Mr. Holmes

Much unhurried fun to be had!


Mr. Holmes

  • Much unhurried fun to be had!

Mr. Holmes

  • Much unhurried fun to be had!


Rated

PG

Starring

Ian McKellen
Laura Linney
Milo Parker
Hiroyuki Sanada

Written by

Jeffrey Hatcher
Mitch Cullin (novel)

Directed by

Bill Condon


What to Expect

Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed character in movies with more than 70 actors playing him in over 200 films till date. Not that Sherlock ever had any dip in his popularity, but a renewed interest in the character is credited to BBC’s more contemporary adaptation, and Benedict Cumberbatch’s rather eccentric and hugely entertaining portrayal.

The latest in the series of fine actors playing the Bohemian detective is Sir Ian McKellen in director Bill Condon’s (The Fifth Estate) Mr. Holmes, based on Mitch Cullin’s novel A Slight Trick of the Mind. Fans and purists of the literary character are more than aware about the adventures of the (albeit largely armchair) detective as written by his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and all the stories and their twists are well known all around. It is something of a welcome change to feature a story about Holmes that is not widely known and yet operates in the era that Sherlock is known to originally. Also, we’ve seen Sherlock mostly at his peak both in his powers and age, considering there has been a movie about his younger self too, but to feature Sherlock as almost a frail old man and in retirement is novel. And wouldn’t it be delightful to see the sleuth struggle a bit?

What’s it About?

It’s the year 1947. Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) is 93 with a failing memory, and has retired in a remote Sussex farmhouse with his housekeeper Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney) and her son Roger (Milo Parker). Also, since Sherlock is fond of beekeeping, he has an apiary in the farmhouse too. Freshly returned from visiting Japan at the invite of a mysterious admirer, Sherlock now is trying to recall fragments of his last case that made him quit 35 years ago as he doesn’t like the way his associate and friend Dr. John Watson fictionalized it. Gently prodded by Roger to remember the details, he eventually develops a paternal liking for him. The boy in turn discovers a newfound love for beekeeping and gets ambitious about a better status in society than just being working-class.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Who am I now?

Who am I now?

As aforementioned, the film’s strength is the novel approach in showing a frail and struggling Holmes. It has less to do with Sherlock’s sharp deductive inference abilities and more to do with keeping up with his own former self while trying to find answers for his present self. It is an insightful character study at the fag end of the once bohemian detective’s life, who is now constantly plagued with questions of morality, humanity, love and loss. The literary character is known to keep his distance emotionally, not just from his clients and associates, but also from the occasional friend John Watson. It is therefore quite interesting to see a side of Holmes that is getting open to the idea of companionship in some form or the other. Let’s just say, at the end of things, as you would expect anyone to, Sherlock is getting humane and is now also thinking of the consequence that a resolution brings sometimes, even if the sole aim at the beginning was to get an answer to the mystery; Sherlock now thinks about the answer and its effect too.

The set up of the film though may have been marked as 1947, but the minimalistic set up of an isolated farmhouse makes it more universal and timeless in its approach (as I suspect could be the intention). The distractions are few, and the focus is entirely on the drama and the players involved. As the narrative moves back and forth with Sherlock’s effort to remember the details of his last case, the present marks changes in Sherlock’s entire being as a result of those revelations to his own self. It is akin to Sherlock having a conversation with his former self and while being told the incidents as they happened, having epiphany for his present self; the effect is lyrical.

A movie involving Holmes is bound to have expectation of a thriller embedded somewhere in it, and in that regard Mr. Holmes is a bit of a let down, considering you were looking for the thrill more than anything else. There is a mystery alright, but the nature of the mystery is metaphysical in its manifestation and not just a twist in the tale. The movie should be seen as a fresh perspective on the oft told and acted Sherlock Holmes persona. A great way of looking at it would be to watch it as a companion piece to any of the Sherlock Holmes movies; even more effective if it is something of a thriller. I can think of the Guy Ritchie adaptation as a stark contrast to the leisurely pace of Mr. Holmes. I would like to believe that the drama would be more appreciated when, after having seen the thrill and adventure, you sit back to watch an old Sherlock Holmes on the path of self-discovery.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Letting go

Letting go

Sir Ian McKellen (X-Men: Days of Future Past) is a delight – and bit of a surprise – in his portrayal of the character. You’d like to wonder if there’s anything different an actor can do now, what with so many renditions of the same character, and that is where the writing and the performance make all the difference. I’d like to digress a bit and give an example of Sherlock, the BBC mini series; the first unaired pilot of the show had Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock as a happy-go-lucky character with the entire episode shot in well lit tones and a cheerful appearance. The reworking of the same story with a slightly wicked Sherlock and darker appearance both in the form of set design, lighting and mood has a marvelous effect, to great admiration from all. In that regard, writers Mitch Cullin and Jeffrey Hatcher give a new perspective and vantage point to the character and Sir Ian McKellen dives into it with a lot of vigor. He plays two versions of the old Sherlock, the first being one that is 58 and is still nimble on his feet with his supreme ego and one who prides himself on always finding the solution. The second is 93 years old; frail, slow, with a failing memory and one who is full of doubts and questions. Sir McKellen plays both parts brilliantly. In a scene where Sherlock admits his failure on not being able to provide the closure and comfort that should have been supreme, his ego from his former self makes a quick interjection, voicing out that technically, he had already solved the case. This struggle of the two Sherlocks is a thing to watch. Among other principal characters Laura Linney (The Savages) as the housekeeper Mrs. Munro is remarkably restrained and keeps the torment of working for the unappreciative Sherlock just under the surface. Also, her insecurity at the growing fondness between the old man and his son is brought out by her fine body language and often unspoken expressions. Milo Parker (Robot Overlords) as Roger Munro pleasantly surprised me with his range of performance. In a scene where he thunders away at his mother is such a delight and displays much promise from this kid.

Worth it?

This fresh perspective on the much loved, celebrated, performed and analyzed character is something to be deliberated on, and thankfully, the unhurried pace of the film gives you ample time, reason, and – might I add – indulgence in the form of well-written and performed drama to do that. Sherlock moves out of 221B Baker Street and his move to the countryside is a trail that you should join him on; there’s much fun to be had.

Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG

Starring

Ian McKellen
Laura Linney
Milo Parker
Hiroyuki Sanada

Written by

Jeffrey Hatcher
Mitch Cullin (novel)

Directed by

Bill Condon


What to Expect

Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed character in movies with more than 70 actors playing him in over 200 films till date. Not that Sherlock ever had any dip in his popularity, but a renewed interest in the character is credited to BBC’s more contemporary adaptation, and Benedict Cumberbatch’s rather eccentric and hugely entertaining portrayal.

The latest in the series of fine actors playing the Bohemian detective is Sir Ian McKellen in director Bill Condon’s (The Fifth Estate) Mr. Holmes, based on Mitch Cullin’s novel A Slight Trick of the Mind. Fans and purists of the literary character are more than aware about the adventures of the (albeit largely armchair) detective as written by his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and all the stories and their twists are well known all around. It is something of a welcome change to feature a story about Holmes that is not widely known and yet operates in the era that Sherlock is known to originally. Also, we’ve seen Sherlock mostly at his peak both in his powers and age, considering there has been a movie about his younger self too, but to feature Sherlock as almost a frail old man and in retirement is novel. And wouldn’t it be delightful to see the sleuth struggle a bit?

What’s it About?

It’s the year 1947. Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) is 93 with a failing memory, and has retired in a remote Sussex farmhouse with his housekeeper Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney) and her son Roger (Milo Parker). Also, since Sherlock is fond of beekeeping, he has an apiary in the farmhouse too. Freshly returned from visiting Japan at the invite of a mysterious admirer, Sherlock now is trying to recall fragments of his last case that made him quit 35 years ago as he doesn’t like the way his associate and friend Dr. John Watson fictionalized it. Gently prodded by Roger to remember the details, he eventually develops a paternal liking for him. The boy in turn discovers a newfound love for beekeeping and gets ambitious about a better status in society than just being working-class.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Who am I now?

Who am I now?

As aforementioned, the film’s strength is the novel approach in showing a frail and struggling Holmes. It has less to do with Sherlock’s sharp deductive inference abilities and more to do with keeping up with his own former self while trying to find answers for his present self. It is an insightful character study at the fag end of the once bohemian detective’s life, who is now constantly plagued with questions of morality, humanity, love and loss. The literary character is known to keep his distance emotionally, not just from his clients and associates, but also from the occasional friend John Watson. It is therefore quite interesting to see a side of Holmes that is getting open to the idea of companionship in some form or the other. Let’s just say, at the end of things, as you would expect anyone to, Sherlock is getting humane and is now also thinking of the consequence that a resolution brings sometimes, even if the sole aim at the beginning was to get an answer to the mystery; Sherlock now thinks about the answer and its effect too.

The set up of the film though may have been marked as 1947, but the minimalistic set up of an isolated farmhouse makes it more universal and timeless in its approach (as I suspect could be the intention). The distractions are few, and the focus is entirely on the drama and the players involved. As the narrative moves back and forth with Sherlock’s effort to remember the details of his last case, the present marks changes in Sherlock’s entire being as a result of those revelations to his own self. It is akin to Sherlock having a conversation with his former self and while being told the incidents as they happened, having epiphany for his present self; the effect is lyrical.

A movie involving Holmes is bound to have expectation of a thriller embedded somewhere in it, and in that regard Mr. Holmes is a bit of a let down, considering you were looking for the thrill more than anything else. There is a mystery alright, but the nature of the mystery is metaphysical in its manifestation and not just a twist in the tale. The movie should be seen as a fresh perspective on the oft told and acted Sherlock Holmes persona. A great way of looking at it would be to watch it as a companion piece to any of the Sherlock Holmes movies; even more effective if it is something of a thriller. I can think of the Guy Ritchie adaptation as a stark contrast to the leisurely pace of Mr. Holmes. I would like to believe that the drama would be more appreciated when, after having seen the thrill and adventure, you sit back to watch an old Sherlock Holmes on the path of self-discovery.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Letting go

Letting go

Sir Ian McKellen (X-Men: Days of Future Past) is a delight – and bit of a surprise – in his portrayal of the character. You’d like to wonder if there’s anything different an actor can do now, what with so many renditions of the same character, and that is where the writing and the performance make all the difference. I’d like to digress a bit and give an example of Sherlock, the BBC mini series; the first unaired pilot of the show had Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock as a happy-go-lucky character with the entire episode shot in well lit tones and a cheerful appearance. The reworking of the same story with a slightly wicked Sherlock and darker appearance both in the form of set design, lighting and mood has a marvelous effect, to great admiration from all. In that regard, writers Mitch Cullin and Jeffrey Hatcher give a new perspective and vantage point to the character and Sir Ian McKellen dives into it with a lot of vigor. He plays two versions of the old Sherlock, the first being one that is 58 and is still nimble on his feet with his supreme ego and one who prides himself on always finding the solution. The second is 93 years old; frail, slow, with a failing memory and one who is full of doubts and questions. Sir McKellen plays both parts brilliantly. In a scene where Sherlock admits his failure on not being able to provide the closure and comfort that should have been supreme, his ego from his former self makes a quick interjection, voicing out that technically, he had already solved the case. This struggle of the two Sherlocks is a thing to watch. Among other principal characters Laura Linney (The Savages) as the housekeeper Mrs. Munro is remarkably restrained and keeps the torment of working for the unappreciative Sherlock just under the surface. Also, her insecurity at the growing fondness between the old man and his son is brought out by her fine body language and often unspoken expressions. Milo Parker (Robot Overlords) as Roger Munro pleasantly surprised me with his range of performance. In a scene where he thunders away at his mother is such a delight and displays much promise from this kid.

Worth it?

This fresh perspective on the much loved, celebrated, performed and analyzed character is something to be deliberated on, and thankfully, the unhurried pace of the film gives you ample time, reason, and – might I add – indulgence in the form of well-written and performed drama to do that. Sherlock moves out of 221B Baker Street and his move to the countryside is a trail that you should join him on; there’s much fun to be had.

Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Ian McKellen
Laura Linney
Milo Parker
Director Bill Condon
Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!

What to Expect

The man, the mystery, the past...

The man, the mystery, the past…

Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed character in movies with more than 70 actors playing him in over 200 films till date. Not that Sherlock ever had any dip in his popularity, but a renewed interest in the character is credited to BBC’s more contemporary adaptation, and Benedict Cumberbatch’s rather eccentric and hugely entertaining portrayal.

The latest in the series of fine actors playing the Bohemian detective is Sir Ian McKellen in director Bill Condon’s (The Fifth Estate) Mr. Holmes, based on Mitch Cullin’s novel A Slight Trick of the Mind. Fans and purists of the literary character are more than aware about the adventures of the (albeit largely armchair) detective as written by his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and all the stories and their twists are well known all around. It is something of a welcome change to feature a story about Holmes that is not widely known and yet operates in the era that Sherlock is known to originally. Also, we’ve seen Sherlock mostly at his peak both in his powers and age, considering there has been a movie about his younger self too, but to feature Sherlock as almost a frail old man and in retirement is novel. And wouldn’t it be delightful to see the sleuth struggle a bit?

What’s it About?

It’s the year 1947. Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) is 93 with a failing memory, and has retired in a remote Sussex farmhouse with his housekeeper Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney) and her son Roger (Milo Parker). Also, since Sherlock is fond of beekeeping, he has an apiary in the farmhouse too. Freshly returned from visiting Japan at the invite of a mysterious admirer, Sherlock now is trying to recall fragments of his last case that made him quit 35 years ago as he doesn’t like the way his associate and friend Dr. John Watson fictionalized it. Gently prodded by Roger to remember the details, he eventually develops a paternal liking for him. The boy in turn discovers a newfound love for beekeeping and gets ambitious about a better status in society than just being working-class.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Who am I now?

Who am I now?

As aforementioned, the film’s strength is the novel approach in showing a frail and struggling Holmes. It has less to do with Sherlock’s sharp deductive inference abilities and more to do with keeping up with his own former self while trying to find answers for his present self. It is an insightful character study at the fag end of the once bohemian detective’s life, who is now constantly plagued with questions of morality, humanity, love and loss. The literary character is known to keep his distance emotionally, not just from his clients and associates, but also from the occasional friend John Watson. It is therefore quite interesting to see a side of Holmes that is getting open to the idea of companionship in some form or the other. Let’s just say, at the end of things, as you would expect anyone to, Sherlock is getting humane and is now also thinking of the consequence that a resolution brings sometimes, even if the sole aim at the beginning was to get an answer to the mystery; Sherlock now thinks about the answer and its effect too.

The set up of the film though may have been marked as 1947, but the minimalistic set up of an isolated farmhouse makes it more universal and timeless in its approach (as I suspect could be the intention). The distractions are few, and the focus is entirely on the drama and the players involved. As the narrative moves back and forth with Sherlock’s effort to remember the details of his last case, the present marks changes in Sherlock’s entire being as a result of those revelations to his own self. It is akin to Sherlock having a conversation with his former self and while being told the incidents as they happened, having epiphany for his present self; the effect is lyrical.

A movie involving Holmes is bound to have expectation of a thriller embedded somewhere in it, and in that regard Mr. Holmes is a bit of a let down, considering you were looking for the thrill more than anything else. There is a mystery alright, but the nature of the mystery is metaphysical in its manifestation and not just a twist in the tale. The movie should be seen as a fresh perspective on the oft told and acted Sherlock Holmes persona. A great way of looking at it would be to watch it as a companion piece to any of the Sherlock Holmes movies; even more effective if it is something of a thriller. I can think of the Guy Ritchie adaptation as a stark contrast to the leisurely pace of Mr. Holmes. I would like to believe that the drama would be more appreciated when, after having seen the thrill and adventure, you sit back to watch an old Sherlock Holmes on the path of self-discovery.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Letting go

Letting go

Sir Ian McKellen (X-Men: Days of Future Past) is a delight – and bit of a surprise – in his portrayal of the character. You’d like to wonder if there’s anything different an actor can do now, what with so many renditions of the same character, and that is where the writing and the performance make all the difference. I’d like to digress a bit and give an example of Sherlock, the BBC mini series; the first unaired pilot of the show had Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock as a happy-go-lucky character with the entire episode shot in well lit tones and a cheerful appearance. The reworking of the same story with a slightly wicked Sherlock and darker appearance both in the form of set design, lighting and mood has a marvelous effect, to great admiration from all. In that regard, writers Mitch Cullin and Jeffrey Hatcher give a new perspective and vantage point to the character and Sir Ian McKellen dives into it with a lot of vigor. He plays two versions of the old Sherlock, the first being one that is 58 and is still nimble on his feet with his supreme ego and one who prides himself on always finding the solution. The second is 93 years old; frail, slow, with a failing memory and one who is full of doubts and questions. Sir McKellen plays both parts brilliantly. In a scene where Sherlock admits his failure on not being able to provide the closure and comfort that should have been supreme, his ego from his former self makes a quick interjection, voicing out that technically, he had already solved the case. This struggle of the two Sherlocks is a thing to watch. Among other principal characters Laura Linney (The Savages) as the housekeeper Mrs. Munro is remarkably restrained and keeps the torment of working for the unappreciative Sherlock just under the surface. Also, her insecurity at the growing fondness between the old man and his son is brought out by her fine body language and often unspoken expressions. Milo Parker (Robot Overlords) as Roger Munro pleasantly surprised me with his range of performance. In a scene where he thunders away at his mother is such a delight and displays much promise from this kid.

Worth it?

This fresh perspective on the much loved, celebrated, performed and analyzed character is something to be deliberated on, and thankfully, the unhurried pace of the film gives you ample time, reason, and – might I add – indulgence in the form of well-written and performed drama to do that. Sherlock moves out of 221B Baker Street and his move to the countryside is a trail that you should join him on; there’s much fun to be had.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Ian McKellen
Laura Linney
Milo Parker
Director Bill Condon
Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!

What to Expect

Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed character in movies with more than 70 actors playing him in over 200 films till date. Not that Sherlock ever had any dip in his popularity, but a renewed interest in the character is credited to BBC’s more contemporary adaptation, and Benedict Cumberbatch’s rather eccentric and hugely entertaining portrayal.

The latest in the series of fine actors playing the Bohemian detective is Sir Ian McKellen in director Bill Condon’s (The Fifth Estate) Mr. Holmes, based on Mitch Cullin’s novel A Slight Trick of the Mind. Fans and purists of the literary character are more than aware about the adventures of the (albeit largely armchair) detective as written by his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and all the stories and their twists are well known all around. It is something of a welcome change to feature a story about Holmes that is not widely known and yet operates in the era that Sherlock is known to originally. Also, we’ve seen Sherlock mostly at his peak both in his powers and age, considering there has been a movie about his younger self too, but to feature Sherlock as almost a frail old man and in retirement is novel. And wouldn’t it be delightful to see the sleuth struggle a bit?

What’s it About?

It’s the year 1947. Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) is 93 with a failing memory, and has retired in a remote Sussex farmhouse with his housekeeper Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney) and her son Roger (Milo Parker). Also, since Sherlock is fond of beekeeping, he has an apiary in the farmhouse too. Freshly returned from visiting Japan at the invite of a mysterious admirer, Sherlock now is trying to recall fragments of his last case that made him quit 35 years ago as he doesn’t like the way his associate and friend Dr. John Watson fictionalized it. Gently prodded by Roger to remember the details, he eventually develops a paternal liking for him. The boy in turn discovers a newfound love for beekeeping and gets ambitious about a better status in society than just being working-class.

Who am I now?

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

As aforementioned, the film’s strength is the novel approach in showing a frail and struggling Holmes. It has less to do with Sherlock’s sharp deductive inference abilities and more to do with keeping up with his own former self while trying to find answers for his present self. It is an insightful character study at the fag end of the once bohemian detective’s life, who is now constantly plagued with questions of morality, humanity, love and loss. The literary character is known to keep his distance emotionally, not just from his clients and associates, but also from the occasional friend John Watson. It is therefore quite interesting to see a side of Holmes that is getting open to the idea of companionship in some form or the other. Let’s just say, at the end of things, as you would expect anyone to, Sherlock is getting humane and is now also thinking of the consequence that a resolution brings sometimes, even if the sole aim at the beginning was to get an answer to the mystery; Sherlock now thinks about the answer and its effect too.

The set up of the film though may have been marked as 1947, but the minimalistic set up of an isolated farmhouse makes it more universal and timeless in its approach (as I suspect could be the intention). The distractions are few, and the focus is entirely on the drama and the players involved. As the narrative moves back and forth with Sherlock’s effort to remember the details of his last case, the present marks changes in Sherlock’s entire being as a result of those revelations to his own self. It is akin to Sherlock having a conversation with his former self and while being told the incidents as they happened, having epiphany for his present self; the effect is lyrical.

A movie involving Holmes is bound to have expectation of a thriller embedded somewhere in it, and in that regard Mr. Holmes is a bit of a let down, considering you were looking for the thrill more than anything else. There is a mystery alright, but the nature of the mystery is metaphysical in its manifestation and not just a twist in the tale. The movie should be seen as a fresh perspective on the oft told and acted Sherlock Holmes persona. A great way of looking at it would be to watch it as a companion piece to any of the Sherlock Holmes movies; even more effective if it is something of a thriller. I can think of the Guy Ritchie adaptation as a stark contrast to the leisurely pace of Mr. Holmes. I would like to believe that the drama would be more appreciated when, after having seen the thrill and adventure, you sit back to watch an old Sherlock Holmes on the path of self-discovery.

The mastermind and his match

To Perform or Not to Perform

Sir Ian McKellen (X-Men: Days of Future Past) is a delight – and bit of a surprise – in his portrayal of the character. You’d like to wonder if there’s anything different an actor can do now, what with so many renditions of the same character, and that is where the writing and the performance make all the difference. I’d like to digress a bit and give an example of Sherlock, the BBC mini series; the first unaired pilot of the show had Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock as a happy-go-lucky character with the entire episode shot in well lit tones and a cheerful appearance. The reworking of the same story with a slightly wicked Sherlock and darker appearance both in the form of set design, lighting and mood has a marvelous effect, to great admiration from all. In that regard, writers Mitch Cullin and Jeffrey Hatcher give a new perspective and vantage point to the character and Sir Ian McKellen dives into it with a lot of vigor. He plays two versions of the old Sherlock, the first being one that is 58 and is still nimble on his feet with his supreme ego and one who prides himself on always finding the solution. The second is 93 years old; frail, slow, with a failing memory and one who is full of doubts and questions. Sir McKellen plays both parts brilliantly. In a scene where Sherlock admits his failure on not being able to provide the closure and comfort that should have been supreme, his ego from his former self makes a quick interjection, voicing out that technically, he had already solved the case. This struggle of the two Sherlocks is a thing to watch. Among other principal characters Laura Linney (The Savages) as the housekeeper Mrs. Munro is remarkably restrained and keeps the torment of working for the unappreciative Sherlock just under the surface. Also, her insecurity at the growing fondness between the old man and his son is brought out by her fine body language and often unspoken expressions. Milo Parker (Robot Overlords) as Roger Munro pleasantly surprised me with his range of performance. In a scene where he thunders away at his mother is such a delight and displays much promise from this kid.

Worth it?

This fresh perspective on the much loved, celebrated, performed and analyzed character is something to be deliberated on, and thankfully, the unhurried pace of the film gives you ample time, reason, and – might I add – indulgence in the form of well-written and performed drama to do that. Sherlock moves out of 221B Baker Street and his move to the countryside is a trail that you should join him on; there’s much fun to be had.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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