Paper Towns

The fault in our emotional relevance!


Paper Towns

Starring: Nat Wolff, Cara Delevingne
Directed by: Jake Schreier

Consensus: X Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

Paper Towns

Starring: Nat Wolff, Cara Delevingne
Directed by: Jake Schreier

Consensus: X Stars
Comme ci, comme ça


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Nat Wolff
Cara Develingne
Justice Smith
Austin Abrams
Halston Sage

Written by

John Green (novel)
Scott Neustadter
Michael H. Weber

Directed by

Jake Schreier


coming up

What to Expect

We’ve all known all our lives that when something succeeds, it’s but natural to let the tried-and-tested take its course for a winning business formula to kick in. And it’s no surprise that post The Fault in Our Stars, yet another John Green book would most definitely, inevitably, be picked to be adapted to screen. That it’s by the very same screenwriters who helmed the last adaptation definitely helps. And that it’s by those very screenwriters who’re also behind the super-awesome (500) Days of Summer makes it even better.

But of course, there’s also the possibility of the results not exactly being gold all the time.

What’s it About?

Quentin “Q” Jacobsen’s been in love with Margo ever since he’s been a kid. Their deteriorating, now almost non-existent friendship hadn’t been helping at all though. One fine night, she drops into his house, leading to one of the craziest few hours he could ever have had ever – in his life. Margo, in her usual fashion, however, goes missing – except for one small hitch: she leaves behind clues for him, the lover of mystery that she’s always been.

And thus begins an unexpected journey that will change the lives of everyone who’s been a part of it.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns

“SPRAY PAINT BUDDIES! YAY!”

The major problem with Paper Towns is that after the not-so-brief build-up, there’s that lull, which remains ever so consistent throughout most of the film’s first act. The final moments of the act, however, gives the film the much needed thrill it needs. The problem with this also lies in how much the trailer already reveals of the film, which then leads to the second act, most of which we’re already aware of, courtesy – you guessed right – the trailer.

Which leaves us to the third and final act – the conclusion. THIS is probably what actually saves the movie, for not only does it take a not-seen-before direction (for the non-readers of the book), it also gives us a lot to think about human psyche and our expectations of people and how we treat those we may not know much about.

Unlike The Fault in Our Stars, however, the issue lies particularly in how low in emotional relevance this is. Not that it’s a bad thing; the film is filled with the lightheartedness it so badly deserves, and moves like butter. Margo’s mystery itself, and how impulsive her character is, makes the viewer want to solve the mystery with Q. That it can’t exactly get the characters through to us is what the problem actually is. The viewers must feel the need to connect with them – and there’s a high chance they won’t be able to. It’s a shame, considering the one who’s helmed the execution of the film (Jake Schreier) has also made the critically acclaimed comedy Robot & Frank.

The film’s supported by breezy, glitzy cinematography that plays up mostly to romanticize each frame, dipping them in honey. The supporting music is extremely strong, with singles by HAIM and Vampire Weekend being only a couple amongst the best in business; the credit of the compilation going only to soundtrack producer Kevin Weaver and music supervisor Season Kent (both of whom have also been a part of yet another winning soundtrack in the form of the last John Green adaptation). John Debney and Son Lux’s music does a lot of justice to each scene’s elevation, giving every form of realism just the right amount of surrealist emotion. Jacob Craycroft edit’s the film in a linear fashion, with most of his edit decisions being conventional. The production design of the film is suitably expansive for the genre.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns (II)

“Ugh can you open the camera? I don’t know how to use this shit.”

Nat Wolff seems extremely relaxed in his role of Q, which is both a good – for obvious reasons – and bad – for reasons of non-dynamism – thing. Cara Delevingne is terrific. There’s going to be a lot of people criticizing her, but for what she’s told to play, she’s extremely sharp, confident, and – by the end of the film – rather surprisingly relevant and relatable to the viewer. Justice Smith is fun as the reserved high-schooler, while Austin Abrams fulfils awkward, perverted little Bloody Ben to his fullest. Halston Sage is efficient. Others are good.

Oh, and for the fans of young adult adaptations of late, there’s a lot to like in terms of surprises.

Worth it?

Is the movie perfect? Not by a mile and a half. Is it on par with The Fault in Our Stars? Well, not exactly. But is the movie bad? Not at all. It’s a consistently watchable film that banks on lightheartedness and the mystery of Margo Roth Spiegelman to a rather good extent. Hardcore fans of the book may love it, like fans of most young adult books do, but for those looking to watch an emotionally fulfilling movie that’s additionally also not ruined by the trailer, this might not be it.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Nat Wolff
Cara Develingne
Justice Smith
Austin Abrams
Halston Sage

Written by

John Green (novel)
Scott Neustadter
Michael H. Weber

Directed by

Jake Schreier


What to Expect

We’ve all known all our lives that when something succeeds, it’s but natural to let the tried-and-tested take its course for a winning business formula to kick in. And it’s no surprise that post The Fault in Our Stars, yet another John Green book would most definitely, inevitably, be picked to be adapted to screen. That it’s by the very same screenwriters who helmed the last adaptation definitely helps. And that it’s by those very screenwriters who’re also behind the super-awesome (500) Days of Summer makes it even better.

But of course, there’s also the possibility of the results not exactly being gold all the time.

What’s it About?

Quentin “Q” Jacobsen’s been in love with Margo ever since he’s been a kid. Their deteriorating, now almost non-existent friendship hadn’t been helping at all though. One fine night, she drops into his house, leading to one of the craziest few hours he could ever have had ever – in his life. Margo, in her usual fashion, however, goes missing – except for one small hitch: she leaves behind clues for him, the lover of mystery that she’s always been.

And thus begins an unexpected journey that will change the lives of everyone who’s been a part of it.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns

“SPRAY PAINT BUDDIES! YAY!”

The major problem with Paper Towns is that after the not-so-brief build-up, there’s that lull, which remains ever so consistent throughout most of the film’s first act. The final moments of the act, however, gives the film the much needed thrill it needs. The problem with this also lies in how much the trailer already reveals of the film, which then leads to the second act, most of which we’re already aware of, courtesy – you guessed right – the trailer.

Which leaves us to the third and final act – the conclusion. THIS is probably what actually saves the movie, for not only does it take a not-seen-before direction (for the non-readers of the book), it also gives us a lot to think about human psyche and our expectations of people and how we treat those we may not know much about.

Unlike The Fault in Our Stars, however, the issue lies particularly in how low in emotional relevance this is. Not that it’s a bad thing; the film is filled with the lightheartedness it so badly deserves, and moves like butter. Margo’s mystery itself, and how impulsive her character is, makes the viewer want to solve the mystery with Q. That it can’t exactly get the characters through to us is what the problem actually is. The viewers must feel the need to connect with them – and there’s a high chance they won’t be able to. It’s a shame, considering the one who’s helmed the execution of the film (Jake Schreier) has also made the critically acclaimed comedy Robot & Frank.

The film’s supported by breezy, glitzy cinematography that plays up mostly to romanticize each frame, dipping them in honey. The supporting music is extremely strong, with singles by HAIM and Vampire Weekend being only a couple amongst the best in business; the credit of the compilation going only to soundtrack producer Kevin Weaver and music supervisor Season Kent (both of whom have also been a part of yet another winning soundtrack in the form of the last John Green adaptation). John Debney and Son Lux’s music does a lot of justice to each scene’s elevation, giving every form of realism just the right amount of surrealist emotion. Jacob Craycroft edit’s the film in a linear fashion, with most of his edit decisions being conventional. The production design of the film is suitably expansive for the genre.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns (II)

“Ugh can you open the camera? I don’t know how to use this shit.”

Nat Wolff seems extremely relaxed in his role of Q, which is both a good – for obvious reasons – and bad – for reasons of non-dynamism – thing. Cara Delevingne is terrific. There’s going to be a lot of people criticizing her, but for what she’s told to play, she’s extremely sharp, confident, and – by the end of the film – rather surprisingly relevant and relatable to the viewer. Justice Smith is fun as the reserved high-schooler, while Austin Abrams fulfils awkward, perverted little Bloody Ben to his fullest. Halston Sage is efficient. Others are good.

Oh, and for the fans of young adult adaptations of late, there’s a lot to like in terms of surprises.

Worth it?

Is the movie perfect? Not by a mile and a half. Is it on par with The Fault in Our Stars? Well, not exactly. But is the movie bad? Not at all. It’s a consistently watchable film that banks on lightheartedness and the mystery of Margo Roth Spiegelman to a rather good extent. Hardcore fans of the book may love it, like fans of most young adult books do, but for those looking to watch an emotionally fulfilling movie that’s additionally also not ruined by the trailer, this might not be it.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like Us on Facebookand Twitter!

What to Expect

Paper Towns - Key Art

“Gotta disappear, cause YOLO.”

We’ve all known all our lives that when something succeeds, it’s but natural to let the tried-and-tested take its course for a winning business formula to kick in. And it’s no surprise that post The Fault in Our Stars, yet another John Green book would most definitely, inevitably, be picked to be adapted to screen. That it’s by the very same screenwriters who helmed the last adaptation definitely helps. And that it’s by those very screenwriters who’re also behind the super-awesome (500) Days of Summer makes it even better.

But of course, there’s also the possibility of the results not exactly being gold all the time.

What’s it About?

Quentin “Q” Jacobsen’s been in love with Margo ever since he’s been a kid. Their deteriorating, now almost non-existent friendship hadn’t been helping at all though. One fine night, she drops into his house, leading to one of the craziest few hours he could ever have had ever – in his life. Margo, in her usual fashion, however, goes missing – except for one small hitch: she leaves behind clues for him, the lover of mystery that she’s always been.

And thus begins an unexpected journey that will change the lives of everyone who’s been a part of it.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns

“SPRAY PAINT BUDDIES! YAY!”

The major problem with Paper Towns is that after the not-so-brief build-up, there’s that lull, which remains ever so consistent throughout most of the film’s first act. The final moments of the act, however, gives the film the much needed thrill it needs. The problem with this also lies in how much the trailer already reveals of the film, which then leads to the second act, most of which we’re already aware of, courtesy – you guessed right – the trailer.

Which leaves us to the third and final act – the conclusion. THIS is probably what actually saves the movie, for not only does it take a not-seen-before direction (for the non-readers of the book), it also gives us a lot to think about human psyche and our expectations of people and how we treat those we may not know much about.

Unlike The Fault in Our Stars, however, the issue lies particularly in how low in emotional relevance this is. Not that it’s a bad thing; the film is filled with the lightheartedness it so badly deserves, and moves like butter. Margo’s mystery itself, and how impulsive her character is, makes the viewer want to solve the mystery with Q. That it can’t exactly get the characters through to us is what the problem actually is. The viewers must feel the need to connect with them – and there’s a high chance they won’t be able to. It’s a shame, considering the one who’s helmed the execution of the film (Jake Schreier) has also made the critically acclaimed comedy Robot & Frank.

The film’s supported by breezy, glitzy cinematography that plays up mostly to romanticize each frame, dipping them in honey. The supporting music is extremely strong, with singles by HAIM and Vampire Weekend being only a couple amongst the best in business; the credit of the compilation going only to soundtrack producer Kevin Weaver and music supervisor Season Kent (both of whom have also been a part of yet another winning soundtrack in the form of the last John Green adaptation). John Debney and Son Lux’s music does a lot of justice to each scene’s elevation, giving every form of realism just the right amount of surrealist emotion. Jacob Craycroft edit’s the film in a linear fashion, with most of his edit decisions being conventional. The production design of the film is suitably expansive for the genre.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns (II)

“Ugh can you open the camera? I don’t know how to use this shit.”

Nat Wolff seems extremely relaxed in his role of Q, which is both a good – for obvious reasons – and bad – for reasons of non-dynamism – thing. Cara Delevingne is terrific. There’s going to be a lot of people criticizing her, but for what she’s told to play, she’s extremely sharp, confident, and – by the end of the film – rather surprisingly relevant and relatable to the viewer. Justice Smith is fun as the reserved high-schooler, while Austin Abrams fulfils awkward, perverted little Bloody Ben to his fullest. Halston Sage is efficient. Others are good.

Oh, and for the fans of young adult adaptations of late, there’s a lot to like in terms of surprises.

Worth it?

Is the movie perfect? Not by a mile and a half. Is it on par with The Fault in Our Stars? Well, not exactly. But is the movie bad? Not at all. It’s a consistently watchable film that banks on lightheartedness and the mystery of Margo Roth Spiegelman to a rather good extent. Hardcore fans of the book may love it, like fans of most young adult books do, but for those looking to watch an emotionally fulfilling movie that’s additionally also not ruined by the trailer, this might not be it.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us

What to Expect

Paper Towns - Key Art

“Gotta disappear, cause YOLO.”

We’ve all known all our lives that when something succeeds, it’s but natural to let the tried-and-tested take its course for a winning business formula to kick in. And it’s no surprise that post The Fault in Our Stars, yet another John Green book would most definitely, inevitably, be picked to be adapted to screen. That it’s by the very same screenwriters who helmed the last adaptation definitely helps. And that it’s by those very screenwriters who’re also behind the super-awesome (500) Days of Summer makes it even better.

But of course, there’s also the possibility of the results not exactly being gold all the time.

What’s it About?

Quentin “Q” Jacobsen’s been in love with Margo ever since he’s been a kid. Their deteriorating, now almost non-existent friendship hadn’t been helping at all though. One fine night, she drops into his house, leading to one of the craziest few hours he could ever have had ever – in his life. Margo, in her usual fashion, however, goes missing – except for one small hitch: she leaves behind clues for him, the lover of mystery that she’s always been.

And thus begins an unexpected journey that will change the lives of everyone who’s been a part of it.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns

“SPRAY PAINT BUDDIES! YAY!”

The major problem with Paper Towns is that after the not-so-brief build-up, there’s that lull, which remains ever so consistent throughout most of the film’s first act. The final moments of the act, however, gives the film the much needed thrill it needs. The problem with this also lies in how much the trailer already reveals of the film, which then leads to the second act, most of which we’re already aware of, courtesy – you guessed right – the trailer.

Which leaves us to the third and final act – the conclusion. THIS is probably what actually saves the movie, for not only does it take a not-seen-before direction (for the non-readers of the book), it also gives us a lot to think about human psyche and our expectations of people and how we treat those we may not know much about.

Unlike The Fault in Our Stars, however, the issue lies particularly in how low in emotional relevance this is. Not that it’s a bad thing; the film is filled with the lightheartedness it so badly deserves, and moves like butter. Margo’s mystery itself, and how impulsive her character is, makes the viewer want to solve the mystery with Q. That it can’t exactly get the characters through to us is what the problem actually is. The viewers must feel the need to connect with them – and there’s a high chance they won’t be able to. It’s a shame, considering the one who’s helmed the execution of the film (Jake Schreier) has also made the critically acclaimed comedy Robot & Frank.

The film’s supported by breezy, glitzy cinematography that plays up mostly to romanticize each frame, dipping them in honey. The supporting music is extremely strong, with singles by HAIM and Vampire Weekend being only a couple amongst the best in business; the credit of the compilation going only to soundtrack producer Kevin Weaver and music supervisor Season Kent (both of whom have also been a part of yet another winning soundtrack in the form of the last John Green adaptation). John Debney and Son Lux’s music does a lot of justice to each scene’s elevation, giving every form of realism just the right amount of surrealist emotion. Jacob Craycroft edit’s the film in a linear fashion, with most of his edit decisions being conventional. The production design of the film is suitably expansive for the genre.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Natt-Cara - Paper Towns (II)

“Ugh can you open the camera? I don’t know how to use this shit.”

Nat Wolff seems extremely relaxed in his role of Q, which is both a good – for obvious reasons – and bad – for reasons of non-dynamism – thing. Cara Delevingne is terrific. There’s going to be a lot of people criticizing her, but for what she’s told to play, she’s extremely sharp, confident, and – by the end of the film – rather surprisingly relevant and relatable to the viewer. Justice Smith is fun as the reserved high-schooler, while Austin Abrams fulfils awkward, perverted little Bloody Ben to his fullest. Halston Sage is efficient. Others are good.

Oh, and for the fans of young adult adaptations of late, there’s a lot to like in terms of surprises.

Worth it?

Is the movie perfect? Not by a mile and a half. Is it on par with The Fault in Our Stars? Well, not exactly. But is the movie bad? Not at all. It’s a consistently watchable film that banks on lightheartedness and the mystery of Margo Roth Spiegelman to a rather good extent. Hardcore fans of the book may love it, like fans of most young adult books do, but for those looking to watch an emotionally fulfilling movie that’s additionally also not ruined by the trailer, this might not be it.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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