Need for Speed

Fun, but nothing new!


Need for Speed

Starring: Aaron Paul, Dominic Cooper, Imogen Poots, Michael Keaton
Directed by: Scott Waugh

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

Need for Speed

Starring: Aaron Paul, Dominic Cooper, Imogen Poots, Michael Keaton
Directed by: Scott Waugh

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!


Starring

Aaron Paul
Dominic Cooper
Imogen Poots
Michael Keaton
Kid Cudi

Written by

John Gatins
George Gatins

Directed by

Scott Waugh


What to Expect

When gaming giant Electronic Arts decided to back the publishing of the then new car culture game The Need for Speed to be released in the year 1994, they probably wouldn’t have thought there would be a movie on it, much less in the last decade even. This, especially with a franchise as The Fast and The Furious already by and large around the circuit of summer blockbusters. Who knew that Need for Speed would get its own (probable?) cinematic redemption sooner or later? Has this writer been waiting for it? Absolutely. Does he have doubts (especially considering such adaptations as Mortal KombatHitman and Max Payne)? Unfortunately, yes. Fortunately for the film, the credits consist of some very visible silver linings:

  • You’ve got John Gatins (who wrote the Robert Zemmeckis directed drama Flight) co-writing a script with his brother George;
  • You’ve got Scott Waugh, who directed the (admittedly weak-on-script-and-acting, but) technically experimental Act of Valor, coming back to the director’s seat for this one; and of course
  • There’s Badass Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), Breaking the barriers of the small screen, donning the role of the protagonist here.

Definitely a few things to watch out for, aren’t there? At the risk of repeating myself, however, wariness forms a stronger cloud, reminding the potential viewer of the dubious film adaptations of video game franchises.

What’s it About?

The story is pretty simple, actually. No frills, no complexities; just an oversimplified, predictable, cookie-cutter story. Toby Marshall (Aaron Paul) is a car mechanic in severe debt by day, and a mad race-car driver by night. By a twist of fate, he is set up and put to prison for two years. He vows revenge, both for the death of his friend and for the refusal of any claim to his innocence.

The Good, the (Breaking) Bad and the Ugly

I'm the good guy who went to jail... because I'm good.

“I’m the good guy who went to jail… because I’m good.”

Director Scott Waugh (who even serves as co-editor) takes up his fascination for gritty, grounded and realist action to see every race-to-the-finish to perfection. As we’ve already seen in his previous film Act of Valor, he knows edge-of-the-seat action movie direction pretty well, and it shows. In collaboration with the stunt team, Waugh has been able to execute some of the most thrilling car races on screen by far. As also seen in the filmmaking techniques of his former film, viewers will see the reason why: the director decided against use of any type of CGI for each of the action set-pieces of the movie, accounting for a lot of realism and practicality in its races and chases. If you’re a fan of car culture films, you’ll know that besides being highly derivative of the relatively dizzyingly popular car-culture movie franchise The Fast and the Furious, Need for Speed tilts more toward the delicious flavour of the films of yore, paying homage especially to a specific title, Bullitt, directed by Peter Yates and starring Steve McQueen. One of the reasons the Mustang is almost another character also associates itself with the makers’ fascination with Yates’ movie. The races have been well edited, what with parallel editing making for a very descriptively smooth movement in scene. What also differentiates these action set pieces from other similar ones is the background score taking a complete backseat; the silence pushing the atmospheric sound design through. Shane Hurlbut’s cinematography and his direction of camera operations make for a merger of epic proportions here. Especially of relevance here is his visual execution of the action sequences. Watch out for the famed Vertigo effect used in a host of chases from the vantage point of the driver, giving an added sense of the edge-of-the-seat speed and immersive dizziness to the viewer. All of the technical shebang is unfortunately wasted on a predictably convenient and an over-simplistically linear screenplay. The protagonist and the antagonist have little to justify themselves with in their character arcs. The dialogues are insanely poor and unimaginative and needed a lot of work. There are some redeeming and heartening moments in the film, but they’re unfortunately, close to rare and far in between.

To Perform or Not to Perform

I'm the bad guy who stayed out of jail... because I'm bad.

“I’m the bad guy who stayed out of jail… because I’m bad.”

A very intelligent decision of the makers was definitely one to choose Aaron Paul as the protagonist of the movie. He gives his all to a character that almost doesn’t deserve his dedication toward his work. Having already shown an extremely dynamic skill-set with Breaking Bad, Paul brings an added charisma and star power to his role. As also seen in some of his other films like the James Ponsoldt directed Smashed, Paul knows broodiness from ravaging emotion, and he delivers both tangents pretty well. Dominic Cooper as antagonist Dino Brewster has the swagger, the arrogance and the chutzpah required for his role, and delivers ably. He is, however, not able to play around with his role, and one can’t blame him. Imogen Poots is gorgeous, and executes her wit with charisma and confidence. Her role is unfortunately conveniently cut short. Michael Keaton in a short role is damn entertaining. Kid Cudi is basically reminiscent of Tyrese Gibson in the Fast and Furious franchise. Others are good.

Worth it?

Overall, Need for Speed is quite the watch for the highly effective edge-of-the-seat action and performances, but the script is disappointing, considering particularly the involvement of John Gatins, who has given us a well-written gem in the form of 2012’s Flight. Flaky character arcs, terribly weak dialogues and a highly convenient story graph do not help at all. Whether it manages to take on The Fast and the Furious would probably be another story altogether, but as a film, there’s certainly a whole lot better ways that it could have taken on its progression. But that’s just my opinion.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!

#ReadBuySupport

Amazon

iTunes



Starring

Aaron Paul
Dominic Cooper
Imogen Poots
Michael Keaton
Kid Cudi

Written by

John Gatins
George Gatins

Directed by

Scott Waugh


What to Expect

When gaming giant Electronic Arts decided to back the publishing of the then new car culture game The Need for Speed to be released in the year 1994, they probably wouldn’t have thought there would be a movie on it, much less in the last decade even. This, especially with a franchise as The Fast and The Furious already by and large around the circuit of summer blockbusters. Who knew that Need for Speed would get its own (probable?) cinematic redemption sooner or later? Has this writer been waiting for it? Absolutely. Does he have doubts (especially considering such adaptations as Mortal KombatHitman and Max Payne)? Unfortunately, yes. Fortunately for the film, the credits consist of some very visible silver linings:

  • You’ve got John Gatins (who wrote the Robert Zemmeckis directed drama Flight) co-writing a script with his brother George;
  • You’ve got Scott Waugh, who directed the (admittedly weak-on-script-and-acting, but) technically experimental Act of Valor, coming back to the director’s seat for this one; and of course
  • There’s Badass Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), Breaking the barriers of the small screen, donning the role of the protagonist here.

Definitely a few things to watch out for, aren’t there? At the risk of repeating myself, however, wariness forms a stronger cloud, reminding the potential viewer of the dubious film adaptations of video game franchises.

What’s it About?

The story is pretty simple, actually. No frills, no complexities; just an oversimplified, predictable, cookie-cutter story. Toby Marshall (Aaron Paul) is a car mechanic in severe debt by day, and a mad race-car driver by night. By a twist of fate, he is set up and put to prison for two years. He vows revenge, both for the death of his friend and for the refusal of any claim to his innocence.

The Good, the (Breaking) Bad and the Ugly

I'm the good guy who went to jail... because I'm good.

“I’m the good guy who went to jail… because I’m good.”

Director Scott Waugh (who even serves as co-editor) takes up his fascination for gritty, grounded and realist action to see every race-to-the-finish to perfection. As we’ve already seen in his previous film Act of Valor, he knows edge-of-the-seat action movie direction pretty well, and it shows. In collaboration with the stunt team, Waugh has been able to execute some of the most thrilling car races on screen by far. As also seen in the filmmaking techniques of his former film, viewers will see the reason why: the director decided against use of any type of CGI for each of the action set-pieces of the movie, accounting for a lot of realism and practicality in its races and chases. If you’re a fan of car culture films, you’ll know that besides being highly derivative of the relatively dizzyingly popular car-culture movie franchise The Fast and the Furious, Need for Speed tilts more toward the delicious flavour of the films of yore, paying homage especially to a specific title, Bullitt, directed by Peter Yates and starring Steve McQueen. One of the reasons the Mustang is almost another character also associates itself with the makers’ fascination with Yates’ movie. The races have been well edited, what with parallel editing making for a very descriptively smooth movement in scene. What also differentiates these action set pieces from other similar ones is the background score taking a complete backseat; the silence pushing the atmospheric sound design through. Shane Hurlbut’s cinematography and his direction of camera operations make for a merger of epic proportions here. Especially of relevance here is his visual execution of the action sequences. Watch out for the famed Vertigo effect used in a host of chases from the vantage point of the driver, giving an added sense of the edge-of-the-seat speed and immersive dizziness to the viewer. All of the technical shebang is unfortunately wasted on a predictably convenient and an over-simplistically linear screenplay. The protagonist and the antagonist have little to justify themselves with in their character arcs. The dialogues are insanely poor and unimaginative and needed a lot of work. There are some redeeming and heartening moments in the film, but they’re unfortunately, close to rare and far in between.

To Perform or Not to Perform

I'm the bad guy who stayed out of jail... because I'm bad.

“I’m the bad guy who stayed out of jail… because I’m bad.”

A very intelligent decision of the makers was definitely one to choose Aaron Paul as the protagonist of the movie. He gives his all to a character that almost doesn’t deserve his dedication toward his work. Having already shown an extremely dynamic skill-set with Breaking Bad, Paul brings an added charisma and star power to his role. As also seen in some of his other films like the James Ponsoldt directed Smashed, Paul knows broodiness from ravaging emotion, and he delivers both tangents pretty well. Dominic Cooper as antagonist Dino Brewster has the swagger, the arrogance and the chutzpah required for his role, and delivers ably. He is, however, not able to play around with his role, and one can’t blame him. Imogen Poots is gorgeous, and executes her wit with charisma and confidence. Her role is unfortunately conveniently cut short. Michael Keaton in a short role is damn entertaining. Kid Cudi is basically reminiscent of Tyrese Gibson in the Fast and Furious franchise. Others are good.

Worth it?

Overall, Need for Speed is quite the watch for the highly effective edge-of-the-seat action and performances, but the script is disappointing, considering particularly the involvement of John Gatins, who has given us a well-written gem in the form of 2012’s Flight. Flaky character arcs, terribly weak dialogues and a highly convenient story graph do not help at all. Whether it manages to take on The Fast and the Furious would probably be another story altogether, but as a film, there’s certainly a whole lot better ways that it could have taken on its progression. But that’s just my opinion.

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!

#ReadBuySupport

Amazon

iTunes

What to Expect

NEED FOR SPEED, B*TCH!

NEED FOR SPEED, B*TCH!

When gaming giant Electronic Arts decided to back the publishing of the then new car culture game The Need for Speed to be released in the year 1994, they probably wouldn’t have thought there would be a movie on it, much less in the last decade even. This, especially with a franchise as The Fast and The Furious already by and large around the circuit of summer blockbusters. Who knew that Need for Speed would get its own (probable?) cinematic redemption sooner or later? Has this writer been waiting for it? Absolutely. Does he have doubts (especially considering such adaptations as Mortal KombatHitman and Max Payne)? Unfortunately, yes. Fortunately for the film, the credits consist of some very visible silver linings:

  • You’ve got John Gatins (who wrote the Robert Zemmeckis directed drama Flight) co-writing a script with his brother George;
  • You’ve got Scott Waugh, who directed the (admittedly weak-on-script-and-acting, but) technically experimental Act of Valor, coming back to the director’s seat for this one; and of course
  • There’s Badass Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), Breaking the barriers of the small screen, donning the role of the protagonist here.

Definitely a few things to watch out for, aren’t there? At the risk of repeating myself, however, wariness forms a stronger cloud, reminding the potential viewer of the dubious film adaptations of video game franchises.

What’s it About?

The story is pretty simple, actually. No frills, no complexities; just an oversimplified, predictable, cookie-cutter story. Toby Marshall (Aaron Paul) is a car mechanic in severe debt by day, and a mad race-car driver by night. By a twist of fate, he is set up and put to prison for two years. He vows revenge, both for the death of his friend and for the refusal of any claim to his innocence.

The Good, the (Breaking) Bad and the Ugly

I'm the good guy who went to jail... because I'm good.

“I’m the good guy who went to jail… because I’m good.”

Director Scott Waugh (who even serves as co-editor) takes up his fascination for gritty, grounded and realist action to see every race-to-the-finish to perfection. As we’ve already seen in his previous film Act of Valor, he knows edge-of-the-seat action movie direction pretty well, and it shows. In collaboration with the stunt team, Waugh has been able to execute some of the most thrilling car races on screen by far. As also seen in the filmmaking techniques of his former film, viewers will see the reason why: the director decided against use of any type of CGI for each of the action set-pieces of the movie, accounting for a lot of realism and practicality in its races and chases. If you’re a fan of car culture films, you’ll know that besides being highly derivative of the relatively dizzyingly popular car-culture movie franchise The Fast and the Furious, Need for Speed tilts more toward the delicious flavour of the films of yore, paying homage especially to a specific title, Bullitt, directed by Peter Yates and starring Steve McQueen. One of the reasons the Mustang is almost another character also associates itself with the makers’ fascination with Yates’ movie. The races have been well edited, what with parallel editing making for a very descriptively smooth movement in scene. What also differentiates these action set pieces from other similar ones is the background score taking a complete backseat; the silence pushing the atmospheric sound design through. Shane Hurlbut’s cinematography and his direction of camera operations make for a merger of epic proportions here. Especially of relevance here is his visual execution of the action sequences. Watch out for the famed Vertigo effect used in a host of chases from the vantage point of the driver, giving an added sense of the edge-of-the-seat speed and immersive dizziness to the viewer. All of the technical shebang is unfortunately wasted on a predictably convenient and an over-simplistically linear screenplay. The protagonist and the antagonist have little to justify themselves with in their character arcs. The dialogues are insanely poor and unimaginative and needed a lot of work. There are some redeeming and heartening moments in the film, but they’re unfortunately, close to rare and far in between.

To Perform or Not to Perform

I'm the bad guy who stayed out of jail... because I'm bad.

“I’m the bad guy who stayed out of jail… because I’m bad.”

A very intelligent decision of the makers was definitely one to choose Aaron Paul as the protagonist of the movie. He gives his all to a character that almost doesn’t deserve his dedication toward his work. Having already shown an extremely dynamic skill-set with Breaking Bad, Paul brings an added charisma and star power to his role. As also seen in some of his other films like the James Ponsoldt directed Smashed, Paul knows broodiness from ravaging emotion, and he delivers both tangents pretty well. Dominic Cooper as antagonist Dino Brewster has the swagger, the arrogance and the chutzpah required for his role, and delivers ably. He is, however, not able to play around with his role, and one can’t blame him. Imogen Poots is gorgeous, and executes her wit with charisma and confidence. Her role is unfortunately conveniently cut short. Michael Keaton in a short role is damn entertaining. Kid Cudi is basically reminiscent of Tyrese Gibson in the Fast and Furious franchise. Others are good.

Worth it?

Overall, Need for Speed is quite the watch for the highly effective edge-of-the-seat action and performances, but the script is disappointing, considering particularly the involvement of John Gatins, who has given us a well-written gem in the form of 2012’s Flight. Flaky character arcs, terribly weak dialogues and a highly convenient story graph do not help at all. Whether it manages to take on The Fast and the Furious would probably be another story altogether, but as a film, there’s certainly a whole lot better ways that it could have taken on its progression. But that’s just my opinion.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us

#ReadBuySupport

Amazon

iTunes

What to Expect

NEED FOR SPEED, B*TCH!

NEED FOR SPEED, B*TCH!

When gaming giant Electronic Arts decided to back the publishing of the then new car culture game The Need for Speed to be released in the year 1994, they probably wouldn’t have thought there would be a movie on it, much less in the last decade even. This, especially with a franchise as The Fast and The Furious already by and large around the circuit of summer blockbusters. Who knew that Need for Speed would get its own (probable?) cinematic redemption sooner or later? Has this writer been waiting for it? Absolutely. Does he have doubts (especially considering such adaptations as Mortal KombatHitman and Max Payne)? Unfortunately, yes. Fortunately for the film, the credits consist of some very visible silver linings:

  • You’ve got John Gatins (who wrote the Robert Zemmeckis directed drama Flight) co-writing a script with his brother George;
  • You’ve got Scott Waugh, who directed the (admittedly weak-on-script-and-acting, but) technically experimental Act of Valor, coming back to the director’s seat for this one; and of course
  • There’s Badass Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), Breaking the barriers of the small screen, donning the role of the protagonist here.

Definitely a few things to watch out for, aren’t there? At the risk of repeating myself, however, wariness forms a stronger cloud, reminding the potential viewer of the dubious film adaptations of video game franchises.

What’s it About?

The story is pretty simple, actually. No frills, no complexities; just an oversimplified, predictable, cookie-cutter story. Toby Marshall (Aaron Paul) is a car mechanic in severe debt by day, and a mad race-car driver by night. By a twist of fate, he is set up and put to prison for two years. He vows revenge, both for the death of his friend and for the refusal of any claim to his innocence.

The Good, the (Breaking) Bad and the Ugly

I'm the good guy who went to jail... because I'm good.

“I’m the good guy who went to jail… because I’m good.”

Director Scott Waugh (who even serves as co-editor) takes up his fascination for gritty, grounded and realist action to see every race-to-the-finish to perfection. As we’ve already seen in his previous film Act of Valor, he knows edge-of-the-seat action movie direction pretty well, and it shows. In collaboration with the stunt team, Waugh has been able to execute some of the most thrilling car races on screen by far. As also seen in the filmmaking techniques of his former film, viewers will see the reason why: the director decided against use of any type of CGI for each of the action set-pieces of the movie, accounting for a lot of realism and practicality in its races and chases. If you’re a fan of car culture films, you’ll know that besides being highly derivative of the relatively dizzyingly popular car-culture movie franchise The Fast and the Furious, Need for Speed tilts more toward the delicious flavour of the films of yore, paying homage especially to a specific title, Bullitt, directed by Peter Yates and starring Steve McQueen. One of the reasons the Mustang is almost another character also associates itself with the makers’ fascination with Yates’ movie. The races have been well edited, what with parallel editing making for a very descriptively smooth movement in scene. What also differentiates these action set pieces from other similar ones is the background score taking a complete backseat; the silence pushing the atmospheric sound design through. Shane Hurlbut’s cinematography and his direction of camera operations make for a merger of epic proportions here. Especially of relevance here is his visual execution of the action sequences. Watch out for the famed Vertigo effect used in a host of chases from the vantage point of the driver, giving an added sense of the edge-of-the-seat speed and immersive dizziness to the viewer. All of the technical shebang is unfortunately wasted on a predictably convenient and an over-simplistically linear screenplay. The protagonist and the antagonist have little to justify themselves with in their character arcs. The dialogues are insanely poor and unimaginative and needed a lot of work. There are some redeeming and heartening moments in the film, but they’re unfortunately, close to rare and far in between.

To Perform or Not to Perform

I'm the bad guy who stayed out of jail... because I'm bad.

“I’m the bad guy who stayed out of jail… because I’m bad.”

A very intelligent decision of the makers was definitely one to choose Aaron Paul as the protagonist of the movie. He gives his all to a character that almost doesn’t deserve his dedication toward his work. Having already shown an extremely dynamic skill-set with Breaking Bad, Paul brings an added charisma and star power to his role. As also seen in some of his other films like the James Ponsoldt directed Smashed, Paul knows broodiness from ravaging emotion, and he delivers both tangents pretty well. Dominic Cooper as antagonist Dino Brewster has the swagger, the arrogance and the chutzpah required for his role, and delivers ably. He is, however, not able to play around with his role, and one can’t blame him. Imogen Poots is gorgeous, and executes her wit with charisma and confidence. Her role is unfortunately conveniently cut short. Michael Keaton in a short role is damn entertaining. Kid Cudi is basically reminiscent of Tyrese Gibson in the Fast and Furious franchise. Others are good.

Worth it?

Overall, Need for Speed is quite the watch for the highly effective edge-of-the-seat action and performances, but the script is disappointing, considering particularly the involvement of John Gatins, who has given us a well-written gem in the form of 2012’s Flight. Flaky character arcs, terribly weak dialogues and a highly convenient story graph do not help at all. Whether it manages to take on The Fast and the Furious would probably be another story altogether, but as a film, there’s certainly a whole lot better ways that it could have taken on its progression. But that’s just my opinion.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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