The Magnificent Seven

‘Meh’gnificent at best


The Magnificent Seven

  • ‘Meh’gnificent at best

The Magnificent Seven

  • ‘Meh’gnificent at best


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Denzel Washington
Vincent D’Onofrio
Chris Pratt
Ethan Hawke
Peter Sarsgaard

Written by

Nic Pizzolatto
Richard Wenk

Directed by

Antoine Fuqua



WHAT TO EXPECT

Training Day was director Antoine Fuqua’s flash in the pan.

Every other movie he’s made after—from Olympus Has Fallen to Southpaw—haven’t been able to touch the pulsating energy his collaboration with writer-director David Ayer ended up becoming. Of the weaker movies, however, the only movie worth a mention, if only for the stylish action set-pieces, has to be The Equalizer.

And the only thing common between Training Day and The Equalizer? Denzel Washington. The Deja Vu actor, whose screen presence in itself is powerful enough to drum up a comme-ci-comme-ca product to remote watchability—films like Man on Fire, Safe House and The Book of Eli are brilliant examples—teams up with Fuqua for what looks like a third time.

Except, things are quite risky here.

The Magnificent Seven is a Western action remake of the 60s film of the same name, which in itself was an English-language remake of Akira Kurosawa’s Shichinin no Samurai (Eng.: Seven Samurai). Reworks in today’s time and age don’t seem to be as trendy as one would think. Fuqua, however, is known to make wildly entertaining films that appeal to the mass audience, which should be a plus for the studios.

That ain’t the question here though. What really matters is if this is a good—or even relevant—film.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Washington) is enlisted by Emma Cullen to help get rid of industrialist Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard; Garden State) who has taken over her village Rose Creek, terrorizing its residents and killing people who defy him. Chisolm hires six others to help him out—gambler Josh Farraday (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), outlaw Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo), sharpshooter Goodnight Robicheaux (Ethan Hawke; Boyhood) and his partner Billy Rocks (Byung-hun Lee; G. I. Joe: Retaliation), Comanche warrior Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier) and tracker Jack Horne (Vincent D’Onofrio; The Judge). Together, they attempt to bring the village together to fight for their rights.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

DAYUM DAT SWAG THO

DAYUM DAT SWAG THO

Let’s put this on the table outright: The Magnificent Seven doesn’t exactly deserve to exist. The film joins a long line of irrelevant and gratuitous reboots and remakes that are created for a single reason: to strike gold at the box office. And if we’re to give credit to what’s due, there’s a lot going in its favor. The screen presence of Washington and Pratt (more on that later), the stupendous cinematography that pulsates in its commendable action set-pieces—the camera movements further the urgency of the in-film universe’s situation—and the impressive production design are enough to take you right back to the late 1800s.

[…] it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now.Ankit Ojha

But then the overall quality begins to unravel, strategically almost. The background score feels like one straight out of your favorite 90s blockbuster action film—a huge misfire, if I may. The music has the power to move audiences in the most simplistic of scenes, but the tonal mismatch we’re served here is shocking, and almost seems to grate on you halfway in. Edit and narrative decisions go hand-in-hand to tribute the Western trademarks, and an incredible scene mid-film ramps up tension like nothing else in its 133 minute runtime could. The climactic action set-piece is overlong, and culminates to an almost predictable end. And if that’s not enough, there’s spotty CGI toward the third act that morphs into an unstoppable mess by its epilogue.

But what really ruins the film is its writing. Almost the entire film runs on a redundant loop of tragedy-style-catchphrase-humor-fun. Sure, an argument can be made on how the loop accurately reflects the “wholesome nature” of Western films, but it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now. Nic Pizzolatto (HBO series True Detective), who obviously seems a lot more comfortable with long-form, episodic formats, teams up with The Equalizer’s Richard Wenk to create a screenplay so middling it fizzles out quicker than one’d think.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Man on FIYAH

Man on FIYAH

And if that’s not enough, you’re presented with cookie-cutter characters, most of whom don’t exactly evolve as much by the end of the film—except, of course, for Hawke’s Goodnight, who goes through his own struggle with his demons. And his performance is, without a doubt, aces. Of course, viewer’s aren’t here to watch him.

They’re here for Denzel Washington, who takes forward a character dependent only on style and pizzazz to move forward. Fortunately, Washington pulls it off and exhibits a certain fervor that is ever consistent—the only reason a character arc as flat as his works. Hawke aside, the only other person viewers will feel an inch for would be Chris Pratt. He’s absolute fun throughout, though his Chris-Prattishness keeps seeping in, ruining the flow. Throw Haley Bennett and Vincent D’Onofrio into the mix as well. They commendably push forth their redundant roles and give out impressive performances. Everyone else, from Byung-hun Lee to Martin Sensmeier just exist as props. Peter Sarsgaard is a bad dude and snarls like a bad dude. Matt Bomer seems to be doing the same thing he did in Andrew Niccol’s In Time (or every other movie): allow his character to self-destruct and leave, grabbing his pay along the way. It’s almost like you’d wonder where the charming, complex conman from television’s White Collar disappeared.

WORTH IT?

It ain’t a bad film by any means, if we’re to break it down. It’s well-shot and well-acted, allowing its viewers to sit it out. That, however, is not enough when you look at just how many missteps it makes, and how lax it is as a moviemaking attempt. The Magnificent Seven, at the end, aims to be nothing more than a vaguely serviceable studio product that seems keen enough to mooch off its legacy—in itself a dubious one at best—and Washington’s star power. It’s an irrelevant and irreverent film that simply begs the question: why must it exist?

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Denzel Washington
Vincent D’Onofrio
Chris Pratt
Ethan Hawke
Peter Sarsgaard

Written by

Nic Pizzolatto
Richard Wenk

Directed by

Antoine Fuqua



WHAT TO EXPECT

Training Day was director Antoine Fuqua’s flash in the pan.

Every other movie he’s made after—from Olympus Has Fallen to Southpaw—haven’t been able to touch the pulsating energy his collaboration with writer-director David Ayer ended up becoming. Of the weaker movies, however, the only movie worth a mention, if only for the stylish action set-pieces, has to be The Equalizer.

And the only thing common between Training Day and The Equalizer? Denzel Washington. The Deja Vu actor, whose screen presence in itself is powerful enough to drum up a comme-ci-comme-ca product to remote watchability—films like Man on Fire, Safe House and The Book of Eli are brilliant examples—teams up with Fuqua for what looks like a third time.

Except, things are quite risky here.

The Magnificent Seven is a Western action remake of the 60s film of the same name, which in itself was an English-language remake of Akira Kurosawa’s Shichinin no Samurai (Eng.: Seven Samurai). Reworks in today’s time and age don’t seem to be as trendy as one would think. Fuqua, however, is known to make wildly entertaining films that appeal to the mass audience, which should be a plus for the studios.

That ain’t the question here though. What really matters is if this is a good—or even relevant—film.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Washington) is enlisted by Emma Cullen to help get rid of industrialist Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard; Garden State) who has taken over her village Rose Creek, terrorizing its residents and killing people who defy him. Chisolm hires six others to help him out—gambler Josh Farraday (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), outlaw Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo), sharpshooter Goodnight Robicheaux (Ethan Hawke; Boyhood) and his partner Billy Rocks (Byung-hun Lee; G. I. Joe: Retaliation), Comanche warrior Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier) and tracker Jack Horne (Vincent D’Onofrio; The Judge). Together, they attempt to bring the village together to fight for their rights.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

DAYUM DAT SWAG THO

DAYUM DAT SWAG THO

Let’s put this on the table outright: The Magnificent Seven doesn’t exactly deserve to exist. The film joins a long line of irrelevant and gratuitous reboots and remakes that are created for a single reason: to strike gold at the box office. And if we’re to give credit to what’s due, there’s a lot going in its favor. The screen presence of Washington and Pratt (more on that later), the stupendous cinematography that pulsates in its commendable action set-pieces—the camera movements further the urgency of the in-film universe’s situation—and the impressive production design are enough to take you right back to the late 1800s.

[…] it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now.Ankit Ojha

But then the overall quality begins to unravel, strategically almost. The background score feels like one straight out of your favorite 90s blockbuster action film—a huge misfire, if I may. The music has the power to move audiences in the most simplistic of scenes, but the tonal mismatch we’re served here is shocking, and almost seems to grate on you halfway in. Edit and narrative decisions go hand-in-hand to tribute the Western trademarks, and an incredible scene mid-film ramps up tension like nothing else in its 133 minute runtime could. The climactic action set-piece is overlong, and culminates to an almost predictable end. And if that’s not enough, there’s spotty CGI toward the third act that morphs into an unstoppable mess by its epilogue.

But what really ruins the film is its writing. Almost the entire film runs on a redundant loop of tragedy-style-catchphrase-humor-fun. Sure, an argument can be made on how the loop accurately reflects the “wholesome nature” of Western films, but it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now. Nic Pizzolatto (HBO series True Detective), who obviously seems a lot more comfortable with long-form, episodic formats, teams up with The Equalizer’s Richard Wenk to create a screenplay so middling it fizzles out quicker than one’d think.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Man on FIYAH

Man on FIYAH

And if that’s not enough, you’re presented with cookie-cutter characters, most of whom don’t exactly evolve as much by the end of the film—except, of course, for Hawke’s Goodnight, who goes through his own struggle with his demons. And his performance is, without a doubt, aces. Of course, viewer’s aren’t here to watch him.

They’re here for Denzel Washington, who takes forward a character dependent only on style and pizzazz to move forward. Fortunately, Washington pulls it off and exhibits a certain fervor that is ever consistent—the only reason a character arc as flat as his works. Hawke aside, the only other person viewers will feel an inch for would be Chris Pratt. He’s absolute fun throughout, though his Chris-Prattishness keeps seeping in, ruining the flow. Throw Haley Bennett and Vincent D’Onofrio into the mix as well. They commendably push forth their redundant roles and give out impressive performances. Everyone else, from Byung-hun Lee to Martin Sensmeier just exist as props. Peter Sarsgaard is a bad dude and snarls like a bad dude. Matt Bomer seems to be doing the same thing he did in Andrew Niccol’s In Time (or every other movie): allow his character to self-destruct and leave, grabbing his pay along the way. It’s almost like you’d wonder where the charming, complex conman from television’s White Collar disappeared.

WORTH IT?

It ain’t a bad film by any means, if we’re to break it down. It’s well-shot and well-acted, allowing its viewers to sit it out. That, however, is not enough when you look at just how many missteps it makes, and how lax it is as a moviemaking attempt. The Magnificent Seven, at the end, aims to be nothing more than a vaguely serviceable studio product that seems keen enough to mooch off its legacy—in itself a dubious one at best—and Washington’s star power. It’s an irrelevant and irreverent film that simply begs the question: why must it exist?

Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Denzel Washington
Chris Pratt
Ethan Hawke
Director Antoine Fuqua
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

WHAT TO EXPECT

Magnificent? Er...

Magnificent? Er…

Training Day was director Antoine Fuqua’s flash in the pan.

Every other movie he’s made after—from Olympus Has Fallen to Southpaw—haven’t been able to touch the pulsating energy his collaboration with writer-director David Ayer ended up becoming. Of the weaker movies, however, the only movie worth a mention, if only for the stylish action set-pieces, has to be The Equalizer.

And the only thing common between Training Day and The Equalizer? Denzel Washington. The Deja Vu actor, whose screen presence in itself is powerful enough to drum up a comme-ci-comme-ca product to remote watchability—films like Man on Fire, Safe House and The Book of Eli are brilliant examples—teams up with Fuqua for what looks like a third time.

Except, things are quite risky here.

The Magnificent Seven is a Western action remake of the 60s film of the same name, which in itself was an English-language remake of Akira Kurosawa’s Shichinin no Samurai (Eng.: Seven Samurai). Reworks in today’s time and age don’t seem to be as trendy as one would think. Fuqua, however, is known to make wildly entertaining films that appeal to the mass audience, which should be a plus for the studios.

That ain’t the question here though. What really matters is if this is a good—or even relevant—film.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Washington) is enlisted by Emma Cullen to help get rid of industrialist Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard; Garden State) who has taken over her village Rose Creek, terrorizing its residents and killing people who defy him. Chisolm hires six others to help him out—gambler Josh Farraday (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), outlaw Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo), sharpshooter Goodnight Robicheaux (Ethan Hawke; Boyhood) and his partner Billy Rocks (Byung-hun Lee; G. I. Joe: Retaliation), Comanche warrior Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier) and tracker Jack Horne (Vincent D’Onofrio; The Judge). Together, they attempt to bring the village together to fight for their rights.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

DAYUM DAT SWAG THO

DAYUM DAT SWAG THO

Let’s put this on the table outright: The Magnificent Seven doesn’t exactly deserve to exist. The film joins a long line of irrelevant and gratuitous reboots and remakes that are created for a single reason: to strike gold at the box office. And if we’re to give credit to what’s due, there’s a lot going in its favor. The screen presence of Washington and Pratt (more on that later), the stupendous cinematography that pulsates in its commendable action set-pieces—the camera movements further the urgency of the in-film universe’s situation—and the impressive production design are enough to take you right back to the late 1800s.

[…] it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now.Ankit Ojha

But then the overall quality begins to unravel, strategically almost. The background score feels like one straight out of your favorite 90s blockbuster action film—a huge misfire, if I may. The music has the power to move audiences in the most simplistic of scenes, but the tonal mismatch we’re served here is shocking, and almost seems to grate on you halfway in. Edit and narrative decisions go hand-in-hand to tribute the Western trademarks, and an incredible scene mid-film ramps up tension like nothing else in its 133 minute runtime could. The climactic action set-piece is overlong, and culminates to an almost predictable end. And if that’s not enough, there’s spotty CGI toward the third act that morphs into an unstoppable mess by its epilogue.

But what really ruins the film is its writing. Almost the entire film runs on a redundant loop of tragedy-style-catchphrase-humor-fun. Sure, an argument can be made on how the loop accurately reflects the “wholesome nature” of Western films, but it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now. Nic Pizzolatto (HBO series True Detective), who obviously seems a lot more comfortable with long-form, episodic formats, teams up with The Equalizer’s Richard Wenk to create a screenplay so middling it fizzles out quicker than one’d think.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Man on FIYAH

Man on FIYAH

And if that’s not enough, you’re presented with cookie-cutter characters, most of whom don’t exactly evolve as much by the end of the film—except, of course, for Hawke’s Goodnight, who goes through his own struggle with his demons. And his performance is, without a doubt, aces. Of course, viewer’s aren’t here to watch him.

They’re here for Denzel Washington, who takes forward a character dependent only on style and pizzazz to move forward. Fortunately, Washington pulls it off and exhibits a certain fervor that is ever consistent—the only reason a character arc as flat as his works. Hawke aside, the only other person viewers will feel an inch for would be Chris Pratt. He’s absolute fun throughout, though his Chris-Prattishness keeps seeping in, ruining the flow. Throw Haley Bennett and Vincent D’Onofrio into the mix as well. They commendably push forth their redundant roles and give out impressive performances. Everyone else, from Byung-hun Lee to Martin Sensmeier just exist as props. Peter Sarsgaard is a bad dude and snarls like a bad dude. Matt Bomer seems to be doing the same thing he did in Andrew Niccol’s In Time (or every other movie): allow his character to self-destruct and leave, grabbing his pay along the way. It’s almost like you’d wonder where the charming, complex conman from television’s White Collar disappeared.

WORTH IT?

It ain’t a bad film by any means, if we’re to break it down. It’s well-shot and well-acted, allowing its viewers to sit it out. That, however, is not enough when you look at just how many missteps it makes, and how lax it is as a moviemaking attempt. The Magnificent Seven, at the end, aims to be nothing more than a vaguely serviceable studio product that seems keen enough to mooch off its legacy—in itself a dubious one at best—and Washington’s star power. It’s an irrelevant and irreverent film that simply begs the question: why must it exist?

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Denzel Washington
Chris Pratt
Ethan Hawke
Director Antoine Fuqua
Consensus: 2 Stars
Meh!

WHAT TO EXPECT

Training Day was director Antoine Fuqua’s flash in the pan.

Every other movie he’s made after—from Olympus Has Fallen to Southpaw—haven’t been able to touch the pulsating energy his collaboration with writer-director David Ayer ended up becoming. Of the weaker movies, however, the only movie worth a mention, if only for the stylish action set-pieces, has to be The Equalizer.

And the only thing common between Training Day and The Equalizer? Denzel Washington. The Deja Vu actor, whose screen presence in itself is powerful enough to drum up a comme-ci-comme-ca product to remote watchability—films like Man on Fire, Safe House and The Book of Eli are brilliant examples—teams up with Fuqua for what looks like a third time.

Except, things are quite risky here.

The Magnificent Seven is a Western action remake of the 60s film of the same name, which in itself was an English-language remake of Akira Kurosawa’s Shichinin no Samurai (Eng.: Seven Samurai). Reworks in today’s time and age don’t seem to be as trendy as one would think. Fuqua, however, is known to make wildly entertaining films that appeal to the mass audience, which should be a plus for the studios.

That ain’t the question here though. What really matters is if this is a good—or even relevant—film.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Washington) is enlisted by Emma Cullen to help get rid of industrialist Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard; Garden State) who has taken over her village Rose Creek, terrorizing its residents and killing people who defy him. Chisolm hires six others to help him out—gambler Josh Farraday (Chris Pratt; Guardians of the Galaxy), outlaw Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo), sharpshooter Goodnight Robicheaux (Ethan Hawke; Boyhood) and his partner Billy Rocks (Byung-hun Lee; G. I. Joe: Retaliation), Comanche warrior Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier) and tracker Jack Horne (Vincent D’Onofrio; The Judge). Together, they attempt to bring the village together to fight for their rights.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

DAYUM DAT SWAG THO

Let’s put this on the table outright: The Magnificent Seven doesn’t exactly deserve to exist. The film joins a long line of irrelevant and gratuitous reboots and remakes that are created for a single reason: to strike gold at the box office. And if we’re to give credit to what’s due, there’s a lot going in its favor. The screen presence of Washington and Pratt (more on that later), the stupendous cinematography that pulsates in its commendable action set-pieces—the camera movements further the urgency of the in-film universe’s situation—and the impressive production design are enough to take you right back to the late 1800s.

[…] it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now.Ankit Ojha

But then the overall quality begins to unravel, strategically almost. The background score feels like one straight out of your favorite 90s blockbuster action film—a huge misfire, if I may. The music has the power to move audiences in the most simplistic of scenes, but the tonal mismatch we’re served here is shocking, and almost seems to grate on you halfway in. Edit and narrative decisions go hand-in-hand to tribute the Western trademarks, and an incredible scene mid-film ramps up tension like nothing else in its 133 minute runtime could. The climactic action set-piece is overlong, and culminates to an almost predictable end. And if that’s not enough, there’s spotty CGI toward the third act that morphs into an unstoppable mess by its epilogue.

But what really ruins the film is its writing. Almost the entire film runs on a redundant loop of tragedy-style-catchphrase-humor-fun. Sure, an argument can be made on how the loop accurately reflects the “wholesome nature” of Western films, but it isn’t necessary for narrative techniques that were successful then to work now. Nic Pizzolatto (HBO series True Detective), who obviously seems a lot more comfortable with long-form, episodic formats, teams up with The Equalizer’s Richard Wenk to create a screenplay so middling it fizzles out quicker than one’d think.

TO PERFORM OR NOT TO PERFORM

Man on FIYAH

And if that’s not enough, you’re presented with cookie-cutter characters, most of whom don’t exactly evolve as much by the end of the film—except, of course, for Hawke’s Goodnight, who goes through his own struggle with his demons. And his performance is, without a doubt, aces. Of course, viewer’s aren’t here to watch him.

They’re here for Denzel Washington, who takes forward a character dependent only on style and pizzazz to move forward. Fortunately, Washington pulls it off and exhibits a certain fervor that is ever consistent—the only reason a character arc as flat as his works. Hawke aside, the only other person viewers will feel an inch for would be Chris Pratt. He’s absolute fun throughout, though his Chris-Prattishness keeps seeping in, ruining the flow. Throw Haley Bennett and Vincent D’Onofrio into the mix as well. They commendably push forth their redundant roles and give out impressive performances. Everyone else, from Byung-hun Lee to Martin Sensmeier just exist as props. Peter Sarsgaard is a bad dude and snarls like a bad dude. Matt Bomer seems to be doing the same thing he did in Andrew Niccol’s In Time (or every other movie): allow his character to self-destruct and leave, grabbing his pay along the way. It’s almost like you’d wonder where the charming, complex conman from television’s White Collar disappeared.

WORTH IT?

It ain’t a bad film by any means, if we’re to break it down. It’s well-shot and well-acted, allowing its viewers to sit it out. That, however, is not enough when you look at just how many missteps it makes, and how lax it is as a moviemaking attempt. The Magnificent Seven, at the end, aims to be nothing more than a vaguely serviceable studio product that seems keen enough to mooch off its legacy—in itself a dubious one at best—and Washington’s star power. It’s an irrelevant and irreverent film that simply begs the question: why must it exist?

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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