RAABTA

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Having courted controversy with the release of just its trailer—its makers found themselves slapped with an injunction against its release from the team of S.S Rajamouli’s Magadheera, over claims of plagiarism—interest in Raabta’s premise has increased multifold, if only through curiosity. Solidified by the presence of breakout writing duo Siddharth Singh and Garima Wahal (Goliyon Ki Raasleela Ram-Leela; Eng.: Ram-Leela, A Play of Bullets), however, one would want to know where the film takes its audience.

Of course, there’s the painful possibility of feeling stranded too.

THE MOVIE

We're fly as hell, and that's all that matters

Lost and confused within the film’s very first quarter? That is normal. The neverending fracases that ensue on screen, after all, do have the power to disorient its viewers. At a torturous 147 minutes long, Raabta feels like a strange marriage of Aditya Chopra’s Befikre (Eng.: Carefree) and Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra’s Mirzya. Moreover, between the loud background score and the leads’ frazzled chemistry, Dinesh Vijan’s debut directorial vehicle packs in a lot to roll your eyes with disinterest and widen them with disbelief—and sometimes, you wish you could simultaneously do both.

Take Sushant Singh Rajput’s (Detective Byomkesh Bakshy!) hamfisted performance of Shiv, a narcissistic, womanizing banker, as an example. Among the many flabbergasting qualities the writers give him—the ripped loverboy and self-styled “ladykiller”—the stalker-trifecta stings the most. Never taking no for an answer, barging right into the house of a woman he fancies, and having the audacity to say, “Chicks do not fall for dudes; they fall for diamonds,” with a straight face, Shiv is your friendly neighborhood representation of self-unaware toxic masculinity.

[…] The one who will elicit the loudest groans from spectators would be an unforgivably miscast Jim Sarbh.KELVIN KANTHARAJ VINCENT

Kriti Sanon (Dohchay; Eng.: Hustle) is moderately likable as chocolatier Saira—because if you reside in Europe, the need to be a tour-guide, cinematographer or chocolatier becomes an absolute necessity—but try as she might, she just cannot rise above a half-baked character arc that never explores the trauma it hints. She calls herself a firecracker and wears shirts that read Quinoa and Kale, but filmmakers need to understand that coolth is never always directly proportional to audience interest.

But the one who will elicit the loudest groans from spectators would be an unforgivably miscast Jim Sarbh (A Death in the Gunj). His character—liquor baron Zak Merchant—has been stalking Saira for eight hundred years now (Zak: 1; Shiv: 0) and sees nothing wrong in kidnapping her and trapping her within his castle on a deserted island. Shots continue to be fired, however, because we are shortly transported eight hundred years into the past. Set in an ancient tribal jungle that looks like a cross between Game of Thrones and Asoka, its leads, sporting copious amounts of eyeliner (maybe they’re, um, born with it?), are relatively better here, but by now it has been too late, and you would be done caring.

I'm just here for the lolz

VERDICT

As the past and present predictably merge to lead up to a schmaltzy conclusion, and you walk out shocked at what you have just been through, it dawns on you that nothing¬—not even Deepika Padukone’s (Piku) flashy cameo—could have saved this mess of a movie. Avoid it like the plague, and watch anything else—hell, just watch paint dry—and you would be doing yourself a massive favor.

WATCH THE TRAILER:

About the Author

Kelvin Kantharaj Vincent

Facebook

Voracious reader. Passionate writer. Certified crazy. Relentless foodie.

Star Rating:

A.K.A. (Eng.)

Connection

Country

India

Plot

A meet-cute goes awry with the entry of a third player and a connection that transcends centuries.

Cast

Director

Rated

N/A

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A.K.A. (Eng.) Connection
Cast Sushant Singh Rajput
Kriti Sanon
Jim Sarbh
Director Dinesh Vijan
Star Rating
Raabta explores a meet-cute that goes awry with the entry of a third player and a connection that transcends centuries.

PRE-SCREENING MUSINGS

Having courted controversy with the release of just its trailer—its makers found themselves slapped with an injunction against its release from the team of S.S Rajamouli’s Magadheera, over claims of plagiarism—interest in Raabta’s premise has increased multifold, if only through curiosity. Solidified by the presence of breakout writing duo Siddharth Singh and Garima Wahal (Goliyon Ki Raasleela Ram-Leela; Eng.: Ram-Leela, A Play of Bullets), however, one would want to know where the film takes its audience.

Of course, there’s the painful possibility of feeling stranded too.

THE MOVIE

We're fly as hell, and that's all that matters

Lost and confused within the film’s very first quarter? That is normal. The neverending fracases that ensue on screen, after all, do have the power to disorient its viewers. At a torturous 147 minutes long, Raabta feels like a strange marriage of Aditya Chopra’s Befikre (Eng.: Carefree) and Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra’s Mirzya. Moreover, between the loud background score and the leads’ frazzled chemistry, Dinesh Vijan’s debut directorial vehicle packs in a lot to roll your eyes with disinterest and widen them with disbelief—and sometimes, you wish you could simultaneously do both.

Take Sushant Singh Rajput’s (Detective Byomkesh Bakshy!) hamfisted performance of Shiv, a narcissistic, womanizing banker, as an example. Among the many flabbergasting qualities the writers give him—the ripped loverboy and self-styled “ladykiller”—the stalker-trifecta stings the most. Never taking no for an answer, barging right into the house of a woman he fancies, and having the audacity to say, “Chicks do not fall for dudes; they fall for diamonds,” with a straight face, Shiv is your friendly neighborhood representation of self-unaware toxic masculinity.

[…] The one who will elicit the loudest groans from spectators would be an unforgivably miscast Jim Sarbh.KELVIN KANTHARAJ VINCENT

Kriti Sanon (Dohchay; Eng.: Hustle) is moderately likable as chocolatier Saira—because if you reside in Europe, the need to be a tour-guide, cinematographer or chocolatier becomes an absolute necessity—but try as she might, she just cannot rise above a half-baked character arc that never explores the trauma it hints. She calls herself a firecracker and wears shirts that read Quinoa and Kale, but filmmakers need to understand that coolth is never always directly proportional to audience interest.

But the one who will elicit the loudest groans from spectators would be an unforgivably miscast Jim Sarbh (A Death in the Gunj). His character—liquor baron Zak Merchant—has been stalking Saira for eight hundred years now (Zak: 1; Shiv: 0) and sees nothing wrong in kidnapping her and trapping her within his castle on a deserted island. Shots continue to be fired, however, because we are shortly transported eight hundred years into the past. Set in an ancient tribal jungle that looks like a cross between Game of Thrones and Asoka, its leads, sporting copious amounts of eyeliner (maybe they’re, um, born with it?), are relatively better here, but by now it has been too late, and you would be done caring.

I'm just here for the lolz
As the past and present predictably merge to lead up to a schmaltzy conclusion, and you walk out shocked at what you have just been through, it dawns on you that nothing—not even Deepika Padukone’s (Piku) flashy cameo—could have saved this mess of a movie. Avoid it like the plague, and watch anything else—hell, just watch paint dry—and you would be doing yourself a massive favor.

WATCH THE TRAILER:

About the Author

Kelvin Kantharaj Vincent

Facebook

Voracious reader. Passionate writer. Certified crazy. Relentless foodie.

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