The Finest Hours

Of rulebooks and cookie-cutters


The Finest Hours

  • Of rulebooks and cookie-cutters

The Finest Hours

  • Of rulebooks and cookie-cutters


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Pine
Casey Affleck
Eric Bana
Holliday Grainger
Ben Foster

Written by

Scott Silver
Paul Tamasy
Eric Johnson
Casey Sherman
Michael J. Tougias

Directed by

Craig Gillespie



What to Expect

A movie like The Finest Hours was always going to be laced with an old-fashioned narrative—if the trailers didn’t make it clear enough, Disney’s backing itself would plaster its inclusion within the movie. What potential viewers really ask for is whether the content shines.

And this is where Craig Gillespie comes in.

Having been a part of Lars and the Real Girl, Gillespie hasn’t since made a better movie. Sure, his remake of Fright Night was a hell’a fun, but since Lars, the director has stuck mostly to mainstream movies and treatments; not a surprising move, considering the commercial failure of the Gosling starrer.

And with his second Disney collaboration after Million Dollar Arm, people do expect a lot more grit and tension than warmth. It’s only up to the audience to have decided if he delivers. But as a director—as a filmmaker who once made his treatments shine—does he?

What’s it About?

The perfect storm tears a ship into two halves. One half sinks, and the other stays afloat—and will continue to for a few hours, tops. But it’s up to coast guard Bernie (Chris Pine) to rescue them in what looks like the worst weather out on sea ever.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Chris PIne is Bernie Webber and Beau Knapp is Mel Gouthro in Disney's THE FINEST HOURS, a heroic action-thirller based on the extraordinary true story of the most daring rescue in the history of the Coast Guard.

Honor

This movie is adapted from a non-fiction book written by two people to a screenplay by three. And yet, and yet, there doesn’t seem to be anything new in its narrative. Most of the adventure comes from the last thirty minutes of the movie, which not just has an edge-of-your-seat set-piece, but is also supported by an excellent emotional payoff. One definitely wishes, however, to have witnessed a lot more grit than the family-friendly material Disney is known for. Storms are vicious, and The Finest Hours, thus, only scratches the surface of the peril the survivors of the ship are in.

An argument for the movie would be that one should have expected this from a live-action drama by Disney—which is completely true, except for this one tiny little thing: formula. The movie rests so comfortably on the victors of its conquest of the Based On A True Story 101 rulebook, that it doesn’t so far as even attempt to be different. Bernie, the protagonist in peril (you know, the one you’re supposed to root for; the ones who have to save the day by the end of the movie) is thrown a backstory nobody can care enough about, and a love interest with an establishment so fluttery it cannot replicate for authentic psychological attachment when the narrative really needs it.

What the movie desperately wants to bank on by all means possible is the nostalgia of yesteryear movies. And that isn’t a problem at all; it’s just not enough to completely move said movie forward. It, fortunately, is a harmless, tolerable product with gorgeous cinematography and excellent visual effects. Each frame manages to impress in all its glory, and can be truly savored on the big screen, if watched. Layer that in with Cater Burwell’s traditionally composed orchestrations, and viewers are presented with a product that (to be fairly honest) many of them might just fall for.

But that’s the thing. This movie, and the very events it attempts to immortalize on the big screen, had the potential to be so much more than what it already is.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Ray Sybert (Casey Affleck), D. A. Brown (Michael Raymond-James) and the rest of the crew of the SS Pendleton struggle to keep their ship from sinking in Disney's THE FINEST HOURS, the heroic action-thriller presented in Digital 3D(TM) and IMAX (c) 3D based on the extraordinary true story of the most daring rescue in the history of the Coast Guard.

Sacrifice

Chris Pine (Into the Woods) and Casey Affleck (Gone Bany Gone) are amongst the strongest contenders here. They hold the entire movie with all the strength they have. Pine, in particular, dons his character well enough to hold through the entire film realistically. It’s sad, thus, that Bernie doesn’t make more to him than the cookie-cutter subplots. Eric Bana (Hanna) is pretty great, but doesn’t have much to go with. Holliday Grainger is charming, and very, very strong in some of her scenes, but gets bogged down by her character’s stereotype. Josh Stewart (television’s No Ordinary Family) is functional, but of the supporting cast, it’s Ben Foster (Rampart) with minimal dialogue and authentic body language who steals the show.

Worth it?

For the people in it only for the visual artistry, this movie would probably be gold. What discerning viewers would want (you know, those who are always greedy for more), more than anything else, however, would be for Gillespie to go back to his incredibly focussed handling of the narrative of smaller films like Lars. For now, however, we’re treated to a movie that Robert Schwentke left to direct Insurgent instead. But what that really says about the film is a completely different story altogether, so let’s focus on the movie itself.

Heavy-handedly traditional in approach, The Finest Hours simply scratches the surface with its construction. If you’re in the cinemas already, however, then know that you’re going to be treated to a harmless enough product with a rather formulaic build-up, and—quite fortunately, might I add—an excellent payoff, emotionally and drama-wise.

How one wishes (at the risk of indirectly repeating myself) that the film would have been so much more.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Chris Pine
Casey Affleck
Eric Bana
Holliday Grainger
Ben Foster

Written by

Scott Silver
Paul Tamasy
Eric Johnson
Casey Sherman
Michael J. Tougias

Directed by

Craig Gillespie



What to Expect

A movie like The Finest Hours was always going to be laced with an old-fashioned narrative—if the trailers didn’t make it clear enough, Disney’s backing itself would plaster its inclusion within the movie. What potential viewers really ask for is whether the content shines.

And this is where Craig Gillespie comes in.

Having been a part of Lars and the Real Girl, Gillespie hasn’t since made a better movie. Sure, his remake of Fright Night was a hell’a fun, but since Lars, the director has stuck mostly to mainstream movies and treatments; not a surprising move, considering the commercial failure of the Gosling starrer.

And with his second Disney collaboration after Million Dollar Arm, people do expect a lot more grit and tension than warmth. It’s only up to the audience to have decided if he delivers. But as a director—as a filmmaker who once made his treatments shine—does he?

What’s it About?

The perfect storm tears a ship into two halves. One half sinks, and the other stays afloat—and will continue to for a few hours, tops. But it’s up to coast guard Bernie (Chris Pine) to rescue them in what looks like the worst weather out on sea ever.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Chris PIne is Bernie Webber and Beau Knapp is Mel Gouthro in Disney's THE FINEST HOURS, a heroic action-thirller based on the extraordinary true story of the most daring rescue in the history of the Coast Guard.

Honor

This movie is adapted from a non-fiction book written by two people to a screenplay by three. And yet, and yet, there doesn’t seem to be anything new in its narrative. Most of the adventure comes from the last thirty minutes of the movie, which not just has an edge-of-your-seat set-piece, but is also supported by an excellent emotional payoff. One definitely wishes, however, to have witnessed a lot more grit than the family-friendly material Disney is known for. Storms are vicious, and The Finest Hours, thus, only scratches the surface of the peril the survivors of the ship are in.

An argument for the movie would be that one should have expected this from a live-action drama by Disney—which is completely true, except for this one tiny little thing: formula. The movie rests so comfortably on the victors of its conquest of the Based On A True Story 101 rulebook, that it doesn’t so far as even attempt to be different. Bernie, the protagonist in peril (you know, the one you’re supposed to root for; the ones who have to save the day by the end of the movie) is thrown a backstory nobody can care enough about, and a love interest with an establishment so fluttery it cannot replicate for authentic psychological attachment when the narrative really needs it.

What the movie desperately wants to bank on by all means possible is the nostalgia of yesteryear movies. And that isn’t a problem at all; it’s just not enough to completely move said movie forward. It, fortunately, is a harmless, tolerable product with gorgeous cinematography and excellent visual effects. Each frame manages to impress in all its glory, and can be truly savored on the big screen, if watched. Layer that in with Cater Burwell’s traditionally composed orchestrations, and viewers are presented with a product that (to be fairly honest) many of them might just fall for.

But that’s the thing. This movie, and the very events it attempts to immortalize on the big screen, had the potential to be so much more than what it already is.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Ray Sybert (Casey Affleck), D. A. Brown (Michael Raymond-James) and the rest of the crew of the SS Pendleton struggle to keep their ship from sinking in Disney's THE FINEST HOURS, the heroic action-thriller presented in Digital 3D(TM) and IMAX (c) 3D based on the extraordinary true story of the most daring rescue in the history of the Coast Guard.

Sacrifice

Chris Pine (Into the Woods) and Casey Affleck (Gone Bany Gone) are amongst the strongest contenders here. They hold the entire movie with all the strength they have. Pine, in particular, dons his character well enough to hold through the entire film realistically. It’s sad, thus, that Bernie doesn’t make more to him than the cookie-cutter subplots. Eric Bana (Hanna) is pretty great, but doesn’t have much to go with. Holliday Grainger is charming, and very, very strong in some of her scenes, but gets bogged down by her character’s stereotype. Josh Stewart (television’s No Ordinary Family) is functional, but of the supporting cast, it’s Ben Foster (Rampart) with minimal dialogue and authentic body language who steals the show.

Worth it?

For the people in it only for the visual artistry, this movie would probably be gold. What discerning viewers would want (you know, those who are always greedy for more), more than anything else, however, would be for Gillespie to go back to his incredibly focussed handling of the narrative of smaller films like Lars. For now, however, we’re treated to a movie that Robert Schwentke left to direct Insurgent instead. But what that really says about the film is a completely different story altogether, so let’s focus on the movie itself.

Heavy-handedly traditional in approach, The Finest Hours simply scratches the surface with its construction. If you’re in the cinemas already, however, then know that you’re going to be treated to a harmless enough product with a rather formulaic build-up, and—quite fortunately, might I add—an excellent payoff, emotionally and drama-wise.

How one wishes (at the risk of indirectly repeating myself) that the film would have been so much more.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Chris Pine
Casey Affleck
Eric Bana
Director Craig Gillespie
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

The raging storm

The raging storm

A movie like The Finest Hours was always going to be laced with an old-fashioned narrative—if the trailers didn’t make it clear enough, Disney’s backing itself would plaster its inclusion within the movie. What potential viewers really ask for is whether the content shines.

And this is where Craig Gillespie comes in.

Having been a part of Lars and the Real Girl, Gillespie hasn’t since made a better movie. Sure, his remake of Fright Night was a hell’a fun, but since Lars, the director has stuck mostly to mainstream movies and treatments; not a surprising move, considering the commercial failure of the Gosling starrer.

And with his second Disney collaboration after Million Dollar Arm, people do expect a lot more grit and tension than warmth. It’s only up to the audience to have decided if he delivers. But as a director—as a filmmaker who once made his treatments shine—does he?

What’s it About?

The perfect storm tears a ship into two halves. One half sinks, and the other stays afloat—and will continue to for a few hours, tops. But it’s up to coast guard Bernie (Chris Pine) to rescue them in what looks like the worst weather out on sea ever.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Chris PIne is Bernie Webber and Beau Knapp is Mel Gouthro in Disney's THE FINEST HOURS, a heroic action-thirller based on the extraordinary true story of the most daring rescue in the history of the Coast Guard.

Honor

This movie is adapted from a non-fiction book written by two people to a screenplay by three. And yet, and yet, there doesn’t seem to be anything new in its narrative. Most of the adventure comes from the last thirty minutes of the movie, which not just has an edge-of-your-seat set-piece, but is also supported by an excellent emotional payoff. One definitely wishes, however, to have witnessed a lot more grit than the family-friendly material Disney is known for. Storms are vicious, and The Finest Hours, thus, only scratches the surface of the peril the survivors of the ship are in.

An argument for the movie would be that one should have expected this from a live-action drama by Disney—which is completely true, except for this one tiny little thing: formula. The movie rests so comfortably on the victors of its conquest of the Based On A True Story 101 rulebook, that it doesn’t so far as even attempt to be different. Bernie, the protagonist in peril (you know, the one you’re supposed to root for; the ones who have to save the day by the end of the movie) is thrown a backstory nobody can care enough about, and a love interest with an establishment so fluttery it cannot replicate for authentic psychological attachment when the narrative really needs it.

What the movie desperately wants to bank on by all means possible is the nostalgia of yesteryear movies. And that isn’t a problem at all; it’s just not enough to completely move said movie forward. It, fortunately, is a harmless, tolerable product with gorgeous cinematography and excellent visual effects. Each frame manages to impress in all its glory, and can be truly savored on the big screen, if watched. Layer that in with Cater Burwell’s traditionally composed orchestrations, and viewers are presented with a product that (to be fairly honest) many of them might just fall for.

But that’s the thing. This movie, and the very events it attempts to immortalize on the big screen, had the potential to be so much more than what it already is.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Ray Sybert (Casey Affleck), D. A. Brown (Michael Raymond-James) and the rest of the crew of the SS Pendleton struggle to keep their ship from sinking in Disney's THE FINEST HOURS, the heroic action-thriller presented in Digital 3D(TM) and IMAX (c) 3D based on the extraordinary true story of the most daring rescue in the history of the Coast Guard.

Sacrifice

Chris Pine (Into the Woods) and Casey Affleck (Gone Bany Gone) are amongst the strongest contenders here. They hold the entire movie with all the strength they have. Pine, in particular, dons his character well enough to hold through the entire film realistically. It’s sad, thus, that Bernie doesn’t make more to him than the cookie-cutter subplots. Eric Bana (Hanna) is pretty great, but doesn’t have much to go with. Holliday Grainger is charming, and very, very strong in some of her scenes, but gets bogged down by her character’s stereotype. Josh Stewart (television’s No Ordinary Family) is functional, but of the supporting cast, it’s Ben Foster (Rampart) with minimal dialogue and authentic body language who steals the show.

Worth it?

For the people in it only for the visual artistry, this movie would probably be gold. What discerning viewers would want (you know, those who are always greedy for more), more than anything else, however, would be for Gillespie to go back to his incredibly focussed handling of the narrative of smaller films like Lars. For now, however, we’re treated to a movie that Robert Schwentke left to direct Insurgent instead. But what that really says about the film is a completely different story altogether, so let’s focus on the movie itself.

Heavy-handedly traditional in approach, The Finest Hours simply scratches the surface with its construction. If you’re in the cinemas already, however, then know that you’re going to be treated to a harmless enough product with a rather formulaic build-up, and—quite fortunately, might I add—an excellent payoff, emotionally and drama-wise.

How one wishes (at the risk of indirectly repeating myself) that the film would have been so much more.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Chris Pine
Casey Affleck
Eric Bana
Director Craig Gillespie
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

A movie like The Finest Hours was always going to be laced with an old-fashioned narrative—if the trailers didn’t make it clear enough, Disney’s backing itself would plaster its inclusion within the movie. What potential viewers really ask for is whether the content shines.

And this is where Craig Gillespie comes in.

Having been a part of Lars and the Real Girl, Gillespie hasn’t since made a better movie. Sure, his remake of Fright Night was a hell’a fun, but since Lars, the director has stuck mostly to mainstream movies and treatments; not a surprising move, considering the commercial failure of the Gosling starrer.

And with his second Disney collaboration after Million Dollar Arm, people do expect a lot more grit and tension than warmth. It’s only up to the audience to have decided if he delivers. But as a director—as a filmmaker who once made his treatments shine—does he?

What’s it About?

The perfect storm tears a ship into two halves. One half sinks, and the other stays afloat—and will continue to for a few hours, tops. But it’s up to coast guard Bernie (Chris Pine) to rescue them in what looks like the worst weather out on sea ever.

Honor

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

This movie is adapted from a non-fiction book written by two people to a screenplay by three. And yet, and yet, there doesn’t seem to be anything new in its narrative. Most of the adventure comes from the last thirty minutes of the movie, which not just has an edge-of-your-seat set-piece, but is also supported by an excellent emotional payoff. One definitely wishes, however, to have witnessed a lot more grit than the family-friendly material Disney is known for. Storms are vicious, and The Finest Hours, thus, only scratches the surface of the peril the survivors of the ship are in.

An argument for the movie would be that one should have expected this from a live-action drama by Disney—which is completely true, except for this one tiny little thing: formula. The movie rests so comfortably on the victors of its conquest of the Based On A True Story 101 rulebook, that it doesn’t so far as even attempt to be different. Bernie, the protagonist in peril (you know, the one you’re supposed to root for; the ones who have to save the day by the end of the movie) is thrown a backstory nobody can care enough about, and a love interest with an establishment so fluttery it cannot replicate for authentic psychological attachment when the narrative really needs it.

What the movie desperately wants to bank on by all means possible is the nostalgia of yesteryear movies. And that isn’t a problem at all; it’s just not enough to completely move said movie forward. It, fortunately, is a harmless, tolerable product with gorgeous cinematography and excellent visual effects. Each frame manages to impress in all its glory, and can be truly savored on the big screen, if watched. Layer that in with Cater Burwell’s traditionally composed orchestrations, and viewers are presented with a product that (to be fairly honest) many of them might just fall for.

But that’s the thing. This movie, and the very events it attempts to immortalize on the big screen, had the potential to be so much more than what it already is.

Sacrifice

To Perform or Not to Perform

Chris Pine (Into the Woods) and Casey Affleck (Gone Bany Gone) are amongst the strongest contenders here. They hold the entire movie with all the strength they have. Pine, in particular, dons his character well enough to hold through the entire film realistically. It’s sad, thus, that Bernie doesn’t make more to him than the cookie-cutter subplots. Eric Bana (Hanna) is pretty great, but doesn’t have much to go with. Holliday Grainger is charming, and very, very strong in some of her scenes, but gets bogged down by her character’s stereotype. Josh Stewart (television’s No Ordinary Family) is functional, but of the supporting cast, it’s Ben Foster (Rampart) with minimal dialogue and authentic body language who steals the show.

Worth it?

For the people in it only for the visual artistry, this movie would probably be gold. What discerning viewers would want (you know, those who are always greedy for more), more than anything else, however, would be for Gillespie to go back to his incredibly focussed handling of the narrative of smaller films like Lars. For now, however, we’re treated to a movie that Robert Schwentke left to direct Insurgent instead. But what that really says about the film is a completely different story altogether, so let’s focus on the movie itself.

Heavy-handedly traditional in approach, The Finest Hours simply scratches the surface with its construction. If you’re in the cinemas already, however, then know that you’re going to be treated to a harmless enough product with a rather formulaic build-up, and—quite fortunately, might I add—an excellent payoff, emotionally and drama-wise.

How one wishes (at the risk of indirectly repeating myself) that the film would have been so much more.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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