SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

Spider-Man: Homecoming explores Peter Parker’s stint with the Avengers, which has given him a new lease of life—and a cool new super-suit. However, is that all he needs to be the friendly neighborhood superhero?

Spider-Man: Homecoming is the prodigal son of Spider-Man movies—that the studios are aware of it is evident from its title. Sure, the love for Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man trilogy does still exist, but it has been more than a decade since the web-slinger got the universal love and adoration he has always deserved. One would expect Jon Watts, thus, to crumble under the massive pressure—this being his first mainstream movie—but he does not.

Straight Outta Cop Car, Watts dives right into the bright, colorful world of Peter Parker in a Marvel Studios film that’s easily the most visually balanced of the lot. Salvatore Totino’s (Everest) spectacular use of the visual canvas, with the help of vibrant color grading, gives the film its much-needed dynamism. However, that is not all; using Totino’s talents to his advantage, the director brings the film’s eponymous protagonist to his roots—being the friendly neighborhood superhero everyone has come to know and love through the extensively branched-out source over the years.

There is a light touch to Watts’ storytelling method here — quite a surprise, considering his past works also include body-horror Clown, produced by none other than Eli Roth. Propelling the film with dazzling action set-pieces, the director balances it out by fleshing out the world of Peter Parker and his existence in the universe around him. Skewing away from Raimi’s stereotypically nerdy iteration, or Webb’s tonally unfocused character arc, Homecoming gives Parker the world he deserves.

However, if you are looking for another origin story—which, considering the famed character’s history in film, is highly unlikely—this is not the right movie for you. Very much like Batman’s iteration and character arc in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, the film does not depend on spoonfeeding you the answers and jumps straight into Parker’s life and the universe around him. The creators want to give its viewers an indie high-school comedy-drama within the summer blockbuster setup. Sprinkle that with some self-awareness—there are some chuckle-worthy nods to its movie lineage—and voila! A wholesome blend of the Hughes throwback and high-octane action served piping hot for its audience.

[Michael Keaton] shines as the Vulture, bringing about one of the most empathetic antagonists in the Spider-Man franchise since Alfred Molina’s Doc-Ock.ANKIT OJHA

The film’s biggest advantage, however, is that Peter Parker is the kind of teenager we have all known or been at any given point in our lives. While keeping within himself the moral core that many of his fans identify with him, it also gives him massive leeway to make some rather wrong life choices. Tom Holland (The Lost City of Z) reprises his role successfully, bringing with him an absolute consistency between the superhero and his alter-ego. Taking viewers through his many phases of overexcitement, indulgence, and obsession, the actor pulls it off successfully, with his body language never missing a single beat.

Moreover, there is Michael Keaton (Spotlight). He shines as the Vulture, bringing about one of the most empathetic antagonists in the Spider-Man franchise since Alfred Molina’s Doc-Ock. He is not your famously drawling, dripped-in-villainy personality that pulls many of today’s superhero films down. He is an everyman trying to survive and provide for his family and those close to him. The film carves out a life you can invest in, thereby allowing viewers to empathize with a character who has been pushed to make the hardest of life choices to get back up and move forward.

Despite it all, the list of goods does not stop here. The film weaves in a rather diverse cast without shoehorning or tokenizing anyone. Everyone — from Zendaya’s (television’s K.C. Undercover) terrific Michelle to Jacob Batalon as Peter’s best friend Ned and everyone else involved—is just a part of the busy everyday lifestyle, leaving no room for stereotyping. A significant plot twist successfully plays with the internalized racism hard-wired inside us, leaving much room for its viewers to reflect on how easy it is to assume someone’s identity and socio-political surroundings with one simple look.


Spider-Man: Homecoming takes the “super” out of the superhero, providing viewers, instead, with a stripped-down coming-of-age comedy drama within the restrictive structure of a summer blockbuster. The friendly neighborhood web-slinger just got a vibrant new makeover, and we are all here for it.

Watch the trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

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Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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Cast Tom Holland
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Spider-Man: Homecoming explores Peter Parker’s stint with the Avengers, which has given him a new lease of life—and a cool new super-suit. However, is that all he needs to be the friendly neighborhood superhero?


Spider-Man: Homecoming is the prodigal son of Spider-Man movies—that the studios are aware of it is evident from its title. Sure, the love for Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man trilogy does still exist, but it has been more than a decade since the web-slinger got the universal love and adoration he has always deserved. One would expect Jon Watts, thus, to crumble under the massive pressure—this being his first mainstream movie—but he does not.

Straight Outta Cop Car, Watts dives right into the bright, colorful world of Peter Parker in a Marvel Studios film that’s easily the most visually balanced of the lot. Salvatore Totino’s (Everest) spectacular use of the visual canvas, with the help of vibrant color grading, gives the film its much-needed dynamism. However, that is not all; using Totino’s talents to his advantage, the director brings the film’s eponymous protagonist to his roots—being the friendly neighborhood superhero everyone has come to know and love through the extensively branched-out source over the years.

There is a light touch to Watts’ storytelling method here — quite a surprise, considering his past works also include body-horror Clown, produced by none other than Eli Roth. Propelling the film with dazzling action set-pieces, the director balances it out by fleshing out the world of Peter Parker and his existence in the universe around him. Skewing away from Raimi’s stereotypically nerdy iteration, or Webb’s tonally unfocused character arc, Homecoming gives Parker the world he deserves.

However, if you are looking for another origin story—which, considering the famed character’s history in film, is highly unlikely—this is not the right movie for you. Very much like Batman’s iteration and character arc in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, the film does not depend on spoonfeeding you the answers and jumps straight into Parker’s life and the universe around him. The creators want to give its viewers an indie high-school comedy-drama within the summer blockbuster setup. Sprinkle that with some self-awareness—there are some chuckle-worthy nods to its movie lineage—and voila! A wholesome blend of the Hughes throwback and high-octane action served piping hot for its audience.

[Michael Keaton] shines as the Vulture, bringing about one of the most empathetic antagonists in the Spider-Man franchise since Alfred Molina’s Doc-Ock.ANKIT OJHA

The film’s biggest advantage, however, is that Peter Parker is the kind of teenager we have all known or been at any given point in our lives. While keeping within himself the moral core that many of his fans identify with him, it also gives him massive leeway to make some rather wrong life choices. Tom Holland (The Lost City of Z) reprises his role successfully, bringing with him an absolute consistency between the superhero and his alter-ego. Taking viewers through his many phases of overexcitement, indulgence, and obsession, the actor pulls it off successfully, with his body language never missing a single beat.

Moreover, there is Michael Keaton (Spotlight). He shines as the Vulture, bringing about one of the most empathetic antagonists in the Spider-Man franchise since Alfred Molina’s Doc-Ock. He is not your famously drawling, dripped-in-villainy personality that pulls many of today’s superhero films down. He is an everyman trying to survive and provide for his family and those close to him. The film carves out a life you can invest in, thereby allowing viewers to empathize with a character who has been pushed to make the hardest of life choices to get back up and move forward.

Despite it all, the list of goods does not stop here. The film weaves in a rather diverse cast without shoehorning or tokenizing anyone. Everyone — from Zendaya’s (television’s K.C. Undercover) terrific Michelle to Jacob Batalon as Peter’s best friend Ned and everyone else involved—is just a part of the busy everyday lifestyle, leaving no room for stereotyping. A significant plot twist successfully plays with the internalized racism hard-wired inside us, leaving much room for its viewers to reflect on how easy it is to assume someone’s identity and socio-political surroundings with one simple look.


Spider-Man: Homecoming takes the “super” out of the superhero, providing viewers, instead, with a stripped-down coming-of-age comedy drama within the restrictive structure of a summer blockbuster. The friendly neighborhood web-slinger just got a vibrant new makeover, and we are all here for it.

Watch trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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