THE MUMMY

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

The Universe is Dark, for a deluge of reboots have but swallowed the entire World, taking with them its many inhabitants. Stripped of their agency by the oppressive member-berry clan, humans are now under the spell of franchises past. And with the dangerous grip Queen Membress—the clan’s megalomaniac leader—has over us all, one would think the worst is behind us.

We couldn’t be more wrong.

THE MOVIE

Mummy: Impossible

If Tommy Wiseau knew better, we’d have an entire universe surrounding The Room, with an undead Johnny being a Thanos equivalent in each canon film. But here we are, instead being torn apart by multiple rapidly flourishing cinematic extensions that don’t have any end in sight. The kind of entrepreneurial and creative benchmark Marvel has successfully achieved so far is both astonishing and enviable, and it comes as absolutely no surprise that other studios would so want to follow by branching out their respective intellectual properties.

It’s why we’re now in a reality where the Dark Universe exists.

That would all be fine and dandy, except The Mummy isn’t exactly the strongest entry to the series. Alex Kurtzman’s sophomore effort as a director boasts superior vision, but can’t seem to rise under the weight of a generic action-adventure film structure. Tom Cruise (Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation) and Sofia Boutella (Star Trek Beyond) deliver excellent performances, but can only carry the burden of a derivative and inconsistent screenwriting so far. Cruise and Boutella, who essay two of the film’s biggest characters, are also cursed by their respective lackluster arcs.

[…] The Mummy feels neither complete, nor consistent.ANKIT OJHA

Fortunately, despite its crippling shortcomings, it’s not all bad. Kurtzman dexterously handles tension and urgency in the many breathless set-pieces it boasts. Armed with the fitting score of Brian Tyler (The Fate of the Furious), and cinematographer Ben Seresin’s (World War Z) keen understanding of visual storytelling, the film does manage to leave you intermittently engaged. There, unfortunately, mark the end of the silver linings.

Viewers are treated to human props in the garb of characters—there’s a doomed friend (Jake Johnson; television’s New Girl), a damsel-in-distress (Annabelle Wallis; Come and Find Me), and the rich middle-aged dude (Russell Crowe; The Nice Guys) who doubles as the film’s faux-narrator. With a narrative that unashamedly serves to secure its franchise’s future, The Mummy feels neither complete, nor consistent—and considering the plethora of writers involved, this comes as no surprise. That, among others, the likes of Christopher McQuarrie (Jack Reacher) and David Koepp (Premium Rush) are a part of this collaboration is what really disappoints, given the immense potential they otherwise boast.

OMG YAAS! TOM CRUISE IN DA HIZZOUSE!

VERDICT

Kurtzman made a promising directorial debut with People Like Us, an affectionate (if gratuitously schmaltzy) drama that managed to be consistently watchable despite its by-the-numbers treatment. The Mummy is similarly tolerable enough to warrant passive attention over the weekend, but serves to achieve no more than any other generic action-adventure summer film would. Cruise might be in cruise control, but the rest of the film paves way for a universe enveloped by doom and darkness—and for all the wrong reasons.

Watch the trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Star Rating:

Plot

An ancient princess is brought back to life, bringing with her an insatiable thirst for power and destruction.

Cast

Director

Rated

PG-13

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THE PLOT

An ancient princess is brought back to life, bringing with her an insatiable thirst for power and destruction.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

The Universe is Dark, for a deluge of reboots have but swallowed the entire World, taking with them its many inhabitants. Stripped of their agency by the oppressive member-berry clan, humans are now under the spell of franchises past. And with the dangerous grip Queen Membress—the clan’s megalomaniac leader—has over us all, one would think the worst is behind us.

We couldn’t be more wrong.

THE MOVIE

Mummy: Impossible

If Tommy Wiseau knew better, we’d have an entire universe surrounding The Room, with an undead Johnny being a Thanos equivalent in each canon film. But here we are, instead being torn apart by multiple rapidly flourishing cinematic extensions that don’t have any end in sight. The kind of entrepreneurial and creative benchmark Marvel has successfully achieved so far is both astonishing and enviable, and it comes as absolutely no surprise that other studios would so want to follow by branching out their respective intellectual properties.

It’s why we’re now in a reality where the Dark Universe exists.

That would all be fine and dandy, except The Mummy isn’t exactly the strongest entry to the series. Alex Kurtzman’s sophomore effort as a director boasts superior vision, but can’t seem to rise under the weight of a generic action-adventure film structure. Tom Cruise (Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation) and Sofia Boutella (Star Trek Beyond) deliver excellent performances, but can only carry the burden of a derivative and inconsistent screenwriting so far. Cruise and Boutella, who essay two of the film’s biggest characters, are also cursed by their respective lackluster arcs.

[…] The Mummy feels neither complete, nor consistent.ANKIT OJHA

Fortunately, despite its crippling shortcomings, it’s not all bad. Kurtzman dexterously handles tension and urgency in the many breathless set-pieces it boasts. Armed with the fitting score of Brian Tyler (The Fate of the Furious), and cinematographer Ben Seresin’s (World War Z) keen understanding of visual storytelling, the film does manage to leave you intermittently engaged. There, unfortunately, mark the end of the silver linings.

Viewers are treated to human props in the garb of characters—there’s a doomed friend (Jake Johnson; television’s New Girl), a damsel-in-distress (Annabelle Wallis; Come and Find Me), and the rich middle-aged dude (Russell Crowe; The Nice Guys) who doubles as the film’s faux-narrator. With a narrative that unashamedly serves to secure its franchise’s future, The Mummy feels neither complete, nor consistent—and considering the plethora of writers involved, this comes as no surprise. That, among others, the likes of Christopher McQuarrie (Jack Reacher) and David Koepp (Premium Rush) are a part of this collaboration is what really disappoints, given the immense potential they otherwise boast.

OMG YAAS! TOM CRUISE IN DA HIZZOUSE!

VERDICT

Kurtzman made a promising directorial debut with People Like Us, an affectionate (if gratuitously schmaltzy) drama that managed to be consistently watchable despite its by-the-numbers treatment. The Mummy is similarly tolerable enough to warrant passive attention over the weekend, but serves to achieve no more than any other generic action-adventure summer film would. Cruise might be in cruise control, but the rest of the film paves way for a universe enveloped by doom and darkness—and for all the wrong reasons.

Watch trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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