Star Wars

A towering, exemplary achievement!


Star Wars

  • A towering, exemplary achievement!

Star Wars

  • A towering, exemplary achievement!


AKA

Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope

Rated

PG

Starring

Mark Hamill
Carrie Fisher
Harrison Ford
Alec Guinness
Anthony Daniels

Written by

George Lucas

Directed by

George Lucas



coming up

What to Expect

A very difficult move for me was to have watched Star Wars. And I had a lot of expectations from it, to be very honest.

After all, when someone who hasn’t watched any of the franchise’s films gets to make the confession and receives responses that sound a lot like, “You HAVEN’T watched ANY of the Star Wars films yet? WHAAAAAT?”, you’re pushed enough to re-evaluate your life. This in itself makes you want to oversell the film to yourself.

But that wasn’t the trigger-point for me; no. The real push to take it all back to the ’77 film is when I ended up bumping into the gorgeous trailer of The Force Awakens, the seventh installment in the franchise. There was a certain fascination attached with how far the universe has come forward, and I wanted desperately to know more. Curiosity eventually got the better of me, and I ended up purchasing what is now chronologically known as the fourth episode in this series.

Which is what you’re reading up a review on, so here we go.

What’s it About?

Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill; Kingsman: The Secret Service) lives aimlessly on the desert planet Tatooine. It’s not until his uncle Owen Lars purchases the smuggled droids C-3PO and R2-D2 from Jawa traders that events are set off in motion which will bring Luke to his true calling.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Adrift in Tatooine

Adrift in Tatooine

If we’d have to pick on the slightly hokey visual effects compositing today, we’d probably pick on a lot, especially considering the many changes Lucas felt were important making. But if we leave that aside, we’re going to be surprised at the amount of hard work the visual effects supervisor and his team’s done with the practical effects of the film, which are, quite simply, extraordinary.

But what really gives this space opera an exclusive league of its own is the insane diversity of its themes within just a single film. There’s the coming-of-age, for example, which is quite beautifully integrated within its environment. The (now immensely popular) protagonist of the film needs a calling, and finds one, if only through loss and impending danger.

It is said that everyone, in their trying times, requires a strong support system. The film focuses strongly on Skywalker’s acquisition of an incredible support system through its penultimate moments. “The Force is strong with this one”, Darth Vader claims in his fight against Skywalker’s team of rebels. The Force might superficially be a mythical form of almost-spirituality, that can connect its user to everything organic around it. Strip it down to its raw basics, however, and you’ll ask yourself: if the Force isn’t a symbolic form of support system to its user, then what is?

It is the addition of these elements that make the film a strong one. It’s an action extravaganza, a film about humanity, and a rather impressive (if melodramatic) nod to braving all odds; all at the same time. And it’s done rather well. Add to it John William’s striking score, and you’re bound to get the chills and the feels throughout.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Han. Shot. First.

Han. Shot. First.

A very important part of this film would probably be Harrison Ford’s (Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark) directed interpretation of Han Solo. Solo’s specifics might be to don the role of a are character, but Ford makes sure the classic transition from moral ambiguity to idealism doesn’t include a been-there-done-that angle to it. Solo questions and doubts everything, and one therefore finds his inclusion quite necessary within the confines (or lack thereof) of this film’s universe. Ford is a natural, and plays his part with a very specific aplomb you’ll have to see to believe.

Carrie Fisher plays Princess Leia, who’s the only important female character in the film. Now, while a lacking of the female gender is pretty much in your face, there’s a very important aspect to note here: Leia’s got the guts to do what she wants to, and is incredibly unconventional throughout her runtime in the film’s narrative. She doesn’t fear or cower down to anybody, and – should the time come – is ready to pick up weapons and kick some Empire butt. I enjoyed watching Fisher play the role. Yes, there may definitely be some hesitation to be found in the first fifteen odd minutes of her role’s runtime, but by the film’s second half, we see her take incredible form. And her confidence within this time is simply amazing.

David Prowse does a commendable job as Darth Vader, and although there’s a very specific and (dangerously) consistent role he takes on, there’s a lot viewers would like knowing about him.Vader is voiced strongly by James Earl Jones, who, with fantastic intonation and a certain poise, gives Prowse’s movements a defining stamp. Alec Guinness (Doctor Zhivago) convincingly portrays the classic mentor in Obi-Wan Kenobi, and gives his character a certain warmth and calm that viewers expect spiritual leaders to have, onscreen or off. Anthony Daniels is hilarious as the C-3PO, and Kenny Baker’s contribution to R2-D2 is damn impressive. Of the various creatures, however, if there’s one that fully captures your attention, it’s Chewbacca. Extra brownie points go to Peter Mayhew for playing the Wookie, especially considering how emotionally attached the viewers are prone to get to him in the film.

Worth it?

Star Wars isn’t just a film. Restricting it to the bracket would be then be akin to refusing to scratch the surface for more. This is an experience. It’s, like good friend of mine Bill rightly said of the film when he convinced me to watch it, “magic. You’ll see.”

Well I have. And I can only implore the people who haven’t to do so. It’s a wonderfully crafted, supremely enjoyable film for kids and adults alike. Oh, and it’s also a must watch, if only for just how involving it entirely is.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


AKA

Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope

Rated

PG

Starring

Mark Hamill
Carrie Fisher
Harrison Ford
Alec Guinness
Anthony Daniels

Written by

George Lucas

Directed by

George Lucas



What to Expect

A very difficult move for me was to have watched Star Wars. And I had a lot of expectations from it, to be very honest.

After all, when someone who hasn’t watched any of the franchise’s films gets to make the confession and receives responses that sound a lot like, “You HAVEN’T watched ANY of the Star Wars films yet? WHAAAAAT?”, you’re pushed enough to re-evaluate your life. This in itself makes you want to oversell the film to yourself.

But that wasn’t the trigger-point for me; no. The real push to take it all back to the ’77 film is when I ended up bumping into the gorgeous trailer of The Force Awakens, the seventh installment in the franchise. There was a certain fascination attached with how far the universe has come forward, and I wanted desperately to know more. Curiosity eventually got the better of me, and I ended up purchasing what is now chronologically known as the fourth episode in this series.

Which is what you’re reading up a review on, so here we go.

What’s it About?

Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill; Kingsman: The Secret Service) lives aimlessly on the desert planet Tatooine. It’s not until his uncle Owen Lars purchases the smuggled droids C-3PO and R2-D2 from Jawa traders that events are set off in motion which will bring Luke to his true calling.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Adrift in Tatooine

Adrift in Tatooine

If we’d have to pick on the slightly hokey visual effects compositing today, we’d probably pick on a lot, especially considering the many changes Lucas felt were important making. But if we leave that aside, we’re going to be surprised at the amount of hard work the visual effects supervisor and his team’s done with the practical effects of the film, which are, quite simply, extraordinary.

But what really gives this space opera an exclusive league of its own is the insane diversity of its themes within just a single film. There’s the coming-of-age, for example, which is quite beautifully integrated within its environment. The (now immensely popular) protagonist of the film needs a calling, and finds one, if only through loss and impending danger.

It is said that everyone, in their trying times, requires a strong support system. The film focuses strongly on Skywalker’s acquisition of an incredible support system through its penultimate moments. “The Force is strong with this one”, Darth Vader claims in his fight against Skywalker’s team of rebels. The Force might superficially be a mythical form of almost-spirituality, that can connect its user to everything organic around it. Strip it down to its raw basics, however, and you’ll ask yourself: if the Force isn’t a symbolic form of support system to its user, then what is?

It is the addition of these elements that make the film a strong one. It’s an action extravaganza, a film about humanity, and a rather impressive (if melodramatic) nod to braving all odds; all at the same time. And it’s done rather well. Add to it John William’s striking score, and you’re bound to get the chills and the feels throughout.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Han. Shot. First.

Han. Shot. First.

A very important part of this film would probably be Harrison Ford’s (Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark) directed interpretation of Han Solo. Solo’s specifics might be to don the role of a are character, but Ford makes sure the classic transition from moral ambiguity to idealism doesn’t include a been-there-done-that angle to it. Solo questions and doubts everything, and one therefore finds his inclusion quite necessary within the confines (or lack thereof) of this film’s universe. Ford is a natural, and plays his part with a very specific aplomb you’ll have to see to believe.

Carrie Fisher plays Princess Leia, who’s the only important female character in the film. Now, while a lacking of the female gender is pretty much in your face, there’s a very important aspect to note here: Leia’s got the guts to do what she wants to, and is incredibly unconventional throughout her runtime in the film’s narrative. She doesn’t fear or cower down to anybody, and – should the time come – is ready to pick up weapons and kick some Empire butt. I enjoyed watching Fisher play the role. Yes, there may definitely be some hesitation to be found in the first fifteen odd minutes of her role’s runtime, but by the film’s second half, we see her take incredible form. And her confidence within this time is simply amazing.

David Prowse does a commendable job as Darth Vader, and although there’s a very specific and (dangerously) consistent role he takes on, there’s a lot viewers would like knowing about him.Vader is voiced strongly by James Earl Jones, who, with fantastic intonation and a certain poise, gives Prowse’s movements a defining stamp. Alec Guinness (Doctor Zhivago) convincingly portrays the classic mentor in Obi-Wan Kenobi, and gives his character a certain warmth and calm that viewers expect spiritual leaders to have, onscreen or off. Anthony Daniels is hilarious as the C-3PO, and Kenny Baker’s contribution to R2-D2 is damn impressive. Of the various creatures, however, if there’s one that fully captures your attention, it’s Chewbacca. Extra brownie points go to Peter Mayhew for playing the Wookie, especially considering how emotionally attached the viewers are prone to get to him in the film.

Worth it?

Star Wars isn’t just a film. Restricting it to the bracket would be then be akin to refusing to scratch the surface for more. This is an experience. It’s, like good friend of mine Bill rightly said of the film when he convinced me to watch it, “magic. You’ll see.”

Well I have. And I can only implore the people who haven’t to do so. It’s a wonderfully crafted, supremely enjoyable film for kids and adults alike. Oh, and it’s also a must watch, if only for just how involving it entirely is.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Mark Hamill
Carrie Fisher
Harrison Ford
Director George Lucas
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

What to Expect

In a galaxy, far, far away...

In a galaxy, far, far away…

A very difficult move for me was to have watched Star Wars. And I had a lot of expectations from it, to be very honest.

After all, when someone who hasn’t watched any of the franchise’s films gets to make the confession and receives responses that sound a lot like, “You HAVEN’T watched ANY of the Star Wars films yet? WHAAAAAT?”, you’re pushed enough to re-evaluate your life. This in itself makes you want to oversell the film to yourself.

But that wasn’t the trigger-point for me; no. The real push to take it all back to the ’77 film is when I ended up bumping into the gorgeous trailer of The Force Awakens, the seventh installment in the franchise. There was a certain fascination attached with how far the universe has come forward, and I wanted desperately to know more. Curiosity eventually got the better of me, and I ended up purchasing what is now chronologically known as the fourth episode in this series.

Which is what you’re reading up a review on, so here we go.

What’s it About?

Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill; Kingsman: The Secret Service) lives aimlessly on the desert planet Tatooine. It’s not until his uncle Owen Lars purchases the smuggled droids C-3PO and R2-D2 from Jawa traders that events are set off in motion which will bring Luke to his true calling.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Adrift in Tatooine

Adrift in Tatooine

If we’d have to pick on the slightly hokey visual effects compositing today, we’d probably pick on a lot, especially considering the many changes Lucas felt were important making. But if we leave that aside, we’re going to be surprised at the amount of hard work the visual effects supervisor and his team’s done with the practical effects of the film, which are, quite simply, extraordinary.

But what really gives this space opera an exclusive league of its own is the insane diversity of its themes within just a single film. There’s the coming-of-age, for example, which is quite beautifully integrated within its environment. The (now immensely popular) protagonist of the film needs a calling, and finds one, if only through loss and impending danger.

It is said that everyone, in their trying times, requires a strong support system. The film focuses strongly on Skywalker’s acquisition of an incredible support system through its penultimate moments. “The Force is strong with this one”, Darth Vader claims in his fight against Skywalker’s team of rebels. The Force might superficially be a mythical form of almost-spirituality, that can connect its user to everything organic around it. Strip it down to its raw basics, however, and you’ll ask yourself: if the Force isn’t a symbolic form of support system to its user, then what is?

It is the addition of these elements that make the film a strong one. It’s an action extravaganza, a film about humanity, and a rather impressive (if melodramatic) nod to braving all odds; all at the same time. And it’s done rather well. Add to it John William’s striking score, and you’re bound to get the chills and the feels throughout.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Han. Shot. First.

Han. Shot. First.

A very important part of this film would probably be Harrison Ford’s (Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark) directed interpretation of Han Solo. Solo’s specifics might be to don the role of a are character, but Ford makes sure the classic transition from moral ambiguity to idealism doesn’t include a been-there-done-that angle to it. Solo questions and doubts everything, and one therefore finds his inclusion quite necessary within the confines (or lack thereof) of this film’s universe. Ford is a natural, and plays his part with a very specific aplomb you’ll have to see to believe.

Carrie Fisher plays Princess Leia, who’s the only important female character in the film. Now, while a lacking of the female gender is pretty much in your face, there’s a very important aspect to note here: Leia’s got the guts to do what she wants to, and is incredibly unconventional throughout her runtime in the film’s narrative. She doesn’t fear or cower down to anybody, and – should the time come – is ready to pick up weapons and kick some Empire butt. I enjoyed watching Fisher play the role. Yes, there may definitely be some hesitation to be found in the first fifteen odd minutes of her role’s runtime, but by the film’s second half, we see her take incredible form. And her confidence within this time is simply amazing.

David Prowse does a commendable job as Darth Vader, and although there’s a very specific and (dangerously) consistent role he takes on, there’s a lot viewers would like knowing about him.Vader is voiced strongly by James Earl Jones, who, with fantastic intonation and a certain poise, gives Prowse’s movements a defining stamp. Alec Guinness (Doctor Zhivago) convincingly portrays the classic mentor in Obi-Wan Kenobi, and gives his character a certain warmth and calm that viewers expect spiritual leaders to have, onscreen or off. Anthony Daniels is hilarious as the C-3PO, and Kenny Baker’s contribution to R2-D2 is damn impressive. Of the various creatures, however, if there’s one that fully captures your attention, it’s Chewbacca. Extra brownie points go to Peter Mayhew for playing the Wookie, especially considering how emotionally attached the viewers are prone to get to him in the film.

Worth it?

Star Wars isn’t just a film. Restricting it to the bracket would be then be akin to refusing to scratch the surface for more. This is an experience. It’s, like good friend of mine Bill rightly said of the film when he convinced me to watch it, “magic. You’ll see.”

Well I have. And I can only implore the people who haven’t to do so. It’s a wonderfully crafted, supremely enjoyable film for kids and adults alike. Oh, and it’s also a must watch, if only for just how involving it entirely is.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Mark Hamill
Carrie Fisher
Harrison Ford
Director George Lucas
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

What to Expect

A very difficult move for me was to have watched Star Wars. And I had a lot of expectations from it, to be very honest.

After all, when someone who hasn’t watched any of the franchise’s films gets to make the confession and receives responses that sound a lot like, “You HAVEN’T watched ANY of the Star Wars films yet? WHAAAAAT?”, you’re pushed enough to re-evaluate your life. This in itself makes you want to oversell the film to yourself.

But that wasn’t the trigger-point for me; no. The real push to take it all back to the ’77 film is when I ended up bumping into the gorgeous trailer of The Force Awakens, the seventh installment in the franchise. There was a certain fascination attached with how far the universe has come forward, and I wanted desperately to know more. Curiosity eventually got the better of me, and I ended up purchasing what is now chronologically known as the fourth episode in this series.

Which is what you’re reading up a review on, so here we go.

What’s it About?

Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill; Kingsman: The Secret Service) lives aimlessly on the desert planet Tatooine. It’s not until his uncle Owen Lars purchases the smuggled droids C-3PO and R2-D2 from Jawa traders that events are set off in motion which will bring Luke to his true calling.

Adrift in Tatooine

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

If we’d have to pick on the slightly hokey visual effects compositing today, we’d probably pick on a lot, especially considering the many changes Lucas felt were important making. But if we leave that aside, we’re going to be surprised at the amount of hard work the visual effects supervisor and his team’s done with the practical effects of the film, which are, quite simply, extraordinary.

But what really gives this space opera an exclusive league of its own is the insane diversity of its themes within just a single film. There’s the coming-of-age, for example, which is quite beautifully integrated within its environment. The (now immensely popular) protagonist of the film needs a calling, and finds one, if only through loss and impending danger.

It is said that everyone, in their trying times, requires a strong support system. The film focuses strongly on Skywalker’s acquisition of an incredible support system through its penultimate moments. “The Force is strong with this one”, Darth Vader claims in his fight against Skywalker’s team of rebels. The Force might superficially be a mythical form of almost-spirituality, that can connect its user to everything organic around it. Strip it down to its raw basics, however, and you’ll ask yourself: if the Force isn’t a symbolic form of support system to its user, then what is?

It is the addition of these elements that make the film a strong one. It’s an action extravaganza, a film about humanity, and a rather impressive (if melodramatic) nod to braving all odds; all at the same time. And it’s done rather well. Add to it John William’s striking score, and you’re bound to get the chills and the feels throughout.

Han. Shot. First.

To Perform or Not to Perform

A very important part of this film would probably be Harrison Ford’s (Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark) directed interpretation of Han Solo. Solo’s specifics might be to don the role of a are character, but Ford makes sure the classic transition from moral ambiguity to idealism doesn’t include a been-there-done-that angle to it. Solo questions and doubts everything, and one therefore finds his inclusion quite necessary within the confines (or lack thereof) of this film’s universe. Ford is a natural, and plays his part with a very specific aplomb you’ll have to see to believe.

Carrie Fisher plays Princess Leia, who’s the only important female character in the film. Now, while a lacking of the female gender is pretty much in your face, there’s a very important aspect to note here: Leia’s got the guts to do what she wants to, and is incredibly unconventional throughout her runtime in the film’s narrative. She doesn’t fear or cower down to anybody, and – should the time come – is ready to pick up weapons and kick some Empire butt. I enjoyed watching Fisher play the role. Yes, there may definitely be some hesitation to be found in the first fifteen odd minutes of her role’s runtime, but by the film’s second half, we see her take incredible form. And her confidence within this time is simply amazing.

David Prowse does a commendable job as Darth Vader, and although there’s a very specific and (dangerously) consistent role he takes on, there’s a lot viewers would like knowing about him.Vader is voiced strongly by James Earl Jones, who, with fantastic intonation and a certain poise, gives Prowse’s movements a defining stamp. Alec Guinness (Doctor Zhivago) convincingly portrays the classic mentor in Obi-Wan Kenobi, and gives his character a certain warmth and calm that viewers expect spiritual leaders to have, onscreen or off. Anthony Daniels is hilarious as the C-3PO, and Kenny Baker’s contribution to R2-D2 is damn impressive. Of the various creatures, however, if there’s one that fully captures your attention, it’s Chewbacca. Extra brownie points go to Peter Mayhew for playing the Wookie, especially considering how emotionally attached the viewers are prone to get to him in the film.

Worth it?

Star Wars isn’t just a film. Restricting it to the bracket would be then be akin to refusing to scratch the surface for more. This is an experience. It’s, like good friend of mine Bill rightly said of the film when he convinced me to watch it, “magic. You’ll see.”

Well I have. And I can only implore the people who haven’t to do so. It’s a wonderfully crafted, supremely enjoyable film for kids and adults alike. Oh, and it’s also a must watch, if only for just how involving it entirely is.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Share this Post