The Lobster

The weird ones always win!


The Lobster

  • The weird ones always win!

The Lobster

  • The weird ones always win!


Rated

N/A

Starring

Colin Farrell
Rachel Weisz
Léa Seydoux
John C. Reilly
Ben Whishaw

Written by

Yorgos Lanthimos
Efthimis Fillipou

Directed by

Yorgos Lanthimos



coming up

What to Expect

The Lobster is practically the kind of film you wouldn’t know what to expect from.A typical first glance you give you stellar names of the likes of Colin Farrell (Phone Booth), Rachel Weisz (The Fountain), and Léa Seydoux (Blue is the Warmest Color), but then you’re on the lookout for the director who’s responsible for such a gorgeous casting coup and you notice the name Yorgos Lanthimos.

I have absolutely no idea who he is; nuh-uh.

Exactly. Nobody knows about the radical Greek director, of those who did may have been prepared enough for the content of the film. Not that it’s a bad thing to be surprised, but as the potential viewer gets to know more about the guy, they’d definitely end up knowing that there’s more to him than just one weird English-language film.

And that’s what matters.

What’s it About?

In an alternate universe in which contains a world, there’s a small place called The City, in which live the couples. If the couples break up, or if one of them dies, the newly single ones are transported to a faraway place called The Hotel. Such is the issue with David (Farrell), who’s presented – as is the rule of this universe – with forty-five days to choose his mate till he’s transformed into an animal of his liking and released into the woods to fend for himself.

I can understand. It’s normal. Take all the time you’d need to process the information, s’il vous plait.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Their Worlds syncing together forever

Their Worlds syncing together forever

Ah, societies.

There’s always something off about the strict rules of each of them, for humans almost never can fit into a singular bracket. That, dear readers, is an irony that may be unwritten, but is still one of the most explored themes in world cinema. Then again, there are many different shades of exploration, and The Lobster is but one very dark shade of a subversively vivid color. Everything seems perfectly normal on the outside — too normal, perhaps, to let its disgustingly dark underbelly pass through.

The humor is vicious, and Lanthimos, in collaboration with Efthimis Fillipou, writes in an assortment of fascinating characters with traits that are not only perfect comedic support, but also have an incredible lot to do within the film. Then again, there is that effortlessly subtle (and transparent, almost) layer of science fiction in the mix, what with the workings of every society justified just right, sans the foreboding feeling of exposition.

But what the writers do best is to make David a rather visual symbol of the passive rebel inside us. Everybody has a rather mediocre name — from The Loner Leader and The Short Sighted Woman to The Limping Man and The Lisping Man, there is but no uniqueness to the names of each character David passes by. His name is the only one that stands out; one that may not be able to describe his personality and his physical traits any more than the weather in the sky to one with no knowledge of meteorology. This rather strongly shows that while transitioning between societies, there’s a shockingly high chance of him having both the attributes of lonesomeness and the desire for companionship. Every society has its own special attributes, but our protagonist seems to have (and want to have) the best of both worlds’ attributes, and is unable to fit into a single bracket. As an audience, that in itself accounts for a high lot of being able to relate. But through it all, the movie also speaks about the act of companionship. Between love, lust and settlement, one ends up losing just how it feels to be attracted to someone who’s just meant to be the person you can literally give parts of yourself up for (watch the film till the rather brilliant ending, and you’ll know what I mean).

That’s not all. As a director too, Lanthimos has an extreme mastery over the execution of his material. An excellent example would be the scenes shot to be rendered in slow-motion. While stylistically fantastic, the very shots and sequences support the additional emotion of finality; the now-or-never of life’s decisions, and the battles one’s forced to take up. Thanks especially to cinematographer Thimios Bakatakis, one’s treated to a visually perfect composition in each frame. The production design adds to the gloss, the rawness and the bland wherever required. Equally brilliant is the film’s absolutely fantastic music, which is almost perfectly able to relay the the emotions of its characters.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The Other Antagonist

The Other Antagonist

Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and Léa Seydoux are the film’s brightly shining stars. While Farrell ably performs as the protagonist, it is Weisz who narrates the entire film and holds it together, and she’s brilliant. Seydoux is an absolute formation of power in this film, and as the audience sees her through, they realize there’s a lot more that needs answering. Within the attributes that intimidate are questions that aren’t answered, and to stand at the edge of those questions in itself is an extremely different job for an actor. She’s an unsurprising talent, and one that will go on for years to come. John C. Reilly is functional, but of the supporting characters, it is Whishaw who gets a meatier, grayer role and performs it with glee. The rest are pretty alright.

Worth it?

This is a film that can simply not be recommended for people looking for a stop-gap weekend stress-buster. There’s a lot of absurdity in this off kilter fantasy romantic dramedy, most of which may not cut ice with the audience. Sit through it all patiently, however, and you’ll see the silver linings of the film coming out through its heavy metaphors, staring right at you. This is an extremely weird film, but also, without a doubt, one of the most well-made ones this year. And while this one isn’t layperson-friendly, I’d rather you gave it a try to see for yourself if you fit within the realms of the film’s chances of lovability.

Because you never know, in your process of choosing the films you watch, you might just be like David.

Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

N/A

Starring

Colin Farrell
Rachel Weisz
Léa Seydoux
John C. Reilly
Ben Whishaw

Written by

Yorgos Lanthimos
Efthimis Fillipou

Directed by

Yorgos Lanthimos



What to Expect

The Lobster is practically the kind of film you wouldn’t know what to expect from.A typical first glance you give you stellar names of the likes of Colin Farrell (Phone Booth), Rachel Weisz (The Fountain), and Léa Seydoux (Blue is the Warmest Color), but then you’re on the lookout for the director who’s responsible for such a gorgeous casting coup and you notice the name Yorgos Lanthimos.

I have absolutely no idea who he is; nuh-uh.

Exactly. Nobody knows about the radical Greek director, of those who did may have been prepared enough for the content of the film. Not that it’s a bad thing to be surprised, but as the potential viewer gets to know more about the guy, they’d definitely end up knowing that there’s more to him than just one weird English-language film.

And that’s what matters.

What’s it About?

In an alternate universe in which contains a world, there’s a small place called The City, in which live the couples. If the couples break up, or if one of them dies, the newly single ones are transported to a faraway place called The Hotel. Such is the issue with David (Farrell), who’s presented – as is the rule of this universe – with forty-five days to choose his mate till he’s transformed into an animal of his liking and released into the woods to fend for himself.

I can understand. It’s normal. Take all the time you’d need to process the information, s’il vous plait.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Their Worlds syncing together forever

Their Worlds syncing together forever

Ah, societies.

There’s always something off about the strict rules of each of them, for humans almost never can fit into a singular bracket. That, dear readers, is an irony that may be unwritten, but is still one of the most explored themes in world cinema. Then again, there are many different shades of exploration, and The Lobster is but one very dark shade of a subversively vivid color. Everything seems perfectly normal on the outside — too normal, perhaps, to let its disgustingly dark underbelly pass through.

The humor is vicious, and Lanthimos, in collaboration with Efthimis Fillipou, writes in an assortment of fascinating characters with traits that are not only perfect comedic support, but also have an incredible lot to do within the film. Then again, there is that effortlessly subtle (and transparent, almost) layer of science fiction in the mix, what with the workings of every society justified just right, sans the foreboding feeling of exposition.

But what the writers do best is to make David a rather visual symbol of the passive rebel inside us. Everybody has a rather mediocre name — from The Loner Leader and The Short Sighted Woman to The Limping Man and The Lisping Man, there is but no uniqueness to the names of each character David passes by. His name is the only one that stands out; one that may not be able to describe his personality and his physical traits any more than the weather in the sky to one with no knowledge of meteorology. This rather strongly shows that while transitioning between societies, there’s a shockingly high chance of him having both the attributes of lonesomeness and the desire for companionship. Every society has its own special attributes, but our protagonist seems to have (and want to have) the best of both worlds’ attributes, and is unable to fit into a single bracket. As an audience, that in itself accounts for a high lot of being able to relate. But through it all, the movie also speaks about the act of companionship. Between love, lust and settlement, one ends up losing just how it feels to be attracted to someone who’s just meant to be the person you can literally give parts of yourself up for (watch the film till the rather brilliant ending, and you’ll know what I mean).

That’s not all. As a director too, Lanthimos has an extreme mastery over the execution of his material. An excellent example would be the scenes shot to be rendered in slow-motion. While stylistically fantastic, the very shots and sequences support the additional emotion of finality; the now-or-never of life’s decisions, and the battles one’s forced to take up. Thanks especially to cinematographer Thimios Bakatakis, one’s treated to a visually perfect composition in each frame. The production design adds to the gloss, the rawness and the bland wherever required. Equally brilliant is the film’s absolutely fantastic music, which is almost perfectly able to relay the the emotions of its characters.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The Other Antagonist

The Other Antagonist

Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and Léa Seydoux are the film’s brightly shining stars. While Farrell ably performs as the protagonist, it is Weisz who narrates the entire film and holds it together, and she’s brilliant. Seydoux is an absolute formation of power in this film, and as the audience sees her through, they realize there’s a lot more that needs answering. Within the attributes that intimidate are questions that aren’t answered, and to stand at the edge of those questions in itself is an extremely different job for an actor. She’s an unsurprising talent, and one that will go on for years to come. John C. Reilly is functional, but of the supporting characters, it is Whishaw who gets a meatier, grayer role and performs it with glee. The rest are pretty alright.

Worth it?

This is a film that can simply not be recommended for people looking for a stop-gap weekend stress-buster. There’s a lot of absurdity in this off kilter fantasy romantic dramedy, most of which may not cut ice with the audience. Sit through it all patiently, however, and you’ll see the silver linings of the film coming out through its heavy metaphors, staring right at you. This is an extremely weird film, but also, without a doubt, one of the most well-made ones this year. And while this one isn’t layperson-friendly, I’d rather you gave it a try to see for yourself if you fit within the realms of the film’s chances of lovability.

Because you never know, in your process of choosing the films you watch, you might just be like David.

Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Colin Farrell
Rachel Weisz
Léa Seydoux
Director  Yorgos Lanthimos
Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League

What to Expect

The Art of Loving an Imaginary Friend

The Art of Loving an Imaginary Friend

The Lobster is practically the kind of film you wouldn’t know what to expect from.A typical first glance you give you stellar names of the likes of Colin Farrell (Phone Booth), Rachel Weisz (The Fountain), and Léa Seydoux (Blue is the Warmest Color), but then you’re on the lookout for the director who’s responsible for such a gorgeous casting coup and you notice the name Yorgos Lanthimos.

I have absolutely no idea who he is; nuh-uh.

Exactly. Nobody knows about the radical Greek director, of those who did may have been prepared enough for the content of the film. Not that it’s a bad thing to be surprised, but as the potential viewer gets to know more about the guy, they’d definitely end up knowing that there’s more to him than just one weird English-language film.

And that’s what matters.

What’s it About?

In an alternate universe in which contains a world, there’s a small place called The City, in which live the couples. If the couples break up, or if one of them dies, the newly single ones are transported to a faraway place called The Hotel. Such is the issue with David (Farrell), who’s presented – as is the rule of this universe – with forty-five days to choose his mate till he’s transformed into an animal of his liking and released into the woods to fend for himself.

I can understand. It’s normal. Take all the time you’d need to process the information, s’il vous plait.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Their Worlds syncing together forever

Their Worlds syncing together forever

Ah, societies.

There’s always something off about the strict rules of each of them, for humans almost never can fit into a singular bracket. That, dear readers, is an irony that may be unwritten, but is still one of the most explored themes in world cinema. Then again, there are many different shades of exploration, and The Lobster is but one very dark shade of a subversively vivid color. Everything seems perfectly normal on the outside — too normal, perhaps, to let its disgustingly dark underbelly pass through.

The humor is vicious, and Lanthimos, in collaboration with Efthimis Fillipou, writes in an assortment of fascinating characters with traits that are not only perfect comedic support, but also have an incredible lot to do within the film. Then again, there is that effortlessly subtle (and transparent, almost) layer of science fiction in the mix, what with the workings of every society justified just right, sans the foreboding feeling of exposition.

But what the writers do best is to make David a rather visual symbol of the passive rebel inside us. Everybody has a rather mediocre name — from The Loner Leader and The Short Sighted Woman to The Limping Man and The Lisping Man, there is but no uniqueness to the names of each character David passes by. His name is the only one that stands out; one that may not be able to describe his personality and his physical traits any more than the weather in the sky to one with no knowledge of meteorology. This rather strongly shows that while transitioning between societies, there’s a shockingly high chance of him having both the attributes of lonesomeness and the desire for companionship. Every society has its own special attributes, but our protagonist seems to have (and want to have) the best of both worlds’ attributes, and is unable to fit into a single bracket. As an audience, that in itself accounts for a high lot of being able to relate. But through it all, the movie also speaks about the act of companionship. Between love, lust and settlement, one ends up losing just how it feels to be attracted to someone who’s just meant to be the person you can literally give parts of yourself up for (watch the film till the rather brilliant ending, and you’ll know what I mean).

That’s not all. As a director too, Lanthimos has an extreme mastery over the execution of his material. An excellent example would be the scenes shot to be rendered in slow-motion. While stylistically fantastic, the very shots and sequences support the additional emotion of finality; the now-or-never of life’s decisions, and the battles one’s forced to take up. Thanks especially to cinematographer Thimios Bakatakis, one’s treated to a visually perfect composition in each frame. The production design adds to the gloss, the rawness and the bland wherever required. Equally brilliant is the film’s absolutely fantastic music, which is almost perfectly able to relay the the emotions of its characters.

To Perform or Not to Perform

The Other Antagonist

The Other Antagonist

Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and Léa Seydoux are the film’s brightly shining stars. While Farrell ably performs as the protagonist, it is Weisz who narrates the entire film and holds it together, and she’s brilliant. Seydoux is an absolute formation of power in this film, and as the audience sees her through, they realize there’s a lot more that needs answering. Within the attributes that intimidate are questions that aren’t answered, and to stand at the edge of those questions in itself is an extremely different job for an actor. She’s an unsurprising talent, and one that will go on for years to come. John C. Reilly is functional, but of the supporting characters, it is Whishaw who gets a meatier, grayer role and performs it with glee. The rest are pretty alright.

Worth it?

This is a film that can simply not be recommended for people looking for a stop-gap weekend stress-buster. There’s a lot of absurdity in this off kilter fantasy romantic dramedy, most of which may not cut ice with the audience. Sit through it all patiently, however, and you’ll see the silver linings of the film coming out through its heavy metaphors, staring right at you. This is an extremely weird film, but also, without a doubt, one of the most well-made ones this year. And while this one isn’t layperson-friendly, I’d rather you gave it a try to see for yourself if you fit within the realms of the film’s chances of lovability.

Because you never know, in your process of choosing the films you watch, you might just be like David.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Colin Farrell
Rachel Weisz
Léa Seydoux
Director  Yorgos Lanthimos
Consensus: 5 Stars
The Elite League

What to Expect

The Lobster is practically the kind of film you wouldn’t know what to expect from.A typical first glance you give you stellar names of the likes of Colin Farrell (Phone Booth), Rachel Weisz (The Fountain), and Léa Seydoux (Blue is the Warmest Color), but then you’re on the lookout for the director who’s responsible for such a gorgeous casting coup and you notice the name Yorgos Lanthimos.

I have absolutely no idea who he is; nuh-uh.

Exactly. Nobody knows about the radical Greek director, of those who did may have been prepared enough for the content of the film. Not that it’s a bad thing to be surprised, but as the potential viewer gets to know more about the guy, they’d definitely end up knowing that there’s more to him than just one weird English-language film.

And that’s what matters.

What’s it About?

In an alternate universe in which contains a world, there’s a small place called The City, in which live the couples. If the couples break up, or if one of them dies, the newly single ones are transported to a faraway place called The Hotel. Such is the issue with David (Farrell), who’s presented – as is the rule of this universe – with forty-five days to choose his mate till he’s transformed into an animal of his liking and released into the woods to fend for himself.

I can understand. It’s normal. Take all the time you’d need to process the information, s’il vous plait.

Their worlds syncing together forever

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Ah, societies.

There’s always something off about the strict rules of each of them, for humans almost never can fit into a singular bracket. That, dear readers, is an irony that may be unwritten, but is still one of the most explored themes in world cinema. Then again, there are many different shades of exploration, and The Lobster is but one very dark shade of a subversively vivid color. Everything seems perfectly normal on the outside — too normal, perhaps, to let its disgustingly dark underbelly pass through.

The humor is vicious, and Lanthimos, in collaboration with Efthimis Fillipou, writes in an assortment of fascinating characters with traits that are not only perfect comedic support, but also have an incredible lot to do within the film. Then again, there is that effortlessly subtle (and transparent, almost) layer of science fiction in the mix, what with the workings of every society justified just right, sans the foreboding feeling of exposition.

But what the writers do best is to make David a rather visual symbol of the passive rebel inside us. Everybody has a rather mediocre name — from The Loner Leader and The Short Sighted Woman to The Limping Man and The Lisping Man, there is but no uniqueness to the names of each character David passes by. His name is the only one that stands out; one that may not be able to describe his personality and his physical traits any more than the weather in the sky to one with no knowledge of meteorology. This rather strongly shows that while transitioning between societies, there’s a shockingly high chance of him having both the attributes of lonesomeness and the desire for companionship. Every society has its own special attributes, but our protagonist seems to have (and want to have) the best of both worlds’ attributes, and is unable to fit into a single bracket. As an audience, that in itself accounts for a high lot of being able to relate. But through it all, the movie also speaks about the act of companionship. Between love, lust and settlement, one ends up losing just how it feels to be attracted to someone who’s just meant to be the person you can literally give parts of yourself up for (watch the film till the rather brilliant ending, and you’ll know what I mean).

That’s not all. As a director too, Lanthimos has an extreme mastery over the execution of his material. An excellent example would be the scenes shot to be rendered in slow-motion. While stylistically fantastic, the very shots and sequences support the additional emotion of finality; the now-or-never of life’s decisions, and the battles one’s forced to take up. Thanks especially to cinematographer Thimios Bakatakis, one’s treated to a visually perfect composition in each frame. The production design adds to the gloss, the rawness and the bland wherever required. Equally brilliant is the film’s absolutely fantastic music, which is almost perfectly able to relay the the emotions of its characters.

The other antagonist

To Perform or Not to Perform

Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and Léa Seydoux are the film’s brightly shining stars. While Farrell ably performs as the protagonist, it is Weisz who narrates the entire film and holds it together, and she’s brilliant. Seydoux is an absolute formation of power in this film, and as the audience sees her through, they realize there’s a lot more that needs answering. Within the attributes that intimidate are questions that aren’t answered, and to stand at the edge of those questions in itself is an extremely different job for an actor. She’s an unsurprising talent, and one that will go on for years to come. John C. Reilly is functional, but of the supporting characters, it is Whishaw who gets a meatier, grayer role and performs it with glee. The rest are pretty alright.

Worth it?

This is a film that can simply not be recommended for people looking for a stop-gap weekend stress-buster. There’s a lot of absurdity in this off kilter fantasy romantic dramedy, most of which may not cut ice with the audience. Sit through it all patiently, however, and you’ll see the silver linings of the film coming out through its heavy metaphors, staring right at you. This is an extremely weird film, but also, without a doubt, one of the most well-made ones this year. And while this one isn’t layperson-friendly, I’d rather you gave it a try to see for yourself if you fit within the realms of the film’s chances of lovability.

Because you never know, in your process of choosing the films you watch, you might just be like David.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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