No Escape

Moderately entertaining escapism


No Escape

  • Moderately entertaining escapism

No Escape

  • Moderately entertaining escapism


Rated

R

Starring

Lake Bell
Owen Wilson
Pierce Brosnan

Written by

John Erick Dowdle
Drew Dowdle

Directed by

John Erick Dowdle


coming up

What to Expect

No Escape, true to its name, is about getting stuck in a dangerous situation from which there is seemingly ‘no escape’. The apt title delivers on its promise of a sticky situation and the many set-pieces from which our protagonists try repeatedly to get out of. I didn’t get a chance to look at the trailer beforehand, so my expectations from the movie were linked to the synopsis and the title. The casting of Owen Wilson and Pierce Brosnan was certainly an additional draw.

Now, the tricky part is managing expectations; are you as audience looking to get only what the trailers promised as a snippet, or are you expecting to find something beyond? Your expectation levels before the screening will strictly define your satisfaction level post viewing.

What’s it About?

A young entrepreneur (Owen Wilson; The Big Year), after a failed start up in the USA, is forced to take a job in an MNC & relocate with his family to an unnamed country somewhere in Asia (the only thing we know for sure is that it neighbours Vietnam). This unnamed country in question has had been on the brink of a civil war which is triggered by a turn of events coinciding with the arrival of the family, plunging everything in chaos with a deep seated hatred against all foreigners who are executed right at sight. The family tries to wriggle their way out desperately and gets some help from an unknown person they got acquainted briefly with.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

(L-R) Claire Geare, Owen Wilson, Sterling Jerins, and Lake Bell star in No ESCAPE

RUN RUN RUN! Oh wait why am I smiling? Because I’m Owen Wilson!

No Escape gets to business fairly quickly without the drag of a back story or the promise of a complex explanation. It’s akin to our players being dropped in a video game in a city of madness where all they have to do is survive at any cost. That part is well done, albeit with many liberties. The slick editing by Elliot Greenberg and the handheld camerawork, directed by Leo Hinstin is a major plus in highlighting and escalating the tension. Once the chase stops for a few minutes, however, is when you start to question everything around it. The story that just unfolded starts to seem extreme and quickly takes the form of being incomprehensible and downright crazy. To explain my disbelief and difficulty in understanding I’d like to state the example of Joshua Oppenheimer’s brilliant documentary The Act of Killing, which tries to get behind the minds of the people who commit mass murders and makes an effort to establish them as commoners who descended into a phase of madness. Director John Erick Dowdle obviously doesn’t have any such ambition and clearly establishes the killers as bad people, though it tries to offer a feeble explanation by the end, which I’m afraid isn’t good enough. Even the third act is way too laughably simplistic in nature. I’d like to go back to the question of expectations from the film because if you suspend disbelief and are not going to ask any questions, then this is just the kind of wholesale, generic cinema that the months of July and August bring in bulk.

To Perform or Not to Perform

(L-R) Pierce Brosnan and Owen Wilson star in No ESCAPE

Dude, like can you take me to Q? I need gadgets and stuff to win this war!

The actors here don’t have much to do except look frightened, confused and run helter-skelter. I’m happy to report that the Brady Bunch here does that part well. Owen Wilson (The Big Year), with some experience of being left ‘Behind Enemy Lines’, has history of running for dear life and he does that once more competently. The multi-talented Lake Bell (In a World) is a notch better at it and gives apt support to the narrative. The inclusion of Pierce Brosnan (The November Man) is a surprise, considering he barely has anything to do except commit kamikaze. The performers here really are the technical team and they’ve played their parts well.

Worth it?

If you are bored on a lazy afternoon, grab a bag of munchies and settle down for some thrills with No Escape, but if your mind is the kind that asks questions and analyzes a lot, then please stay away.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Lake Bell
Owen Wilson
Pierce Brosnan

Written by

John Erick Dowdle
Drew Dowdle

Directed by

John Erick Dowdle


What to Expect

No Escape, true to its name, is about getting stuck in a dangerous situation from which there is seemingly ‘no escape’. The apt title delivers on its promise of a sticky situation and the many set-pieces from which our protagonists try repeatedly to get out of. I didn’t get a chance to look at the trailer beforehand, so my expectations from the movie were linked to the synopsis and the title. The casting of Owen Wilson and Pierce Brosnan was certainly an additional draw.

Now, the tricky part is managing expectations; are you as audience looking to get only what the trailers promised as a snippet, or are you expecting to find something beyond? Your expectation levels before the screening will strictly define your satisfaction level post viewing.

What’s it About?

A young entrepreneur (Owen Wilson; The Big Year), after a failed start up in the USA, is forced to take a job in an MNC & relocate with his family to an unnamed country somewhere in Asia (the only thing we know for sure is that it neighbours Vietnam). This unnamed country in question has had been on the brink of a civil war which is triggered by a turn of events coinciding with the arrival of the family, plunging everything in chaos with a deep seated hatred against all foreigners who are executed right at sight. The family tries to wriggle their way out desperately and gets some help from an unknown person they got acquainted briefly with.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

(L-R) Claire Geare, Owen Wilson, Sterling Jerins, and Lake Bell star in No ESCAPE

RUN RUN RUN! Oh wait why am I smiling? Because I’m Owen Wilson!

No Escape gets to business fairly quickly without the drag of a back story or the promise of a complex explanation. It’s akin to our players being dropped in a video game in a city of madness where all they have to do is survive at any cost. That part is well done, albeit with many liberties. The slick editing by Elliot Greenberg and the handheld camerawork, directed by Leo Hinstin is a major plus in highlighting and escalating the tension. Once the chase stops for a few minutes, however, is when you start to question everything around it. The story that just unfolded starts to seem extreme and quickly takes the form of being incomprehensible and downright crazy. To explain my disbelief and difficulty in understanding I’d like to state the example of Joshua Oppenheimer’s brilliant documentary The Act of Killing, which tries to get behind the minds of the people who commit mass murders and makes an effort to establish them as commoners who descended into a phase of madness. Director John Erick Dowdle obviously doesn’t have any such ambition and clearly establishes the killers as bad people, though it tries to offer a feeble explanation by the end, which I’m afraid isn’t good enough. Even the third act is way too laughably simplistic in nature. I’d like to go back to the question of expectations from the film because if you suspend disbelief and are not going to ask any questions, then this is just the kind of wholesale, generic cinema that the months of July and August bring in bulk.

To Perform or Not to Perform

(L-R) Pierce Brosnan and Owen Wilson star in No ESCAPE

Dude, like can you take me to Q? I need gadgets and stuff to win this war!

The actors here don’t have much to do except look frightened, confused and run helter-skelter. I’m happy to report that the Brady Bunch here does that part well. Owen Wilson (The Big Year), with some experience of being left ‘Behind Enemy Lines’, has history of running for dear life and he does that once more competently. The multi-talented Lake Bell (In a World) is a notch better at it and gives apt support to the narrative. The inclusion of Pierce Brosnan (The November Man) is a surprise, considering he barely has anything to do except commit kamikaze. The performers here really are the technical team and they’ve played their parts well.

Worth it?

If you are bored on a lazy afternoon, grab a bag of munchies and settle down for some thrills with No Escape, but if your mind is the kind that asks questions and analyzes a lot, then please stay away.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Lake Bell
Owen Wilson
Pierce Brosnan
Director John Erick Dowdle
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

Survival thriller swag!

Survival thriller swag!

No Escape, true to its name, is about getting stuck in a dangerous situation from which there is seemingly ‘no escape’. The apt title delivers on its promise of a sticky situation and the many set-pieces from which our protagonists try repeatedly to get out of. I didn’t get a chance to look at the trailer beforehand, so my expectations from the movie were linked to the synopsis and the title. The casting of Owen Wilson and Pierce Brosnan was certainly an additional draw.

Now, the tricky part is managing expectations; are you as audience looking to get only what the trailers promised as a snippet, or are you expecting to find something beyond? Your expectation levels before the screening will strictly define your satisfaction level post viewing.

What’s it About?

A young entrepreneur (Owen Wilson; The Big Year), after a failed start up in the USA, is forced to take a job in an MNC & relocate with his family to an unnamed country somewhere in Asia (the only thing we know for sure is that it neighbours Vietnam). This unnamed country in question has had been on the brink of a civil war which is triggered by a turn of events coinciding with the arrival of the family, plunging everything in chaos with a deep seated hatred against all foreigners who are executed right at sight. The family tries to wriggle their way out desperately and gets some help from an unknown person they got acquainted briefly with.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

(L-R) Claire Geare, Owen Wilson, Sterling Jerins, and Lake Bell star in No ESCAPE

RUN RUN RUN! Oh wait why am I smiling? Because I’m Owen Wilson!

No Escape gets to business fairly quickly without the drag of a back story or the promise of a complex explanation. It’s akin to our players being dropped in a video game in a city of madness where all they have to do is survive at any cost. That part is well done, albeit with many liberties. The slick editing by Elliot Greenberg and the handheld camerawork, directed by Leo Hinstin is a major plus in highlighting and escalating the tension. Once the chase stops for a few minutes, however, is when you start to question everything around it. The story that just unfolded starts to seem extreme and quickly takes the form of being incomprehensible and downright crazy. To explain my disbelief and difficulty in understanding I’d like to state the example of Joshua Oppenheimer’s brilliant documentary The Act of Killing, which tries to get behind the minds of the people who commit mass murders and makes an effort to establish them as commoners who descended into a phase of madness. Director John Erick Dowdle obviously doesn’t have any such ambition and clearly establishes the killers as bad people, though it tries to offer a feeble explanation by the end, which I’m afraid isn’t good enough. Even the third act is way too laughably simplistic in nature. I’d like to go back to the question of expectations from the film because if you suspend disbelief and are not going to ask any questions, then this is just the kind of wholesale, generic cinema that the months of July and August bring in bulk.

To Perform or Not to Perform

(L-R) Pierce Brosnan and Owen Wilson star in No ESCAPE

Dude, like can you take me to Q? I need gadgets and stuff to win this war!

The actors here don’t have much to do except look frightened, confused and run helter-skelter. I’m happy to report that the Brady Bunch here does that part well. Owen Wilson (The Big Year), with some experience of being left ‘Behind Enemy Lines’, has history of running for dear life and he does that once more competently. The multi-talented Lake Bell (In a World) is a notch better at it and gives apt support to the narrative. The inclusion of Pierce Brosnan (The November Man) is a surprise, considering he barely has anything to do except commit kamikaze. The performers here really are the technical team and they’ve played their parts well.

Worth it?

If you are bored on a lazy afternoon, grab a bag of munchies and settle down for some thrills with No Escape, but if your mind is the kind that asks questions and analyzes a lot, then please stay away.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Lake Bell
Owen Wilson
Pierce Brosnan
Director John Erick Dowdle
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

No Escape, true to its name, is about getting stuck in a dangerous situation from which there is seemingly ‘no escape’. The apt title delivers on its promise of a sticky situation and the many set-pieces from which our protagonists try repeatedly to get out of. I didn’t get a chance to look at the trailer beforehand, so my expectations from the movie were linked to the synopsis and the title. The casting of Owen Wilson and Pierce Brosnan was certainly an additional draw.

Now, the tricky part is managing expectations; are you as audience looking to get only what the trailers promised as a snippet, or are you expecting to find something beyond? Your expectation levels before the screening will strictly define your satisfaction level post viewing.

What’s it About?

A young entrepreneur (Owen Wilson; The Big Year), after a failed start up in the USA, is forced to take a job in an MNC & relocate with his family to an unnamed country somewhere in Asia (the only thing we know for sure is that it neighbours Vietnam). This unnamed country in question has had been on the brink of a civil war which is triggered by a turn of events coinciding with the arrival of the family, plunging everything in chaos with a deep seated hatred against all foreigners who are executed right at sight. The family tries to wriggle their way out desperately and gets some help from an unknown person they got acquainted briefly with.

RUN RUN RUN! Oh wait why am I smiling? Because I'm Owen Wilson!

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

No Escape gets to business fairly quickly without the drag of a back story or the promise of a complex explanation. It’s akin to our players being dropped in a video game in a city of madness where all they have to do is survive at any cost. That part is well done, albeit with many liberties. The slick editing by Elliot Greenberg and the handheld camerawork, directed by Leo Hinstin is a major plus in highlighting and escalating the tension. Once the chase stops for a few minutes, however, is when you start to question everything around it. The story that just unfolded starts to seem extreme and quickly takes the form of being incomprehensible and downright crazy. To explain my disbelief and difficulty in understanding I’d like to state the example of Joshua Oppenheimer’s brilliant documentary The Act of Killing, which tries to get behind the minds of the people who commit mass murders and makes an effort to establish them as commoners who descended into a phase of madness. Director John Erick Dowdle obviously doesn’t have any such ambition and clearly establishes the killers as bad people, though it tries to offer a feeble explanation by the end, which I’m afraid isn’t good enough. Even the third act is way too laughably simplistic in nature. I’d like to go back to the question of expectations from the film because if you suspend disbelief and are not going to ask any questions, then this is just the kind of wholesale, generic cinema that the months of July and August bring in bulk.

Dude, like can you take me to Q? I need gadgets and stuff to win this war!

To Perform or Not to Perform

The actors here don’t have much to do except look frightened, confused and run helter-skelter. I’m happy to report that the Brady Bunch here does that part well. Owen Wilson (The Big Year), with some experience of being left ‘Behind Enemy Lines’, has history of running for dear life and he does that once more competently. The multi-talented Lake Bell (In a World) is a notch better at it and gives apt support to the narrative. The inclusion of Pierce Brosnan (The November Man) is a surprise, considering he barely has anything to do except commit kamikaze. The performers here really are the technical team and they’ve played their parts well.

Worth it?

If you are bored on a lazy afternoon, grab a bag of munchies and settle down for some thrills with No Escape, but if your mind is the kind that asks questions and analyzes a lot, then please stay away.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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