Star Trek Beyond

Goes beyond empty spectacle!


Star Trek Beyond

  • Goes beyond empty spectacle!

Star Trek Beyond

  • Goes beyond empty spectacle!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Pine
Simon Pegg
Zachary Quinto
Sofia Boutella
Idris Elba

Written by

Simon Pegg
Doug Jung

Directed by

Justin Lin



WHAT TO EXPECT

There’s a lot many people have to say on J. J. Abrams rebooting Star Trek. Known primarily as the Kelvin-verse, the initial fanfare and critical appreciation gave way to major dislike pouring out, courtesy hardcore Trek enthusiasts. But while most would agree that the first one was a fun—if lacking the requisite emotional depth a film like this desperately needed—big-screen action extravaganza, Star Trek Into Darkness had critics receiving the film positively, with fans doing the complete opposite.

The studios unquestionably needed damage control. Damon Lindelof didn’t return for the sequel, writer duo Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman (The Amazing Spider-Man 2) were replaced conveniently with self-confessed Trek fanboy Simon Pegg and Doug Jung (Confidence). As for Abrams, he’s just a producer here. And while things look rosy, there’s just one teensy bit of skepticism viewers will have of the movie.

Justin Lin directs Star Trek Beyond.

Sure, he’s helmed (some of) the moderately well-received second season of True Detective, but nothing truly beats his reputation as the director of four films from the Fast & Furious franchise, a series of kitschy action blockbusters that made a surprising progression from car-culture to high-octane heists that redefine “over-the-top” as a phrase altogether. It’s not surprising, thus, that there will be questions about the possible quality of the end-product.

I, for one, had very little to build my hopes on, considering solely that my opinions of the previous films within Abrams’s reboot aren’t entirely favorable—this mostly has to do with his overt dependence on spectacle and the irreverent hurry to finish the movie, causing significant harm to possible world building and character evolution. Additionally, in spite of Fast & Furious’s dependance on action made to flabbergast more than anything else, Lin did make sure to bring a flailing franchise gradually back together with Tokyo Drift—one film at a time—and that’s a feat not a lot of us can ignore.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Jim Kirk (Chris Pine) is second-guessing his Captainship and his motivation to continue his explorations aboard the Enterprise. Spock (Zachary Quinto) seems to be fighting his personal inner demons. Both of their internal battles, however, are put on hold when a rescue mission turns into a living, breathing nightmare.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Favorite chairs

Favorite chairs

Let’s get this straight: Star Trek Beyond is a rather well-made action film, and any possible apprehensions on Lin’s execution of the material can safely be laid to rest. Qualitatively even—and I’m going out on a limb here—it’s miles ahead of its last two predecessors for many reasons. Of those responsible, the one that stands out would be Pegg and Jung’s powerful writing.  Most of the rather glaring faults made by Abrams, Orci, and Kurtzman—the shameful lack of character development and world-building, worsened only by their total dependence to spectacle and performances and a strange urgency to get done with every plot point till the credits roll—have been smartly fixed. Through justifiably expository conversation, viewers are able to gain a rather clear perspective on the psyche of Kirk (previously shown to be nothing more than a rebel without a cause), Spock (whose shamefully unexploited half-Vulcan heritage deserved a lot more focus than just a few jarring Spock-loses-it phases thrown in for quasi-multidimensionality), and—surprisingly or unsurprisingly—Montgomery Scott.

The film also introduces us to some brand-new characters—there’s Jaylah, a fierce survivor who’s well-equipped to cause you some serious damage without anybody’s help, and Krall, the undefeated antagonistic force who’ll stop at nothing to get what he wants. Now while the former could almost unanimously be quite a well-defined character, the latter might be subject to polarizing feedback. This, however, is not a flaw, and allow me to explain just why. Pegged mostly as an antagonist, Krall may never have been intended to be so. While the character means harm, his trajectory echoes that of an anti-hero, and the more one thinks of this within the context of the plot, the clearer the intent gets.

The [film’s] creators visually introduce viewers to [its] environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.Ankit Ojha

Look at how BEAUTIFUL Yorktown is!

Look at how BEAUTIFUL Yorktown is!

Sure, the film’s more than occasionally cheesy, but it’s the kind viewers will find delicious enough to have at. And with technical filmmaking so glorious, Star Trek Beyond just ends up being the perfect mixture of heart and spectacle. Watch out for some of the most impressive action set-pieces, prepped by Stephen F. Windon’s (a Fast & Furious regular) impressive cinematography and some gorgeously composited CGI—one that predominantly rules the production design through and through. Standing on solid imagination, particularly, is the creation and execution of Yorktown within the universe. Shot in Dubai (and for good reason), the location receives some jaw-dropping visual representation—when watching it, one feels nothing but awe. This and many different places within the film’s narrative are given their respective dues. The creators visually introduce viewers to these environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.

(On a not-so-unrelated note, Sabotage by Beastie Boys—the very single that helped define Kirk’s character in the first one—is propelled to become an almost legitimate character in the film. One could argue against it, citing possible gimmickry in its usage as a justification. The fact that the very presence in the movie emotionally ties a lot of loose ends in Kirk’s character development, however, proves how worthy it truly is. Without spoiling much, I can happily state that there’s nothing but joy to be had come the moment of its arrival).

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

This is where it begins, Captain!

This is where it begins, Captain!

As with the last two films, Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto do not disappoint. However, they’re given a lot more here to dig their teeth into, and boy do they gleefully oblige. Zoe Saldana, (the late) Yelchin, and John Cho, comparatively, don’t have much screen-time, but they don’t feel misplaced. (You’d probably have wanted Uhura to be exploited more as a potential translator than the ultimate trajectory showed, but that’s a minor stickler in a majorly impressive film). Simon Pegg’s not just a funny one here; there’s a lot more to his character—and for good reason. Scotty’s ultimately the glue that binds everyone together, and Pegg doesn’t disappoint. Sofia Boutella is bloody good, and Idris Elba digs right into his multi-dimensional character, rendering a near-perfect output.

WORTH IT?

Star Trek Beyond does what neither of its two predecessors could: space out the spectacle with some much-required heart, and have adrenaline accompanied by jaw-dropping awe. Justin Lin proves himself as a director here, backed by some fantastic writing by Pegg and Jung that successfully fleshes out the very emotional essence of space exploration—the adventure, the excitement, and the childlike wonder—whilst making an unapologetically fun film that warrants the big screen experience.

In short, this is beyond awesome. Just sayin’.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Pine
Simon Pegg
Zachary Quinto
Sofia Boutella
Idris Elba

Written by

Simon Pegg
Doug Jung

Directed by

Justin Lin



WHAT TO EXPECT

There’s a lot many people have to say on J. J. Abrams rebooting Star Trek. Known primarily as the Kelvin-verse, the initial fanfare and critical appreciation gave way to major dislike pouring out, courtesy hardcore Trek enthusiasts. But while most would agree that the first one was a fun—if lacking the requisite emotional depth a film like this desperately needed—big-screen action extravaganza, Star Trek Into Darkness had critics receiving the film positively, with fans doing the complete opposite.

The studios unquestionably needed damage control. Damon Lindelof didn’t return for the sequel, writer duo Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman (The Amazing Spider-Man 2) were replaced conveniently with self-confessed Trek fanboy Simon Pegg and Doug Jung (Confidence). As for Abrams, he’s just a producer here. And while things look rosy, there’s just one teensy bit of skepticism viewers will have of the movie.

Justin Lin directs Star Trek Beyond.

Sure, he’s helmed (some of) the moderately well-received second season of True Detective, but nothing truly beats his reputation as the director of four films from the Fast & Furious franchise, a series of kitschy action blockbusters that made a surprising progression from car-culture to high-octane heists that redefine “over-the-top” as a phrase altogether. It’s not surprising, thus, that there will be questions about the possible quality of the end-product.

I, for one, had very little to build my hopes on, considering solely that my opinions of the previous films within Abrams’s reboot aren’t entirely favorable—this mostly has to do with his overt dependence on spectacle and the irreverent hurry to finish the movie, causing significant harm to possible world building and character evolution. Additionally, in spite of Fast & Furious’s dependance on action made to flabbergast more than anything else, Lin did make sure to bring a flailing franchise gradually back together with Tokyo Drift—one film at a time—and that’s a feat not a lot of us can ignore.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Jim Kirk (Chris Pine) is second-guessing his Captainship and his motivation to continue his explorations aboard the Enterprise. Spock (Zachary Quinto) seems to be fighting his personal inner demons. Both of their internal battles, however, are put on hold when a rescue mission turns into a living, breathing nightmare.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Favorite chairs

Favorite chairs

Let’s get this straight: Star Trek Beyond is a rather well-made action film, and any possible apprehensions on Lin’s execution of the material can safely be laid to rest. Qualitatively even—and I’m going out on a limb here—it’s miles ahead of its last two predecessors for many reasons. Of those responsible, the one that stands out would be Pegg and Jung’s powerful writing.  Most of the rather glaring faults made by Abrams, Orci, and Kurtzman—the shameful lack of character development and world-building, worsened only by their total dependence to spectacle and performances and a strange urgency to get done with every plot point till the credits roll—have been smartly fixed. Through justifiably expository conversation, viewers are able to gain a rather clear perspective on the psyche of Kirk (previously shown to be nothing more than a rebel without a cause), Spock (whose shamefully unexploited half-Vulcan heritage deserved a lot more focus than just a few jarring Spock-loses-it phases thrown in for quasi-multidimensionality), and—surprisingly or unsurprisingly—Montgomery Scott.

The film also introduces us to some brand-new characters—there’s Jaylah, a fierce survivor who’s well-equipped to cause you some serious damage without anybody’s help, and Krall, the undefeated antagonistic force who’ll stop at nothing to get what he wants. Now while the former could almost unanimously be quite a well-defined character, the latter might be subject to polarizing feedback. This, however, is not a flaw, and allow me to explain just why. Pegged mostly as an antagonist, Krall may never have been intended to be so. While the character means harm, his trajectory echoes that of an anti-hero, and the more one thinks of this within the context of the plot, the clearer the intent gets.

The [film’s] creators visually introduce viewers to [its] environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.Ankit Ojha

Look at how BEAUTIFUL Yorktown is!

Look at how BEAUTIFUL Yorktown is!

Sure, the film’s more than occasionally cheesy, but it’s the kind viewers will find delicious enough to have at. And with technical filmmaking so glorious, Star Trek Beyond just ends up being the perfect mixture of heart and spectacle. Watch out for some of the most impressive action set-pieces, prepped by Stephen F. Windon’s (a Fast & Furious regular) impressive cinematography and some gorgeously composited CGI—one that predominantly rules the production design through and through. Standing on solid imagination, particularly, is the creation and execution of Yorktown within the universe. Shot in Dubai (and for good reason), the location receives some jaw-dropping visual representation—when watching it, one feels nothing but awe. This and many different places within the film’s narrative are given their respective dues. The creators visually introduce viewers to these environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.

(On a not-so-unrelated note, Sabotage by Beastie Boys—the very single that helped define Kirk’s character in the first one—is propelled to become an almost legitimate character in the film. One could argue against it, citing possible gimmickry in its usage as a justification. The fact that the very presence in the movie emotionally ties a lot of loose ends in Kirk’s character development, however, proves how worthy it truly is. Without spoiling much, I can happily state that there’s nothing but joy to be had come the moment of its arrival).

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

This is where it begins, Captain!

This is where it begins, Captain!

As with the last two films, Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto do not disappoint. However, they’re given a lot more here to dig their teeth into, and boy do they gleefully oblige. Zoe Saldana, (the late) Yelchin, and John Cho, comparatively, don’t have much screen-time, but they don’t feel misplaced. (You’d probably have wanted Uhura to be exploited more as a potential translator than the ultimate trajectory showed, but that’s a minor stickler in a majorly impressive film). Simon Pegg’s not just a funny one here; there’s a lot more to his character—and for good reason. Scotty’s ultimately the glue that binds everyone together, and Pegg doesn’t disappoint. Sofia Boutella is bloody good, and Idris Elba digs right into his multi-dimensional character, rendering a near-perfect output.

WORTH IT?

Star Trek Beyond does what neither of its two predecessors could: space out the spectacle with some much-required heart, and have adrenaline accompanied by jaw-dropping awe. Justin Lin proves himself as a director here, backed by some fantastic writing by Pegg and Jung that successfully fleshes out the very emotional essence of space exploration—the adventure, the excitement, and the childlike wonder—whilst making an unapologetically fun film that warrants the big screen experience.

In short, this is beyond awesome. Just sayin’.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Chris Pine
Simon Pegg
Sofia Boutella
Director Justin Lin
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

WHAT TO EXPECT

More to explore!

More to explore!

There’s a lot many people have to say on J. J. Abrams rebooting Star Trek. Known primarily as the Kelvin-verse, the initial fanfare and critical appreciation gave way to major dislike pouring out, courtesy hardcore Trek enthusiasts. But while most would agree that the first one was a fun—if lacking the requisite emotional depth a film like this desperately needed—big-screen action extravaganza, Star Trek Into Darkness had critics receiving the film positively, with fans doing the complete opposite.

The studios unquestionably needed damage control. Damon Lindelof didn’t return for the sequel, writer duo Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman (The Amazing Spider-Man 2) were replaced conveniently with self-confessed Trek fanboy Simon Pegg and Doug Jung (Confidence). As for Abrams, he’s just a producer here. And while things look rosy, there’s just one teensy bit of skepticism viewers will have of the movie.

Justin Lin directs Star Trek Beyond.

Sure, he’s helmed (some of) the moderately well-received second season of True Detective, but nothing truly beats his reputation as the director of four films from the Fast & Furious franchise, a series of kitschy action blockbusters that made a surprising progression from car-culture to high-octane heists that redefine “over-the-top” as a phrase altogether. It’s not surprising, thus, that there will be questions about the possible quality of the end-product.

I, for one, had very little to build my hopes on, considering solely that my opinions of the previous films within Abrams’s reboot aren’t entirely favorable—this mostly has to do with his overt dependence on spectacle and the irreverent hurry to finish the movie, causing significant harm to possible world building and character evolution. Additionally, in spite of Fast & Furious’s dependance on action made to flabbergast more than anything else, Lin did make sure to bring a flailing franchise gradually back together with Tokyo Drift—one film at a time—and that’s a feat not a lot of us can ignore.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Jim Kirk (Chris Pine) is second-guessing his Captainship and his motivation to continue his explorations aboard the Enterprise. Spock (Zachary Quinto) seems to be fighting his personal inner demons. Both of their internal battles, however, are put on hold when a rescue mission turns into a living, breathing nightmare.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Favorite chairs

Favorite chairs

Let’s get this straight: Star Trek Beyond is a rather well-made action film, and any possible apprehensions on Lin’s execution of the material can safely be laid to rest. Qualitatively even—and I’m going out on a limb here—it’s miles ahead of its last two predecessors for many reasons. Of those responsible, the one that stands out would be Pegg and Jung’s powerful writing.  Most of the rather glaring faults made by Abrams, Orci, and Kurtzman—the shameful lack of character development and world-building, worsened only by their total dependence to spectacle and performances and a strange urgency to get done with every plot point till the credits roll—have been smartly fixed. Through justifiably expository conversation, viewers are able to gain a rather clear perspective on the psyche of Kirk (previously shown to be nothing more than a rebel without a cause), Spock (whose shamefully unexploited half-Vulcan heritage deserved a lot more focus than just a few jarring Spock-loses-it phases thrown in for quasi-multidimensionality), and—surprisingly or unsurprisingly—Montgomery Scott.

The film also introduces us to some brand-new characters—there’s Jaylah, a fierce survivor who’s well-equipped to cause you some serious damage without anybody’s help, and Krall, the undefeated antagonistic force who’ll stop at nothing to get what he wants. Now while the former could almost unanimously be quite a well-defined character, the latter might be subject to polarizing feedback. This, however, is not a flaw, and allow me to explain just why. Pegged mostly as an antagonist, Krall may never have been intended to be so. While the character means harm, his trajectory echoes that of an anti-hero, and the more one thinks of this within the context of the plot, the clearer the intent gets.

The [film’s] creators visually introduce viewers to [its] environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.Ankit Ojha

Look at how BEAUTIFUL Yorktown is!

Look at how BEAUTIFUL Yorktown is!

Sure, the film’s more than occasionally cheesy, but it’s the kind viewers will find delicious enough to have at. And with technical filmmaking so glorious, Star Trek Beyond just ends up being the perfect mixture of heart and spectacle. Watch out for some of the most impressive action set-pieces, prepped by Stephen F. Windon’s (a Fast & Furious regular) impressive cinematography and some gorgeously composited CGI—one that predominantly rules the production design through and through. Standing on solid imagination, particularly, is the creation and execution of Yorktown within the universe. Shot in Dubai (and for good reason), the location receives some jaw-dropping visual representation—when watching it, one feels nothing but awe. This and many different places within the film’s narrative are given their respective dues. The creators visually introduce viewers to these environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.

(On a not-so-unrelated note, Sabotage by Beastie Boys—the very single that helped define Kirk’s character in the first one—is propelled to become an almost legitimate character in the film. One could argue against it, citing possible gimmickry in its usage as a justification. The fact that the very presence in the movie emotionally ties a lot of loose ends in Kirk’s character development, however, proves how worthy it truly is. Without spoiling much, I can happily state that there’s nothing but joy to be had come the moment of its arrival).

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

This is where it begins, Captain!

This is where it begins, Captain!

As with the last two films, Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto do not disappoint. However, they’re given a lot more here to dig their teeth into, and boy do they gleefully oblige. Zoe Saldana, (the late) Yelchin, and John Cho, comparatively, don’t have much screen-time, but they don’t feel misplaced. (You’d probably have wanted Uhura to be exploited more as a potential translator than the ultimate trajectory showed, but that’s a minor stickler in a majorly impressive film). Simon Pegg’s not just a funny one here; there’s a lot more to his character—and for good reason. Scotty’s ultimately the glue that binds everyone together, and Pegg doesn’t disappoint. Sofia Boutella is bloody good, and Idris Elba digs right into his multi-dimensional character, rendering a near-perfect output.

WORTH IT?

Star Trek Beyond does what neither of its two predecessors could: space out the spectacle with some much-required heart, and have adrenaline accompanied by jaw-dropping awe. Justin Lin proves himself as a director here, backed by some fantastic writing by Pegg and Jung that successfully fleshes out the very emotional essence of space exploration—the adventure, the excitement, and the childlike wonder—whilst making an unapologetically fun film that warrants the big screen experience.

In short, this is beyond awesome. Just sayin’.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Chris Pine
Simon Pegg
Sofia Boutella
Director Justin Lin
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

WHAT TO EXPECT

There’s a lot many people have to say on J. J. Abrams rebooting Star Trek. Known primarily as the Kelvin-verse, the initial fanfare and critical appreciation gave way to major dislike pouring out, courtesy hardcore Trek enthusiasts. But while most would agree that the first one was a fun—if lacking the requisite emotional depth a film like this desperately needed—big-screen action extravaganza, Star Trek Into Darkness had critics receiving the film positively, with fans doing the complete opposite.

The studios unquestionably needed damage control. Damon Lindelof didn’t return for the sequel, writer duo Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman (The Amazing Spider-Man 2) were replaced conveniently with self-confessed Trek fanboy Simon Pegg and Doug Jung (Confidence). As for Abrams, he’s just a producer here. And while things look rosy, there’s just one teensy bit of skepticism viewers will have of the movie.

Justin Lin directs Star Trek Beyond.

Sure, he’s helmed (some of) the moderately well-received second season of True Detective, but nothing truly beats his reputation as the director of four films from the Fast & Furious franchise, a series of kitschy action blockbusters that made a surprising progression from car-culture to high-octane heists that redefine “over-the-top” as a phrase altogether. It’s not surprising, thus, that there will be questions about the possible quality of the end-product.

I, for one, had very little to build my hopes on, considering solely that my opinions of the previous films within Abrams’s reboot aren’t entirely favorable—this mostly has to do with his overt dependence on spectacle and the irreverent hurry to finish the movie, causing significant harm to possible world building and character evolution. Additionally, in spite of Fast & Furious’s dependance on action made to flabbergast more than anything else, Lin did make sure to bring a flailing franchise gradually back together with Tokyo Drift—one film at a time—and that’s a feat not a lot of us can ignore.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Jim Kirk (Chris Pine) is second-guessing his Captainship and his motivation to continue his explorations aboard the Enterprise. Spock (Zachary Quinto) seems to be fighting his personal inner demons. Both of their internal battles, however, are put on hold when a rescue mission turns into a living, breathing nightmare.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Favorite chairs

Let’s get this straight: Star Trek Beyond is a rather well-made action film, and any possible apprehensions on Lin’s execution of the material can safely be laid to rest. Qualitatively even—and I’m going out on a limb here—it’s miles ahead of its last two predecessors for many reasons. Of those responsible, the one that stands out would be Pegg and Jung’s powerful writing.  Most of the rather glaring faults made by Abrams, Orci, and Kurtzman—the shameful lack of character development and world-building, worsened only by their total dependence to spectacle and performances and a strange urgency to get done with every plot point till the credits roll—have been smartly fixed. Through justifiably expository conversation, viewers are able to gain a rather clear perspective on the psyche of Kirk (previously shown to be nothing more than a rebel without a cause), Spock (whose shamefully unexploited half-Vulcan heritage deserved a lot more focus than just a few jarring Spock-loses-it phases thrown in for quasi-multidimensionality), and—surprisingly or unsurprisingly—Montgomery Scott.

The film also introduces us to some brand-new characters—there’s Jaylah, a fierce survivor who’s well-equipped to cause you some serious damage without anybody’s help, and Krall, the undefeated antagonistic force who’ll stop at nothing to get what he wants. Now while the former could almost unanimously be quite a well-defined character, the latter might be subject to polarizing feedback. This, however, is not a flaw, and allow me to explain just why. Pegged mostly as an antagonist, Krall may never have been intended to be so. While the character means harm, his trajectory echoes that of an anti-hero, and the more one thinks of this within the context of the plot, the clearer the intent gets.

The [film’s] creators visually introduce viewers to [its] environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.Ankit Ojha
Look at how BEAUTIFUL Yorktown is!

Sure, the film’s more than occasionally cheesy, but it’s the kind viewers will find delicious enough to have at. And with technical filmmaking so glorious, Star Trek Beyond just ends up being the perfect mixture of heart and spectacle. Watch out for some of the most impressive action set-pieces, prepped by Stephen F. Windon’s (a Fast & Furious regular) impressive cinematography and some gorgeously composited CGI—one that predominantly rules the production design through and through. Standing on solid imagination, particularly, is the creation and execution of Yorktown within the universe. Shot in Dubai (and for good reason), the location receives some jaw-dropping visual representation—when watching it, one feels nothing but awe. This and many different places within the film’s narrative are given their respective dues. The creators visually introduce viewers to these environments and make sure each world-building exercise leaves them gaping.

(On a not-so-unrelated note, Sabotage by Beastie Boys—the very single that helped define Kirk’s character in the first one—is propelled to become an almost legitimate character in the film. One could argue against it, citing possible gimmickry in its usage as a justification. The fact that the very presence in the movie emotionally ties a lot of loose ends in Kirk’s character development, however, proves how worthy it truly is. Without spoiling much, I can happily state that there’s nothing but joy to be had come the moment of its arrival).

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

This is where it begins, Captain!

As with the last two films, Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto do not disappoint. However, they’re given a lot more here to dig their teeth into, and boy do they gleefully oblige. Zoe Saldana, (the late) Yelchin, and John Cho, comparatively, don’t have much screen-time, but they don’t feel misplaced. (You’d probably have wanted Uhura to be exploited more as a potential translator than the ultimate trajectory showed, but that’s a minor stickler in a majorly impressive film). Simon Pegg’s not just a funny one here; there’s a lot more to his character—and for good reason. Scotty’s ultimately the glue that binds everyone together, and Pegg doesn’t disappoint. Sofia Boutella is bloody good, and Idris Elba digs right into his multi-dimensional character, rendering a near-perfect output.

WORTH IT?

Star Trek Beyond does what neither of its two predecessors could: space out the spectacle with some much-required heart, and have adrenaline accompanied by jaw-dropping awe. Justin Lin proves himself as a director here, backed by some fantastic writing by Pegg and Jung that successfully fleshes out the very emotional essence of space exploration—the adventure, the excitement, and the childlike wonder—whilst making an unapologetically fun film that warrants the big screen experience.

In short, this is beyond awesome. Just sayin’.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Share this Post