Ricki and the Flash

Works well in retrospect


Ricki and the Flash

  • Works well in retrospect

Ricki and the Flash

  • Works well in retrospect


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Meryl Streep
Kevin Kline
Mamie Gummer
Rick Springfield
Sebastian Stan

Written by

Diablo Cody

Directed by

Jonathan Demme


coming up

What to Expect

Any films involving Diablo Cody involves a certain set of expectations. After all, she’s been a part of such critically welcomed comedy-dramas as Juno and Young Adult, so there’s an obvious level of pressure when it comes to having to deliver for a film. Add to that the strong cast, comprising of Meryl Streep (Adaptation.), Kevin Kline, and (to a rather interesting effect) Mamie Gummer.

As usual, you’re seeing Streep in yet another against-type role, and unusually, you’re seeing Streep’s off-screen daughter playing her on-screen daughter. So there’s definitely some promise. Great cast, great writer, and a commendable director in Jonathan Demme (Rachel Getting Married); I mean, what could go wrong here?

What’s it About?

Rock musician Linda Brummer (Streep; August: Osage County), who loves to be called by her pseudonym Ricki Rendazzo, is called on by her ex-husband (Kline; The Emperor’s Club) to help her daughter over a bitter separation which has driven her to suicidal bouts and a possibility of major depressive disorder.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

In perfect sync

In perfect sync

So the promised plot of the film, as stated, may superficially be about an estranged mother of three coming back and causing a pandemonium while trying to sort out her daughter’s issues. This leads us to think that the movie might consistently follow a certain template. The twist, however, is that there are certain narrative turns you don’t expect within the movie. Also, while the movie begins with a certain storyline, it does end up getting progressively (and oft regressively) vaguer – and thereby dubiously expansive – by acts 2 and 3.

This does not by any chance mean the movie is terrible. What it does signify, however, is that the inconsistent, sometimes-in-limbo screenplay screeches into an abrupt halt at more than one place; and for no good reason. (A friend I went with whispered urgently into my ear somewhere during the film’s awkward, snail-paced midpoint, “What is the point of this movie?”. I justifiably claimed not to know.) This definitely has a major chance to cloud the viewers’ judgment on the very first viewing, making the audience restless almost. And I did immediately claim my opinion on it, loud and clear, on getting out of the cinemas.

But as I was traveling back home, something else happened; something different. I was ruminating in flashes of some of the movie’s better scenes, and they were boding extremely well with me. A particular scene with Kline, Streep and Gummer together at home on a particular night acts beautifully as a symbol of redemption – if only of lost time. The penultimate minutes bring back some of that warmth; some of that emotional genuineness that may not have quite been seen yet. Yes, the movie makes one of the biggest missteps with its schmaltzy, predictable and overlong climax, but here’s the deal. There’s so much else that eventually lands up to make you think. An arguable scene where Ricki breaks down at one of her gigs, comparing the amount of criticism she receives to the unquestioned stardom of Mick Jagger may seem trite, but on further thought, there’s no right or wrong place to break down, or reverberate your anger to, is there? There was no way she could get back at the family she left for scorning her over her “questionable” decisions. And so, the audience is the only outlet she seems to have.

Strictly stating facts, the above plusses do not wash off the sins of inconsistency in narrative, plot twists and tonal shifts. It still does make it a film that gives us enough to think about in terms of stereotype-breaking, hypocrisy when dealing with similar stylistic, career and personal choices of different genders – and how much we ultimately hold each gender responsible for what they decide. And this is exactly what makes you think hours after you’ve watched the film already.

Although I can see that I’ve digressed at the cost of skimming over the basic technical round-up of the film now, haven’t I? It isn’t too late though. Declan Quinn has a very strong hold over the moving photography over here. Despite not having extraordinarily dynamic framing, it has a very raw; almost stripped down look. There’s a lot of handheld/steadi-cam camera operations that support the style ably. Wyatt Smith gives the film a smooth knit-together with the help of a standard, no-frills template of edit decisions. The background score isn’t necessarily bad, but the film’s soundtrack comprises of nothing but covers, covers and a lot of covers. I’m now of the vague knowledge that Jonathan Demme’s made a bunch of music documentaries, and his obsession with attention-to-detail in gigs shows a lot in many places. This does get unarguably overindulgent by the second half of its runtime.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Looking back... it doesn't seem so bad, eh?

Looking back… it doesn’t seem so bad, eh?

I guess the two people who literally run the show here are Meryl Streep and Mamie Gummer. The mother-daughter duo are in perfect sync with each other, whether during a showdown or just a quiet moment of Gummer listening to Streep strumming through the guitar. Kevin Kline shows surprising restraint in the first quarter of the film, giving it away for a possible effortlessness that can also be interpreted as a shift to his comfort zone. Audra McDonald is alright, and yet she doesn’t exactly have much to do except for play into a formula. Rick Springfield literally springs up to be the surprise here (pun intended) with his emotional diversity in a couple of intense conversational exchanges. Nick Westrate has a terrific passive-aggressive exchange with Streep to visibly exhibit his chops in, and does it fantastically. He doesn’t necessarily get an opportunity to exhibit it further, but manages to remain in memory. The others are good.

Worth it?

Ah, for this is the dreaded answer I can’t seem to put a finger on. On the one hand, I can’t necessarily either recommend or disregard it, for there may definitely be a resultant polarization of opinion.What I can definitely implore you to do is to give it an unbiased try.

And why, you may ask?

Because this is exactly the kind of film that makes you understand and appreciate its elements more in retrospect than through an immediate reflex action. Diablo Cody and Jonathan Demme may have created a sometimes over-indulgent, oft inconsistent film which definitely may have the potential to superficially disengage some viewers – at first. With quite a few moments that are made to stay however, and with Meryl and Mamie storming the screen with their powerhouse performances, this movie deserves a trial run, if only to see whether – through its cliches and post the inevitable formulaic climax – this sticks around in your head any longer.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Meryl Streep
Kevin Kline
Mamie Gummer
Rick Springfield
Sebastian Stan

Written by

Diablo Cody

Directed by

Jonathan Demme


What to Expect

Any films involving Diablo Cody involves a certain set of expectations. After all, she’s been a part of such critically welcomed comedy-dramas as Juno and Young Adult, so there’s an obvious level of pressure when it comes to having to deliver for a film. Add to that the strong cast, comprising of Meryl Streep (Adaptation.), Kevin Kline, and (to a rather interesting effect) Mamie Gummer.

As usual, you’re seeing Streep in yet another against-type role, and unusually, you’re seeing Streep’s off-screen daughter playing her on-screen daughter. So there’s definitely some promise. Great cast, great writer, and a commendable director in Jonathan Demme (Rachel Getting Married); I mean, what could go wrong here?

What’s it About?

Rock musician Linda Brummer (Streep; August: Osage County), who loves to be called by her pseudonym Ricki Rendazzo, is called on by her ex-husband (Kline; The Emperor’s Club) to help her daughter over a bitter separation which has driven her to suicidal bouts and a possibility of major depressive disorder.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

In perfect sync

In perfect sync

So the promised plot of the film, as stated, may superficially be about an estranged mother of three coming back and causing a pandemonium while trying to sort out her daughter’s issues. This leads us to think that the movie might consistently follow a certain template. The twist, however, is that there are certain narrative turns you don’t expect within the movie. Also, while the movie begins with a certain storyline, it does end up getting progressively (and oft regressively) vaguer – and thereby dubiously expansive – by acts 2 and 3.

This does not by any chance mean the movie is terrible. What it does signify, however, is that the inconsistent, sometimes-in-limbo screenplay screeches into an abrupt halt at more than one place; and for no good reason. (A friend I went with whispered urgently into my ear somewhere during the film’s awkward, snail-paced midpoint, “What is the point of this movie?”. I justifiably claimed not to know.) This definitely has a major chance to cloud the viewers’ judgment on the very first viewing, making the audience restless almost. And I did immediately claim my opinion on it, loud and clear, on getting out of the cinemas.

But as I was traveling back home, something else happened; something different. I was ruminating in flashes of some of the movie’s better scenes, and they were boding extremely well with me. A particular scene with Kline, Streep and Gummer together at home on a particular night acts beautifully as a symbol of redemption – if only of lost time. The penultimate minutes bring back some of that warmth; some of that emotional genuineness that may not have quite been seen yet. Yes, the movie makes one of the biggest missteps with its schmaltzy, predictable and overlong climax, but here’s the deal. There’s so much else that eventually lands up to make you think. An arguable scene where Ricki breaks down at one of her gigs, comparing the amount of criticism she receives to the unquestioned stardom of Mick Jagger may seem trite, but on further thought, there’s no right or wrong place to break down, or reverberate your anger to, is there? There was no way she could get back at the family she left for scorning her over her “questionable” decisions. And so, the audience is the only outlet she seems to have.

Strictly stating facts, the above plusses do not wash off the sins of inconsistency in narrative, plot twists and tonal shifts. It still does make it a film that gives us enough to think about in terms of stereotype-breaking, hypocrisy when dealing with similar stylistic, career and personal choices of different genders – and how much we ultimately hold each gender responsible for what they decide. And this is exactly what makes you think hours after you’ve watched the film already.

Although I can see that I’ve digressed at the cost of skimming over the basic technical round-up of the film now, haven’t I? It isn’t too late though. Declan Quinn has a very strong hold over the moving photography over here. Despite not having extraordinarily dynamic framing, it has a very raw; almost stripped down look. There’s a lot of handheld/steadi-cam camera operations that support the style ably. Wyatt Smith gives the film a smooth knit-together with the help of a standard, no-frills template of edit decisions. The background score isn’t necessarily bad, but the film’s soundtrack comprises of nothing but covers, covers and a lot of covers. I’m now of the vague knowledge that Jonathan Demme’s made a bunch of music documentaries, and his obsession with attention-to-detail in gigs shows a lot in many places. This does get unarguably overindulgent by the second half of its runtime.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Looking back... it doesn't seem so bad, eh?

Looking back… it doesn’t seem so bad, eh?

I guess the two people who literally run the show here are Meryl Streep and Mamie Gummer. The mother-daughter duo are in perfect sync with each other, whether during a showdown or just a quiet moment of Gummer listening to Streep strumming through the guitar. Kevin Kline shows surprising restraint in the first quarter of the film, giving it away for a possible effortlessness that can also be interpreted as a shift to his comfort zone. Audra McDonald is alright, and yet she doesn’t exactly have much to do except for play into a formula. Rick Springfield literally springs up to be the surprise here (pun intended) with his emotional diversity in a couple of intense conversational exchanges. Nick Westrate has a terrific passive-aggressive exchange with Streep to visibly exhibit his chops in, and does it fantastically. He doesn’t necessarily get an opportunity to exhibit it further, but manages to remain in memory. The others are good.

Worth it?

Ah, for this is the dreaded answer I can’t seem to put a finger on. On the one hand, I can’t necessarily either recommend or disregard it, for there may definitely be a resultant polarization of opinion.What I can definitely implore you to do is to give it an unbiased try.

And why, you may ask?

Because this is exactly the kind of film that makes you understand and appreciate its elements more in retrospect than through an immediate reflex action. Diablo Cody and Jonathan Demme may have created a sometimes over-indulgent, oft inconsistent film which definitely may have the potential to superficially disengage some viewers – at first. With quite a few moments that are made to stay however, and with Meryl and Mamie storming the screen with their powerhouse performances, this movie deserves a trial run, if only to see whether – through its cliches and post the inevitable formulaic climax – this sticks around in your head any longer.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Meryl Streep
Mamie Gummer
Kevin Kline
Director Jonathan Demme
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

ROCKSTAH POWAH.

ROCKSTAH POWAH.

Any films involving Diablo Cody involves a certain set of expectations. After all, she’s been a part of such critically welcomed comedy-dramas as Juno and Young Adult, so there’s an obvious level of pressure when it comes to having to deliver for a film. Add to that the strong cast, comprising of Meryl Streep (Adaptation.), Kevin Kline, and (to a rather interesting effect) Mamie Gummer.

As usual, you’re seeing Streep in yet another against-type role, and unusually, you’re seeing Streep’s off-screen daughter playing her on-screen daughter. So there’s definitely some promise. Great cast, great writer, and a commendable director in Jonathan Demme (Rachel Getting Married); I mean, what could go wrong here?

What’s it About?

Rock musician Linda Brummer (Streep; August: Osage County), who loves to be called by her pseudonym Ricki Rendazzo, is called on by her ex-husband (Kline; The Emperor’s Club) to help her daughter over a bitter separation which has driven her to suicidal bouts and a possibility of major depressive disorder.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

In perfect sync

In perfect sync

So the promised plot of the film, as stated, may superficially be about an estranged mother of three coming back and causing a pandemonium while trying to sort out her daughter’s issues. This leads us to think that the movie might consistently follow a certain template. The twist, however, is that there are certain narrative turns you don’t expect within the movie. Also, while the movie begins with a certain storyline, it does end up getting progressively (and oft regressively) vaguer – and thereby dubiously expansive – by acts 2 and 3.

This does not by any chance mean the movie is terrible. What it does signify, however, is that the inconsistent, sometimes-in-limbo screenplay screeches into an abrupt halt at more than one place; and for no good reason. (A friend I went with whispered urgently into my ear somewhere during the film’s awkward, snail-paced midpoint, “What is the point of this movie?”. I justifiably claimed not to know.) This definitely has a major chance to cloud the viewers’ judgment on the very first viewing, making the audience restless almost. And I did immediately claim my opinion on it, loud and clear, on getting out of the cinemas.

But as I was traveling back home, something else happened; something different. I was ruminating in flashes of some of the movie’s better scenes, and they were boding extremely well with me. A particular scene with Kline, Streep and Gummer together at home on a particular night acts beautifully as a symbol of redemption – if only of lost time. The penultimate minutes bring back some of that warmth; some of that emotional genuineness that may not have quite been seen yet. Yes, the movie makes one of the biggest missteps with its schmaltzy, predictable and overlong climax, but here’s the deal. There’s so much else that eventually lands up to make you think. An arguable scene where Ricki breaks down at one of her gigs, comparing the amount of criticism she receives to the unquestioned stardom of Mick Jagger may seem trite, but on further thought, there’s no right or wrong place to break down, or reverberate your anger to, is there? There was no way she could get back at the family she left for scorning her over her “questionable” decisions. And so, the audience is the only outlet she seems to have.

Strictly stating facts, the above plusses do not wash off the sins of inconsistency in narrative, plot twists and tonal shifts. It still does make it a film that gives us enough to think about in terms of stereotype-breaking, hypocrisy when dealing with similar stylistic, career and personal choices of different genders – and how much we ultimately hold each gender responsible for what they decide. And this is exactly what makes you think hours after you’ve watched the film already.

Although I can see that I’ve digressed at the cost of skimming over the basic technical round-up of the film now, haven’t I? It isn’t too late though. Declan Quinn has a very strong hold over the moving photography over here. Despite not having extraordinarily dynamic framing, it has a very raw; almost stripped down look. There’s a lot of handheld/steadi-cam camera operations that support the style ably. Wyatt Smith gives the film a smooth knit-together with the help of a standard, no-frills template of edit decisions. The background score isn’t necessarily bad, but the film’s soundtrack comprises of nothing but covers, covers and a lot of covers. I’m now of the vague knowledge that Jonathan Demme’s made a bunch of music documentaries, and his obsession with attention-to-detail in gigs shows a lot in many places. This does get unarguably overindulgent by the second half of its runtime.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Looking back... it doesn't seem so bad, eh?

Looking back… it doesn’t seem so bad, eh?

I guess the two people who literally run the show here are Meryl Streep and Mamie Gummer. The mother-daughter duo are in perfect sync with each other, whether during a showdown or just a quiet moment of Gummer listening to Streep strumming through the guitar. Kevin Kline shows surprising restraint in the first quarter of the film, giving it away for a possible effortlessness that can also be interpreted as a shift to his comfort zone. Audra McDonald is alright, and yet she doesn’t exactly have much to do except for play into a formula. Rick Springfield literally springs up to be the surprise here (pun intended) with his emotional diversity in a couple of intense conversational exchanges. Nick Westrate has a terrific passive-aggressive exchange with Streep to visibly exhibit his chops in, and does it fantastically. He doesn’t necessarily get an opportunity to exhibit it further, but manages to remain in memory. The others are good.

Worth it?

Ah, for this is the dreaded answer I can’t seem to put a finger on. On the one hand, I can’t necessarily either recommend or disregard it, for there may definitely be a resultant polarization of opinion.What I can definitely implore you to do is to give it an unbiased try.

And why, you may ask?

Because this is exactly the kind of film that makes you understand and appreciate its elements more in retrospect than through an immediate reflex action. Diablo Cody and Jonathan Demme may have created a sometimes over-indulgent, oft inconsistent film which definitely may have the potential to superficially disengage some viewers – at first. With quite a few moments that are made to stay however, and with Meryl and Mamie storming the screen with their powerhouse performances, this movie deserves a trial run, if only to see whether – through its cliches and post the inevitable formulaic climax – this sticks around in your head any longer.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Meryl Streep
Mamie Gummer
Kevin Kline
Director Jonathan Demme
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

Any films involving Diablo Cody involves a certain set of expectations. After all, she’s been a part of such critically welcomed comedy-dramas as Juno and Young Adult, so there’s an obvious level of pressure when it comes to having to deliver for a film. Add to that the strong cast, comprising of Meryl Streep (Adaptation.), Kevin Kline, and (to a rather interesting effect) Mamie Gummer.

As usual, you’re seeing Streep in yet another against-type role, and unusually, you’re seeing Streep’s off-screen daughter playing her on-screen daughter. So there’s definitely some promise. Great cast, great writer, and a commendable director in Jonathan Demme (Rachel Getting Married); I mean, what could go wrong here?

What’s it About?

Rock musician Linda Brummer (Streep; August: Osage County), who loves to be called by her pseudonym Ricki Rendazzo, is called on by her ex-husband (Kline; The Emperor’s Club) to help her daughter over a bitter separation which has driven her to suicidal bouts and a possibility of major depressive disorder.

In perfect sync

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

So the promised plot of the film, as stated, may superficially be about an estranged mother of three coming back and causing a pandemonium while trying to sort out her daughter’s issues. This leads us to think that the movie might consistently follow a certain template. The twist, however, is that there are certain narrative turns you don’t expect within the movie. Also, while the movie begins with a certain storyline, it does end up getting progressively (and oft regressively) vaguer – and thereby dubiously expansive – by acts 2 and 3.

This does not by any chance mean the movie is terrible. What it does signify, however, is that the inconsistent, sometimes-in-limbo screenplay screeches into an abrupt halt at more than one place; and for no good reason. (A friend I went with whispered urgently into my ear somewhere during the film’s awkward, snail-paced midpoint, “What is the point of this movie?”. I justifiably claimed not to know.) This definitely has a major chance to cloud the viewers’ judgment on the very first viewing, making the audience restless almost. And I did immediately claim my opinion on it, loud and clear, on getting out of the cinemas.

But as I was traveling back home, something else happened; something different. I was ruminating in flashes of some of the movie’s better scenes, and they were boding extremely well with me. A particular scene with Kline, Streep and Gummer together at home on a particular night acts beautifully as a symbol of redemption – if only of lost time. The penultimate minutes bring back some of that warmth; some of that emotional genuineness that may not have quite been seen yet. Yes, the movie makes one of the biggest missteps with its schmaltzy, predictable and overlong climax, but here’s the deal. There’s so much else that eventually lands up to make you think. An arguable scene where Ricki breaks down at one of her gigs, comparing the amount of criticism she receives to the unquestioned stardom of Mick Jagger may seem trite, but on further thought, there’s no right or wrong place to break down, or reverberate your anger to, is there? There was no way she could get back at the family she left for scorning her over her “questionable” decisions. And so, the audience is the only outlet she seems to have.

Strictly stating facts, the above plusses do not wash off the sins of inconsistency in narrative, plot twists and tonal shifts. It still does make it a film that gives us enough to think about in terms of stereotype-breaking, hypocrisy when dealing with similar stylistic, career and personal choices of different genders – and how much we ultimately hold each gender responsible for what they decide. And this is exactly what makes you think hours after you’ve watched the film already.

Although I can see that I’ve digressed at the cost of skimming over the basic technical round-up of the film now, haven’t I? It isn’t too late though. Declan Quinn has a very strong hold over the moving photography over here. Despite not having extraordinarily dynamic framing, it has a very raw; almost stripped down look. There’s a lot of handheld/steadi-cam camera operations that support the style ably. Wyatt Smith gives the film a smooth knit-together with the help of a standard, no-frills template of edit decisions. The background score isn’t necessarily bad, but the film’s soundtrack comprises of nothing but covers, covers and a lot of covers. I’m now of the vague knowledge that Jonathan Demme’s made a bunch of music documentaries, and his obsession with attention-to-detail in gigs shows a lot in many places. This does get unarguably overindulgent by the second half of its runtime.

Looking back... it doesn't seem so bad, eh?

To Perform or Not to Perform

I guess the two people who literally run the show here are Meryl Streep and Mamie Gummer. The mother-daughter duo are in perfect sync with each other, whether during a showdown or just a quiet moment of Gummer listening to Streep strumming through the guitar. Kevin Kline shows surprising restraint in the first quarter of the film, giving it away for a possible effortlessness that can also be interpreted as a shift to his comfort zone. Audra McDonald is alright, and yet she doesn’t exactly have much to do except for play into a formula. Rick Springfield literally springs up to be the surprise here (pun intended) with his emotional diversity in a couple of intense conversational exchanges. Nick Westrate has a terrific passive-aggressive exchange with Streep to visibly exhibit his chops in, and does it fantastically. He doesn’t necessarily get an opportunity to exhibit it further, but manages to remain in memory. The others are good.

Worth it?

Ah, for this is the dreaded answer I can’t seem to put a finger on. On the one hand, I can’t necessarily either recommend or disregard it, for there may definitely be a resultant polarization of opinion.What I can definitely implore you to do is to give it an unbiased try.

And why, you may ask?

Because this is exactly the kind of film that makes you understand and appreciate its elements more in retrospect than through an immediate reflex action. Diablo Cody and Jonathan Demme may have created a sometimes over-indulgent, oft inconsistent film which definitely may have the potential to superficially disengage some viewers – at first. With quite a few moments that are made to stay however, and with Meryl and Mamie storming the screen with their powerhouse performances, this movie deserves a trial run, if only to see whether – through its cliches and post the inevitable formulaic climax – this sticks around in your head any longer.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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