Moor

A symbolic work of art


Moor

  • A symbolic work of art

Moor

  • A symbolic work of art


Rated

N/A

Starring

Hameed Sheikh
Shaz Khan
Shabbir Rana
Abdul Qadir
Soniya Hussain

Written by

Jami
Ali Nazira
Riaz-ur-Rehman Saghar
Eman Syed

Directed by

Jami



coming up

What to Expect

In 2007, Shoaib Mansoor gave the Pakistani Cinema Industry its big international breakthrough – rather, revival – with his political drama film Khuda Kay Liye, then one of Pakistan’s highest grossing films of all time. Since then, critically acclaimed works like Bol, Zinda Bhaag, Dukhtar et al have all emerged making strong sociopolitical commentaries and addressing grave concerns embedded deep within the Pakistani society.

Jamshed Raza, alias Jami, a big name in the media industry, adds to the rapidly growing list with his latest feature film, Moor, bolstering the niche in Pakistan’s cinematic commentary and art with his own unique style.

What’s it About?

Waheed Ullah Khan (Hameed Sheikh), a station master at the once flourishing Khost Railway Station, is haunted by a tragedy from his past, and recently being widowed has further added to his angst. His brother, Zaheer (Shabbir Rana), has joined arms with a local mafia that makes a fortune at the expense of the now perishing railway tracks, led by Lalu (Sultan Hussain). The two persistently pressure Waheed to stick to his word and sell the station and tracks under his care to them. However, this puts Waheed in a moral dilemma, as it was against the last wishes of his deceased wife, Palwasha (Samiya Mumtaz), who was a firm believer in making an honest living, convinced that the land kept her family embedded with its heritage and ancestry.

Meanwhile, Waheed’s son, Ehsaan (Shaz Khan) left his hometown of Khost for Karachi when he was much younger, in hopes of securing a bright and prosperous future in the metropolis. The city, however, had been anything but kind to him, and over the years he has succumbed to the temptation that is easy, but ludicrous, money with a forgery business, rendering his mother’s preaching of strong moral values and integrity completely fruitless.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Land. Principles. Family

Land. Principles. Family

Jami is no stranger to art. The music videos and TVC’s with which he has established himself in the past have all been laden with abstractness. And thanks to his intricate focus, Moor is rich with symbolism. One would presume the film is a drama centering around its titular character, Moor – which translates to Mother – and her endeavors to ensure her family is kept rooted together. But for those that have an eye for all things allusive, there is more than just the one Mother at the helm here – a birthmother, and the motherland – both the identity of a man, and yet the collateral of his greed. And this is just one of many symbols ingrained within the narrative.

Penning down his own screenplay, Jami treats the complexity of his father and son duo with great care, mastering the emotional turmoils of two humans battling their inner demons as he maneuvers his characters like a virtuoso puppeteer.

Already boasting a promising soundtrack from the internationally acclaimed pop rock band, Strings, Moor reaps the benefit of breathtaking mountainous landscapes of the Baluchistan province, coupled with the stark contrast of the concrete jungle that is Karachi, and Jami ensured his DOP, Farhan Hafeez, deserved noteworthy praise for his work even at the premiere. The editing team, in addition, deserves a notable mention as the film is primed with flashbacks intercut so craftily that they will rope you right in to the epitome of your protagonists’ torment. Because of this, however, some may say they were unable to grasp the gist of Moor, but you can think of it as a narrative told in a fashion very similar to Hollywood titan, Christopher Nolan – lose focus, and you’ve lost the plot.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Integrity. Morality. Money.

Integrity. Morality. Money.

There is no question that Moor enjoys a stellar cast, with TV veterans leading the line-up. Steering it all forward is Hameed Sheikh himself, adopting everything Baluchi imaginable about a man who has never set foot outside his remote town in a manner so convincing, your eyes well up from being overwhelmed when his Waheed stares in awe at everything he has never seen nor imagined outside of Khost.

Shabbir Rana, playing Waheed’s brother, and Sultan Hussain, playing the mafia ring leader do not disappoint in their respective roles as the sleazy old men emotionally abusing a human’s despair for their own profit. Abdul Qadir, the most experienced actor on set, is the sparkly glimmer of sunshine you’ll find escape through the corner of a snowcapped mountain, as his character Baggoo, Waheed’s loyal confidante, provides comic relief at impeccably timed cues.

Samiya Mumtaz, a highly seasoned actress, leaves no leaf unturned with her portrayal of the Mother – or Moor – and although, for the sake of the narrative, she exists in the film only as a memory, by means of flashbacks, you will find her character leave a very deep imprint throughout.

Coming to the fresher talent, the dashing US-based heartthrob, Shaz Khan, is simply spectacular. A young man in his twenties, ambitions shattered, grieving his mother and struggling to balance morality and survival, his Ehsaan is a time-bomb waiting to go off in a manner with which Shaz will drive you to tears. Next to him is Sonia Hussain with her Amber, Ehsan’s friend whom his father frowns on, being a man belonging to a conventional school of thoughts, under the presumption that there is a romance waiting to happen. Luckily there is none, and Amber remains in the “friend zone,” saving the film from anything cheesy.

Worth it?

The verdict: YES!

Before Ehsan leaves the town for Karachi, his mother does not have anything to offer him except for her pearls of wisdom with a watch: “You only have time. Take care of it.”

Brandishing a star cast, and in the reins of a man who clearly has an eye for seeing a special story to tell in everything, Moor may well be another film making a social commentary, but it does so without any cliched preaching or propaganda, and it is your time that is certainly worth investing in this official entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 88th Academy Awards.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

N/A

Starring

Hameed Sheikh
Shaz Khan
Shabbir Rana
Abdul Qadir
Soniya Hussain

Written by

Jami
Ali Nazira
Riaz-ur-Rehman Saghar
Eman Syed

Directed by

Jami



What to Expect

In 2007, Shoaib Mansoor gave the Pakistani Cinema Industry its big international breakthrough – rather, revival – with his political drama film Khuda Kay Liye, then one of Pakistan’s highest grossing films of all time. Since then, critically acclaimed works like Bol, Zinda Bhaag, Dukhtar et al have all emerged making strong sociopolitical commentaries and addressing grave concerns embedded deep within the Pakistani society.

Jamshed Raza, alias Jami, a big name in the media industry, adds to the rapidly growing list with his latest feature film, Moor, bolstering the niche in Pakistan’s cinematic commentary and art with his own unique style.

What’s it About?

Waheed Ullah Khan (Hameed Sheikh), a station master at the once flourishing Khost Railway Station, is haunted by a tragedy from his past, and recently being widowed has further added to his angst. His brother, Zaheer (Shabbir Rana), has joined arms with a local mafia that makes a fortune at the expense of the now perishing railway tracks, led by Lalu (Sultan Hussain). The two persistently pressure Waheed to stick to his word and sell the station and tracks under his care to them. However, this puts Waheed in a moral dilemma, as it was against the last wishes of his deceased wife, Palwasha (Samiya Mumtaz), who was a firm believer in making an honest living, convinced that the land kept her family embedded with its heritage and ancestry.

Meanwhile, Waheed’s son, Ehsaan (Shaz Khan) left his hometown of Khost for Karachi when he was much younger, in hopes of securing a bright and prosperous future in the metropolis. The city, however, had been anything but kind to him, and over the years he has succumbed to the temptation that is easy, but ludicrous, money with a forgery business, rendering his mother’s preaching of strong moral values and integrity completely fruitless.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Land. Principles. Family

Land. Principles. Family

Jami is no stranger to art. The music videos and TVC’s with which he has established himself in the past have all been laden with abstractness. And thanks to his intricate focus, Moor is rich with symbolism. One would presume the film is a drama centering around its titular character, Moor – which translates to Mother – and her endeavors to ensure her family is kept rooted together. But for those that have an eye for all things allusive, there is more than just the one Mother at the helm here – a birthmother, and the motherland – both the identity of a man, and yet the collateral of his greed. And this is just one of many symbols ingrained within the narrative.

Penning down his own screenplay, Jami treats the complexity of his father and son duo with great care, mastering the emotional turmoils of two humans battling their inner demons as he maneuvers his characters like a virtuoso puppeteer.

Already boasting a promising soundtrack from the internationally acclaimed pop rock band, Strings, Moor reaps the benefit of breathtaking mountainous landscapes of the Baluchistan province, coupled with the stark contrast of the concrete jungle that is Karachi, and Jami ensured his DOP, Farhan Hafeez, deserved noteworthy praise for his work even at the premiere. The editing team, in addition, deserves a notable mention as the film is primed with flashbacks intercut so craftily that they will rope you right in to the epitome of your protagonists’ torment. Because of this, however, some may say they were unable to grasp the gist of Moor, but you can think of it as a narrative told in a fashion very similar to Hollywood titan, Christopher Nolan – lose focus, and you’ve lost the plot.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Integrity. Morality. Money.

Integrity. Morality. Money.

There is no question that Moor enjoys a stellar cast, with TV veterans leading the line-up. Steering it all forward is Hameed Sheikh himself, adopting everything Baluchi imaginable about a man who has never set foot outside his remote town in a manner so convincing, your eyes well up from being overwhelmed when his Waheed stares in awe at everything he has never seen nor imagined outside of Khost.

Shabbir Rana, playing Waheed’s brother, and Sultan Hussain, playing the mafia ring leader do not disappoint in their respective roles as the sleazy old men emotionally abusing a human’s despair for their own profit. Abdul Qadir, the most experienced actor on set, is the sparkly glimmer of sunshine you’ll find escape through the corner of a snowcapped mountain, as his character Baggoo, Waheed’s loyal confidante, provides comic relief at impeccably timed cues.

Samiya Mumtaz, a highly seasoned actress, leaves no leaf unturned with her portrayal of the Mother – or Moor – and although, for the sake of the narrative, she exists in the film only as a memory, by means of flashbacks, you will find her character leave a very deep imprint throughout.

Coming to the fresher talent, the dashing US-based heartthrob, Shaz Khan, is simply spectacular. A young man in his twenties, ambitions shattered, grieving his mother and struggling to balance morality and survival, his Ehsaan is a time-bomb waiting to go off in a manner with which Shaz will drive you to tears. Next to him is Sonia Hussain with her Amber, Ehsan’s friend whom his father frowns on, being a man belonging to a conventional school of thoughts, under the presumption that there is a romance waiting to happen. Luckily there is none, and Amber remains in the “friend zone,” saving the film from anything cheesy.

Worth it?

The verdict: YES!

Before Ehsan leaves the town for Karachi, his mother does not have anything to offer him except for her pearls of wisdom with a watch: “You only have time. Take care of it.”

Brandishing a star cast, and in the reins of a man who clearly has an eye for seeing a special story to tell in everything, Moor may well be another film making a social commentary, but it does so without any cliched preaching or propaganda, and it is your time that is certainly worth investing in this official entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 88th Academy Awards.

Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!
About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Hameed Sheikh
Shaz Khan
Abdul Qadir
Director Jami
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

Wide Cold Nothingness

Wide Cold Nothingness

In 2007, Shoaib Mansoor gave the Pakistani Cinema Industry its big international breakthrough – rather, revival – with his political drama film Khuda Kay Liye, then one of Pakistan’s highest grossing films of all time. Since then, critically acclaimed works like Bol, Zinda Bhaag, Dukhtar et al have all emerged making strong sociopolitical commentaries and addressing grave concerns embedded deep within the Pakistani society.

Jamshed Raza, alias Jami, a big name in the media industry, adds to the rapidly growing list with his latest feature film, Moor, bolstering the niche in Pakistan’s cinematic commentary and art with his own unique style.

What’s it About?

Waheed Ullah Khan (Hameed Sheikh), a station master at the once flourishing Khost Railway Station, is haunted by a tragedy from his past, and recently being widowed has further added to his angst. His brother, Zaheer (Shabbir Rana), has joined arms with a local mafia that makes a fortune at the expense of the now perishing railway tracks, led by Lalu (Sultan Hussain). The two persistently pressure Waheed to stick to his word and sell the station and tracks under his care to them. However, this puts Waheed in a moral dilemma, as it was against the last wishes of his deceased wife, Palwasha (Samiya Mumtaz), who was a firm believer in making an honest living, convinced that the land kept her family embedded with its heritage and ancestry.

Meanwhile, Waheed’s son, Ehsaan (Shaz Khan) left his hometown of Khost for Karachi when he was much younger, in hopes of securing a bright and prosperous future in the metropolis. The city, however, had been anything but kind to him, and over the years he has succumbed to the temptation that is easy, but ludicrous, money with a forgery business, rendering his mother’s preaching of strong moral values and integrity completely fruitless.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Land. Principles. Family

Land. Principles. Family

Jami is no stranger to art. The music videos and TVC’s with which he has established himself in the past have all been laden with abstractness. And thanks to his intricate focus, Moor is rich with symbolism. One would presume the film is a drama centering around its titular character, Moor – which translates to Mother – and her endeavors to ensure her family is kept rooted together. But for those that have an eye for all things allusive, there is more than just the one Mother at the helm here – a birthmother, and the motherland – both the identity of a man, and yet the collateral of his greed. And this is just one of many symbols ingrained within the narrative.

Penning down his own screenplay, Jami treats the complexity of his father and son duo with great care, mastering the emotional turmoils of two humans battling their inner demons as he maneuvers his characters like a virtuoso puppeteer.

Already boasting a promising soundtrack from the internationally acclaimed pop rock band, Strings, Moor reaps the benefit of breathtaking mountainous landscapes of the Baluchistan province, coupled with the stark contrast of the concrete jungle that is Karachi, and Jami ensured his DOP, Farhan Hafeez, deserved noteworthy praise for his work even at the premiere. The editing team, in addition, deserves a notable mention as the film is primed with flashbacks intercut so craftily that they will rope you right in to the epitome of your protagonists’ torment. Because of this, however, some may say they were unable to grasp the gist of Moor, but you can think of it as a narrative told in a fashion very similar to Hollywood titan, Christopher Nolan – lose focus, and you’ve lost the plot.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Integrity. Morality. Money.

Integrity. Morality. Money.

There is no question that Moor enjoys a stellar cast, with TV veterans leading the line-up. Steering it all forward is Hameed Sheikh himself, adopting everything Baluchi imaginable about a man who has never set foot outside his remote town in a manner so convincing, your eyes well up from being overwhelmed when his Waheed stares in awe at everything he has never seen nor imagined outside of Khost.

Shabbir Rana, playing Waheed’s brother, and Sultan Hussain, playing the mafia ring leader do not disappoint in their respective roles as the sleazy old men emotionally abusing a human’s despair for their own profit. Abdul Qadir, the most experienced actor on set, is the sparkly glimmer of sunshine you’ll find escape through the corner of a snowcapped mountain, as his character Baggoo, Waheed’s loyal confidante, provides comic relief at impeccably timed cues.

Samiya Mumtaz, a highly seasoned actress, leaves no leaf unturned with her portrayal of the Mother – or Moor – and although, for the sake of the narrative, she exists in the film only as a memory, by means of flashbacks, you will find her character leave a very deep imprint throughout.

Coming to the fresher talent, the dashing US-based heartthrob, Shaz Khan, is simply spectacular. A young man in his twenties, ambitions shattered, grieving his mother and struggling to balance morality and survival, his Ehsaan is a time-bomb waiting to go off in a manner with which Shaz will drive you to tears. Next to him is Sonia Hussain with her Amber, Ehsan’s friend whom his father frowns on, being a man belonging to a conventional school of thoughts, under the presumption that there is a romance waiting to happen. Luckily there is none, and Amber remains in the “friend zone,” saving the film from anything cheesy.

Worth it?

The verdict: YES!

Before Ehsan leaves the town for Karachi, his mother does not have anything to offer him except for her pearls of wisdom with a watch: “You only have time. Take care of it.”

Brandishing a star cast, and in the reins of a man who clearly has an eye for seeing a special story to tell in everything, Moor may well be another film making a social commentary, but it does so without any cliched preaching or propaganda, and it is your time that is certainly worth investing in this official entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 88th Academy Awards.

About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Hameed Sheikh
Shaz Khan
Abdul Qadir
Director Jami
Consensus: 4 Stars
Impressive!

What to Expect

In 2007, Shoaib Mansoor gave the Pakistani Cinema Industry its big international breakthrough – rather, revival – with his political drama film Khuda Kay Liye, then one of Pakistan’s highest grossing films of all time. Since then, critically acclaimed works like Bol, Zinda Bhaag, Dukhtar et al have all emerged making strong sociopolitical commentaries and addressing grave concerns embedded deep within the Pakistani society.

Jamshed Raza, alias Jami, a big name in the media industry, adds to the rapidly growing list with his latest feature film, Moor, bolstering the niche in Pakistan’s cinematic commentary and art with his own unique style.

What’s it About?

Waheed Ullah Khan (Hameed Sheikh), a station master at the once flourishing Khost Railway Station, is haunted by a tragedy from his past, and recently being widowed has further added to his angst. His brother, Zaheer (Shabbir Rana), has joined arms with a local mafia that makes a fortune at the expense of the now perishing railway tracks, led by Lalu (Sultan Hussain). The two persistently pressure Waheed to stick to his word and sell the station and tracks under his care to them. However, this puts Waheed in a moral dilemma, as it was against the last wishes of his deceased wife, Palwasha (Samiya Mumtaz), who was a firm believer in making an honest living, convinced that the land kept her family embedded with its heritage and ancestry.

Meanwhile, Waheed’s son, Ehsaan (Shaz Khan) left his hometown of Khost for Karachi when he was much younger, in hopes of securing a bright and prosperous future in the metropolis. The city, however, had been anything but kind to him, and over the years he has succumbed to the temptation that is easy, but ludicrous, money with a forgery business, rendering his mother’s preaching of strong moral values and integrity completely fruitless.

Land. Principles. Family

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Jami is no stranger to art. The music videos and TVC’s with which he has established himself in the past have all been laden with abstractness. And thanks to his intricate focus, Moor is rich with symbolism. One would presume the film is a drama centering around its titular character, Moor – which translates to Mother – and her endeavors to ensure her family is kept rooted together. But for those that have an eye for all things allusive, there is more than just the one Mother at the helm here – a birthmother, and the motherland – both the identity of a man, and yet the collateral of his greed. And this is just one of many symbols ingrained within the narrative.

Penning down his own screenplay, Jami treats the complexity of his father and son duo with great care, mastering the emotional turmoils of two humans battling their inner demons as he maneuvers his characters like a virtuoso puppeteer.

Already boasting a promising soundtrack from the internationally acclaimed pop rock band, Strings, Moor reaps the benefit of breathtaking mountainous landscapes of the Baluchistan province, coupled with the stark contrast of the concrete jungle that is Karachi, and Jami ensured his DOP, Farhan Hafeez, deserved noteworthy praise for his work even at the premiere. The editing team, in addition, deserves a notable mention as the film is primed with flashbacks intercut so craftily that they will rope you right in to the epitome of your protagonists’ torment. Because of this, however, some may say they were unable to grasp the gist of Moor, but you can think of it as a narrative told in a fashion very similar to Hollywood titan, Christopher Nolan – lose focus, and you’ve lost the plot.

Integrity. Morality. Money.

To Perform or Not to Perform

There is no question that Moor enjoys a stellar cast, with TV veterans leading the line-up. Steering it all forward is Hameed Sheikh himself, adopting everything Baluchi imaginable about a man who has never set foot outside his remote town in a manner so convincing, your eyes well up from being overwhelmed when his Waheed stares in awe at everything he has never seen nor imagined outside of Khost.

Shabbir Rana, playing Waheed’s brother, and Sultan Hussain, playing the mafia ring leader do not disappoint in their respective roles as the sleazy old men emotionally abusing a human’s despair for their own profit. Abdul Qadir, the most experienced actor on set, is the sparkly glimmer of sunshine you’ll find escape through the corner of a snowcapped mountain, as his character Baggoo, Waheed’s loyal confidante, provides comic relief at impeccably timed cues.

Samiya Mumtaz, a highly seasoned actress, leaves no leaf unturned with her portrayal of the Mother – or Moor – and although, for the sake of the narrative, she exists in the film only as a memory, by means of flashbacks, you will find her character leave a very deep imprint throughout.

Coming to the fresher talent, the dashing US-based heartthrob, Shaz Khan, is simply spectacular. A young man in his twenties, ambitions shattered, grieving his mother and struggling to balance morality and survival, his Ehsaan is a time-bomb waiting to go off in a manner with which Shaz will drive you to tears. Next to him is Sonia Hussain with her Amber, Ehsan’s friend whom his father frowns on, being a man belonging to a conventional school of thoughts, under the presumption that there is a romance waiting to happen. Luckily there is none, and Amber remains in the “friend zone,” saving the film from anything cheesy.

Worth it?

The verdict: YES!

Before Ehsan leaves the town for Karachi, his mother does not have anything to offer him except for her pearls of wisdom with a watch: “You only have time. Take care of it.”

Brandishing a star cast, and in the reins of a man who clearly has an eye for seeing a special story to tell in everything, Moor may well be another film making a social commentary, but it does so without any cliched preaching or propaganda, and it is your time that is certainly worth investing in this official entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 88th Academy Awards.

About the Author

Dania Syed

A Grammar Nazi but not a prude. A filmmaker but not a film buff. This one likes to think their opinion is worth something. In a nutshell, El Magnifico!

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