering illness, one finds a strict pattern of how the character both grows and disintegrates emotionally and physically respectively. Here, despite everything, viewers never really know if she’s going to die or survive the battle against cancer. Yes, there’s an inkling of knowledge about the film’s conclusion, but the twists and turns of Collette’s character’s life manage to keep you distracted till the very end.

There’s quite a bit to praise here. You’ve got a wonderful score by Harry Gregson-Williams and Elliot Davis’s splendid cinematography that manages to complement the tone of the film quite well. Put the film together, and you’re unfortunately faced with what a schmaltzy mess it more than occasionally becomes. When the act of pulling viewers’ heartstrings becomes painfully obvious, the movie ends up losing a lot of emotional leverage.

Reformed to be perfect

To Perform or Not to Perform

Let’s be quite honest here and just state that Tonic Collette and Drew Barrymore take the screen by fire. They’re extremely comfortable onscreen and have no qualms of making every conversation look as grounded as possible. From the little things to the major incidents, there’s a natural tendency of the characters to lean on each other, and what the movie essentially tries to capture is helped insanely by the dynamic duo.

But let’s not forget Dominic Cooper and the solid support he lends to the movie. His rather unpredictable relationship with Collette is exemplified only by his terrific performance of the hapless husband. Paddy Considine is quite alright, but most of his time is spent consistently whining or being unpleasantly surprised throughout, which makes his character redundant and prop-like quicker than you might think. Tyson Ritter has an interesting cameo, which is justifiably ended on an abrupt note, although the time he spends on screen shows terrific confidence. Jaqueline Bisset is alright, and the others are pretty good.

Worth it?

Let me go out on a limb here and say this: the movie is passable, and more than occasionally, quite enjoyable. There are times when the movie is slow, and there are other times where you’re seeing things you’ve seen a thousand times before. The unpredictable character arc of Collette’s Milly, and some fresh narrative and edit decisions do make you sit up and notice, however. And if nothing else, there’s always going to be the admission that Miss You Already is infinitely better than Twilight or Red Riding Hood. So, win win!

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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