The Martian

So great; so much fun!


The Martian

  • So great; so much fun!

The Martian

  • So great; so much fun!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Matt Damon
Jessica Chastain
Jeff Daniels
Sean Bean
Chiwetel Ejiofor

Written by

Drew Goddard
Andy Weir (novel)

Directed by

Ridley Scott



coming up

What to Expect

I loved The Counselor.

Call it howsoever terrible you’d like, but I probably loved the film more than anything else I had seen within the year – and mostly ‘cause I understood the film for what it was more than anyone. The movie was Ridley Scott’s original return back to form, and you’d probably have to get the director and his collaboration with McCarthy properly and give it a fair chance to understand why the two of them intended to do this project. (Try the unrated extended cut that’s roughly twenty minutes longer than its theatrical counterpart for a better understanding of the medium of storytelling the collaborators have decided to break).

What I didn’t love, however, was Scott’s own Prometheus. With threads that have a potential of linking to a timeline well before the Alien universe, this was a strong looking film that ended up being plenty flawed, and heavily reliant on its looks than anything else. It had a great world, and great plot devices, but none of that really cut the ice on the whole. I cannot deny, however, that the movie was an absolutely entrancing experience when I first watched it.

And let’s not even begin with Exodus: Gods and Kings. Ugh.

This is why The Martian. This is specifically why. I desperately wanted Ridley Scott to make a science-fiction film that brought the viewers back to appreciating just how great the guy is at his craft. And I half-knew that The Martian may as well have been it. A simple reason I ended up halting the Andy Weir novel that was the source material for this film was primarily because I wanted this movie to be an unparalleled experience.

And this despite the novel having one of the best openers of the century (not kidding).

I placed all my bets on this one. For Scott. For Damon. For everything this film was to me for me to want to love it. And I was in constant fear of this film having the potential of disappointing me on my viewing of it.

What’s it About?

Mark Watney (Matt Damon; the Bourne franchise) is left behind on Mars while on a mission, declared dead according to some pretty rational calculations.

Yeah, he’s not. And now he’s alone, and has to figure out how to make his living on Mars, whilst also trying to get in touch with the people on Earth to let him know that – well – he’s not dead and he needs to get back.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Lone Survivor

Lone Survivor

So ordinarily when I watch science-fiction movies these days, I get really nervous, because of – you know – obvious reasons. Most sci-fi films usually take the same absolutely humorless route; pepper that with your absolute-wonder trope and fill it with dangerous consequences that our space travelers have to fight and return back home safely, and you’re kinda done with your set of ordinary sci-fi space travel tropes.

Ridley Scott, however, has always given science fiction a very generous, distinguished leap forward. His involvement in franchise starters like Alien and the classic Blade Runner have always been things people have talked about for years and years. The quality of his films of late (Kingdom of Heaven, and most definitely Prometheus), however, haven’t given me enough fodder from his otherwise highly talented self.

(And no, I already spoke about The Counselor, which was one of the very few recent Scott films I loved.)

But really, wait a strong second there. Because The Martian is really all about Ridley Scott getting back to just some strong visual storytelling. Now while Weir’s basic story is pretty simplistic and doesn’t necessarily have Scott’s usual brand of layering it with plot-points and subplots when it comes to the genre, this is very much Scott’s film. His attention to detail, and more so his absolute craft of allowing you to see the bigger picture here comes very, very handy. The gorgeousness of the overall production design is given the extremely skilled collaborative hand of cinematographer Dariusz Wolski, for whom this is the fourth film with Scott. This is probably why most of the extremely wide, landscape shots remind you of the visual strength of Prometheus in bits and pieces. And it mostly also helps Scott immensely in his attempts to show how insignificant the film’s protagonist Watney looks in the wider spectrum of things. In an almost barren wasteland of a planet, you’re made to see how Watney is inexplicably alone in the entire scheme of things. You’re made to understand, through the minds of Scott and Wolski, that Watney’s smarts and willpower are the only thing helping him out in his dire situation.

In short, you understand the urgency that’s very accurately captured here.

But that’s not the only thing that grabs you and pulls you right in. The Martian’s almost-flawless 3D rendering gives you a very distinct feeling of witnessing things from a window. Add to that Wolski’s very distinct hand at lensing and there are many scenes where you feel – and especially in aerial shots – that the immovable mountains are filled with a certain life, subtly metamorphosing; shapeshifting almost, as the camera moves past them. Mix that in with a very Guardians of the Galaxy-esque music compilation and you have with you the talents of an excellent music supervisor. Of course, there’s the strong hand of composer Harry Gregson-Williams – another regular on Scott’s films in the music department. And how can one even forget the color grading and visual effects compositing here? Gosh, the film is supported by some of the most gorgeous skies ever. You can agree when Damon’s Watney talks about looking at “the horizon.” Really.

To Perform or Not to Perform

He is pretty much awesome. That is my considered opinion. Awesome.

He is pretty much awesome. That is my considered opinion. Awesome.

I haven’t seen Matt Damon in the picture for a long time now (yes, except for a highly similar character type in a very prominent movie last year), and so for me this was the film I was really waiting for. And damn. This is Damon literally being back in action. There’s the distinct passive aggressiveness that Damon’s character needs and the fact that he pulls it off apart from doing the usual rounds of survival makes the film even more entertaining. Jessica Chastain is awesome. She’s just awesome. She isn’t in the film for long enough, but she lends enough presence to bring her character some heft. Jeff Daniels does his usual cocky self and excels at it. Sean Bean is in a relatively tamer role here. Kristen Wiig and Chiwetel Ejiofor lend strong support, with Ejiofor pulling off some really subtle humor in some of the film’s trying times to break the intensity. And boy does he have timing! Kate Mara is great, and Michael Pena as usual makes complete use of his presence in the film. He’s just awesome. And then there’s Sebastian Stan in a slightly understated role, which he functions well in. The one who really steals the show among a slew of supporting performers here, however, is Donald Glover, who takes the very aspect of comedic timing by storm with simply his pokerface for support.

Worth it?

The Martian might have an extremely linear story, but with Ridley Scott’s strong direction and Weir’s source material calling for that amazingly passive-aggressive humor, which reflects on-screen in an absolutely badass manner, rest assured this definitely ends up being one of the most entertaining experiences this year in mainstream cinema. There’s equal amounts of shock, awe, laughter and thrill to be found in this gorgeous looking adaptation of a book that I definitely feel the need to complete now that I’ve watched the film. And there’s also Ridley Scott back in strong form! Hot damn!

No really, please watch it. It’s so great I can’t contain my excitement on it anymore. It’s like I could feel the depths of my heart grinning the widest it could ever grin. It’s THAT awesome.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Matt Damon
Jessica Chastain
Jeff Daniels
Sean Bean
Chiwetel Ejiofor

Written by

Drew Goddard
Andy Weir (novel)

Directed by

Ridley Scott



What to Expect

I loved The Counselor.

Call it howsoever terrible you’d like, but I probably loved the film more than anything else I had seen within the year – and mostly ‘cause I understood the film for what it was more than anyone. The movie was Ridley Scott’s original return back to form, and you’d probably have to get the director and his collaboration with McCarthy properly and give it a fair chance to understand why the two of them intended to do this project. (Try the unrated extended cut that’s roughly twenty minutes longer than its theatrical counterpart for a better understanding of the medium of storytelling the collaborators have decided to break).

What I didn’t love, however, was Scott’s own Prometheus. With threads that have a potential of linking to a timeline well before the Alien universe, this was a strong looking film that ended up being plenty flawed, and heavily reliant on its looks than anything else. It had a great world, and great plot devices, but none of that really cut the ice on the whole. I cannot deny, however, that the movie was an absolutely entrancing experience when I first watched it.

And let’s not even begin with Exodus: Gods and Kings. Ugh.

This is why The Martian. This is specifically why. I desperately wanted Ridley Scott to make a science-fiction film that brought the viewers back to appreciating just how great the guy is at his craft. And I half-knew that The Martian may as well have been it. A simple reason I ended up halting the Andy Weir novel that was the source material for this film was primarily because I wanted this movie to be an unparalleled experience.

And this despite the novel having one of the best openers of the century (not kidding).

I placed all my bets on this one. For Scott. For Damon. For everything this film was to me for me to want to love it. And I was in constant fear of this film having the potential of disappointing me on my viewing of it.

What’s it About?

Mark Watney (Matt Damon; the Bourne franchise) is left behind on Mars while on a mission, declared dead according to some pretty rational calculations.

Yeah, he’s not. And now he’s alone, and has to figure out how to make his living on Mars, whilst also trying to get in touch with the people on Earth to let him know that – well – he’s not dead and he needs to get back.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Lone Survivor

Lone Survivor

So ordinarily when I watch science-fiction movies these days, I get really nervous, because of – you know – obvious reasons. Most sci-fi films usually take the same absolutely humorless route; pepper that with your absolute-wonder trope and fill it with dangerous consequences that our space travelers have to fight and return back home safely, and you’re kinda done with your set of ordinary sci-fi space travel tropes.

Ridley Scott, however, has always given science fiction a very generous, distinguished leap forward. His involvement in franchise starters like Alien and the classic Blade Runner have always been things people have talked about for years and years. The quality of his films of late (Kingdom of Heaven, and most definitely Prometheus), however, haven’t given me enough fodder from his otherwise highly talented self.

(And no, I already spoke about The Counselor, which was one of the very few recent Scott films I loved.)

But really, wait a strong second there. Because The Martian is really all about Ridley Scott getting back to just some strong visual storytelling. Now while Weir’s basic story is pretty simplistic and doesn’t necessarily have Scott’s usual brand of layering it with plot-points and subplots when it comes to the genre, this is very much Scott’s film. His attention to detail, and more so his absolute craft of allowing you to see the bigger picture here comes very, very handy. The gorgeousness of the overall production design is given the extremely skilled collaborative hand of cinematographer Dariusz Wolski, for whom this is the fourth film with Scott. This is probably why most of the extremely wide, landscape shots remind you of the visual strength of Prometheus in bits and pieces. And it mostly also helps Scott immensely in his attempts to show how insignificant the film’s protagonist Watney looks in the wider spectrum of things. In an almost barren wasteland of a planet, you’re made to see how Watney is inexplicably alone in the entire scheme of things. You’re made to understand, through the minds of Scott and Wolski, that Watney’s smarts and willpower are the only thing helping him out in his dire situation.

In short, you understand the urgency that’s very accurately captured here.

But that’s not the only thing that grabs you and pulls you right in. The Martian’s almost-flawless 3D rendering gives you a very distinct feeling of witnessing things from a window. Add to that Wolski’s very distinct hand at lensing and there are many scenes where you feel – and especially in aerial shots – that the immovable mountains are filled with a certain life, subtly metamorphosing; shapeshifting almost, as the camera moves past them. Mix that in with a very Guardians of the Galaxy-esque music compilation and you have with you the talents of an excellent music supervisor. Of course, there’s the strong hand of composer Harry Gregson-Williams – another regular on Scott’s films in the music department. And how can one even forget the color grading and visual effects compositing here? Gosh, the film is supported by some of the most gorgeous skies ever. You can agree when Damon’s Watney talks about looking at “the horizon.” Really.

To Perform or Not to Perform

He is pretty much awesome. That is my considered opinion. Awesome.

He is pretty much awesome. That is my considered opinion. Awesome.

I haven’t seen Matt Damon in the picture for a long time now (yes, except for a highly similar character type in a very prominent movie last year), and so for me this was the film I was really waiting for. And damn. This is Damon literally being back in action. There’s the distinct passive aggressiveness that Damon’s character needs and the fact that he pulls it off apart from doing the usual rounds of survival makes the film even more entertaining. Jessica Chastain is awesome. She’s just awesome. She isn’t in the film for long enough, but she lends enough presence to bring her character some heft. Jeff Daniels does his usual cocky self and excels at it. Sean Bean is in a relatively tamer role here. Kristen Wiig and Chiwetel Ejiofor lend strong support, with Ejiofor pulling off some really subtle humor in some of the film’s trying times to break the intensity. And boy does he have timing! Kate Mara is great, and Michael Pena as usual makes complete use of his presence in the film. He’s just awesome. And then there’s Sebastian Stan in a slightly understated role, which he functions well in. The one who really steals the show among a slew of supporting performers here, however, is Donald Glover, who takes the very aspect of comedic timing by storm with simply his pokerface for support.

Worth it?

The Martian might have an extremely linear story, but with Ridley Scott’s strong direction and Weir’s source material calling for that amazingly passive-aggressive humor, which reflects on-screen in an absolutely badass manner, rest assured this definitely ends up being one of the most entertaining experiences this year in mainstream cinema. There’s equal amounts of shock, awe, laughter and thrill to be found in this gorgeous looking adaptation of a book that I definitely feel the need to complete now that I’ve watched the film. And there’s also Ridley Scott back in strong form! Hot damn!

No really, please watch it. It’s so great I can’t contain my excitement on it anymore. It’s like I could feel the depths of my heart grinning the widest it could ever grin. It’s THAT awesome.

Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Matt Damon
Jessica Chastain
Jeff Daniels
Director Ridley Scott
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

What to Expect

Saving Damon every single time

Saving Damon every single time

I loved The Counselor.

Call it howsoever terrible you’d like, but I probably loved the film more than anything else I had seen within the year – and mostly ‘cause I understood the film for what it was more than anyone. The movie was Ridley Scott’s original return back to form, and you’d probably have to get the director and his collaboration with McCarthy properly and give it a fair chance to understand why the two of them intended to do this project. (Try the unrated extended cut that’s roughly twenty minutes longer than its theatrical counterpart for a better understanding of the medium of storytelling the collaborators have decided to break).

What I didn’t love, however, was Scott’s own Prometheus. With threads that have a potential of linking to a timeline well before the Alien universe, this was a strong looking film that ended up being plenty flawed, and heavily reliant on its looks than anything else. It had a great world, and great plot devices, but none of that really cut the ice on the whole. I cannot deny, however, that the movie was an absolutely entrancing experience when I first watched it.

And let’s not even begin with Exodus: Gods and Kings. Ugh.

This is why The Martian. This is specifically why. I desperately wanted Ridley Scott to make a science-fiction film that brought the viewers back to appreciating just how great the guy is at his craft. And I half-knew that The Martian may as well have been it. A simple reason I ended up halting the Andy Weir novel that was the source material for this film was primarily because I wanted this movie to be an unparalleled experience.

And this despite the novel having one of the best openers of the century (not kidding).

I placed all my bets on this one. For Scott. For Damon. For everything this film was to me for me to want to love it. And I was in constant fear of this film having the potential of disappointing me on my viewing of it.

What’s it About?

Mark Watney (Matt Damon; the Bourne franchise) is left behind on Mars while on a mission, declared dead according to some pretty rational calculations.

Yeah, he’s not. And now he’s alone, and has to figure out how to make his living on Mars, whilst also trying to get in touch with the people on Earth to let him know that – well – he’s not dead and he needs to get back.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Lone Survivor

Lone Survivor

So ordinarily when I watch science-fiction movies these days, I get really nervous, because of – you know – obvious reasons. Most sci-fi films usually take the same absolutely humorless route; pepper that with your absolute-wonder trope and fill it with dangerous consequences that our space travelers have to fight and return back home safely, and you’re kinda done with your set of ordinary sci-fi space travel tropes.

Ridley Scott, however, has always given science fiction a very generous, distinguished leap forward. His involvement in franchise starters like Alien and the classic Blade Runner have always been things people have talked about for years and years. The quality of his films of late (Kingdom of Heaven, and most definitely Prometheus), however, haven’t given me enough fodder from his otherwise highly talented self.

(And no, I already spoke about The Counselor, which was one of the very few recent Scott films I loved.)

But really, wait a strong second there. Because The Martian is really all about Ridley Scott getting back to just some strong visual storytelling. Now while Weir’s basic story is pretty simplistic and doesn’t necessarily have Scott’s usual brand of layering it with plot-points and subplots when it comes to the genre, this is very much Scott’s film. His attention to detail, and more so his absolute craft of allowing you to see the bigger picture here comes very, very handy. The gorgeousness of the overall production design is given the extremely skilled collaborative hand of cinematographer Dariusz Wolski, for whom this is the fourth film with Scott. This is probably why most of the extremely wide, landscape shots remind you of the visual strength of Prometheus in bits and pieces. And it mostly also helps Scott immensely in his attempts to show how insignificant the film’s protagonist Watney looks in the wider spectrum of things. In an almost barren wasteland of a planet, you’re made to see how Watney is inexplicably alone in the entire scheme of things. You’re made to understand, through the minds of Scott and Wolski, that Watney’s smarts and willpower are the only thing helping him out in his dire situation.

In short, you understand the urgency that’s very accurately captured here.

But that’s not the only thing that grabs you and pulls you right in. The Martian’s almost-flawless 3D rendering gives you a very distinct feeling of witnessing things from a window. Add to that Wolski’s very distinct hand at lensing and there are many scenes where you feel – and especially in aerial shots – that the immovable mountains are filled with a certain life, subtly metamorphosing; shapeshifting almost, as the camera moves past them. Mix that in with a very Guardians of the Galaxy-esque music compilation and you have with you the talents of an excellent music supervisor. Of course, there’s the strong hand of composer Harry Gregson-Williams – another regular on Scott’s films in the music department. And how can one even forget the color grading and visual effects compositing here? Gosh, the film is supported by some of the most gorgeous skies ever. You can agree when Damon’s Watney talks about looking at “the horizon.” Really.

To Perform or Not to Perform

He is pretty much awesome. That is my considered opinion. Awesome.

He is pretty much awesome. That is my considered opinion. Awesome.

I haven’t seen Matt Damon in the picture for a long time now (yes, except for a highly similar character type in a very prominent movie last year), and so for me this was the film I was really waiting for. And damn. This is Damon literally being back in action. There’s the distinct passive aggressiveness that Damon’s character needs and the fact that he pulls it off apart from doing the usual rounds of survival makes the film even more entertaining. Jessica Chastain is awesome. She’s just awesome. She isn’t in the film for long enough, but she lends enough presence to bring her character some heft. Jeff Daniels does his usual cocky self and excels at it. Sean Bean is in a relatively tamer role here. Kristen Wiig and Chiwetel Ejiofor lend strong support, with Ejiofor pulling off some really subtle humor in some of the film’s trying times to break the intensity. And boy does he have timing! Kate Mara is great, and Michael Pena as usual makes complete use of his presence in the film. He’s just awesome. And then there’s Sebastian Stan in a slightly understated role, which he functions well in. The one who really steals the show among a slew of supporting performers here, however, is Donald Glover, who takes the very aspect of comedic timing by storm with simply his pokerface for support.

Worth it?

The Martian might have an extremely linear story, but with Ridley Scott’s strong direction and Weir’s source material calling for that amazingly passive-aggressive humor, which reflects on-screen in an absolutely badass manner, rest assured this definitely ends up being one of the most entertaining experiences this year in mainstream cinema. There’s equal amounts of shock, awe, laughter and thrill to be found in this gorgeous looking adaptation of a book that I definitely feel the need to complete now that I’ve watched the film. And there’s also Ridley Scott back in strong form! Hot damn!

No really, please watch it. It’s so great I can’t contain my excitement on it anymore. It’s like I could feel the depths of my heart grinning the widest it could ever grin. It’s THAT awesome.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Matt Damon
Jessica Chastain
Jeff Daniels
Director Ridley Scott
Consensus: 4.5 Stars
Extraordinary!

What to Expect

I loved The Counselor.

Call it howsoever terrible you’d like, but I probably loved the film more than anything else I had seen within the year – and mostly ‘cause I understood the film for what it was more than anyone. The movie was Ridley Scott’s original return back to form, and you’d probably have to get the director and his collaboration with McCarthy properly and give it a fair chance to understand why the two of them intended to do this project. (Try the unrated extended cut that’s roughly twenty minutes longer than its theatrical counterpart for a better understanding of the medium of storytelling the collaborators have decided to break).

What I didn’t love, however, was Scott’s own Prometheus. With threads that have a potential of linking to a timeline well before the Alien universe, this was a strong looking film that ended up being plenty flawed, and heavily reliant on its looks than anything else. It had a great world, and great plot devices, but none of that really cut the ice on the whole. I cannot deny, however, that the movie was an absolutely entrancing experience when I first watched it.

And let’s not even begin with Exodus: Gods and Kings. Ugh.

This is why The Martian. This is specifically why. I desperately wanted Ridley Scott to make a science-fiction film that brought the viewers back to appreciating just how great the guy is at his craft. And I half-knew that The Martian may as well have been it. A simple reason I ended up halting the Andy Weir novel that was the source material for this film was primarily because I wanted this movie to be an unparalleled experience.

And this despite the novel having one of the best openers of the century (not kidding).

I placed all my bets on this one. For Scott. For Damon. For everything this film was to me for me to want to love it. And I was in constant fear of this film having the potential of disappointing me on my viewing of it.

What’s it About?

Mark Watney (Matt Damon; the Bourne franchise) is left behind on Mars while on a mission, declared dead according to some pretty rational calculations.

Yeah, he’s not. And now he’s alone, and has to figure out how to make his living on Mars, whilst also trying to get in touch with the people on Earth to let him know that – well – he’s not dead and he needs to get back.

Lone survivor

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

So ordinarily when I watch science-fiction movies these days, I get really nervous, because of – you know – obvious reasons. Most sci-fi films usually take the same absolutely humorless route; pepper that with your absolute-wonder trope and fill it with dangerous consequences that our space travelers have to fight and return back home safely, and you’re kinda done with your set of ordinary sci-fi space travel tropes.

Ridley Scott, however, has always given science fiction a very generous, distinguished leap forward. His involvement in franchise starters like Alien and the classic Blade Runner have always been things people have talked about for years and years. The quality of his films of late (Kingdom of Heaven, and most definitely Prometheus), however, haven’t given me enough fodder from his otherwise highly talented self.

(And no, I already spoke about The Counselor, which was one of the very few recent Scott films I loved.)

But really, wait a strong second there. Because The Martian is really all about Ridley Scott getting back to just some strong visual storytelling. Now while Weir’s basic story is pretty simplistic and doesn’t necessarily have Scott’s usual brand of layering it with plot-points and subplots when it comes to the genre, this is very much Scott’s film. His attention to detail, and more so his absolute craft of allowing you to see the bigger picture here comes very, very handy. The gorgeousness of the overall production design is given the extremely skilled collaborative hand of cinematographer Dariusz Wolski, for whom this is the fourth film with Scott. This is probably why most of the extremely wide, landscape shots remind you of the visual strength of Prometheus in bits and pieces. And it mostly also helps Scott immensely in his attempts to show how insignificant the film’s protagonist Watney looks in the wider spectrum of things. In an almost barren wasteland of a planet, you’re made to see how Watney is inexplicably alone in the entire scheme of things. You’re made to understand, through the minds of Scott and Wolski, that Watney’s smarts and willpower are the only thing helping him out in his dire situation.

In short, you understand the urgency that’s very accurately captured here.

But that’s not the only thing that grabs you and pulls you right in. The Martian’s almost-flawless 3D rendering gives you a very distinct feeling of witnessing things from a window. Add to that Wolski’s very distinct hand at lensing and there are many scenes where you feel – and especially in aerial shots – that the immovable mountains are filled with a certain life, subtly metamorphosing; shapeshifting almost, as the camera moves past them. Mix that in with a very Guardians of the Galaxy-esque music compilation and you have with you the talents of an excellent music supervisor. Of course, there’s the strong hand of composer Harry Gregson-Williams – another regular on Scott’s films in the music department. And how can one even forget the color grading and visual effects compositing here? Gosh, the film is supported by some of the most gorgeous skies ever. You can agree when Damon’s Watney talks about looking at “the horizon.” Really.

He is pretty much awesome. That is my considered opinion. Awesome.

To Perform or Not to Perform

I haven’t seen Matt Damon in the picture for a long time now (yes, except for a highly similar character type in a very prominent movie last year), and so for me this was the film I was really waiting for. And damn. This is Damon literally being back in action. There’s the distinct passive aggressiveness that Damon’s character needs and the fact that he pulls it off apart from doing the usual rounds of survival makes the film even more entertaining. Jessica Chastain is awesome. She’s just awesome. She isn’t in the film for long enough, but she lends enough presence to bring her character some heft. Jeff Daniels does his usual cocky self and excels at it. Sean Bean is in a relatively tamer role here. Kristen Wiig and Chiwetel Ejiofor lend strong support, with Ejiofor pulling off some really subtle humor in some of the film’s trying times to break the intensity. And boy does he have timing! Kate Mara is great, and Michael Pena as usual makes complete use of his presence in the film. He’s just awesome. And then there’s Sebastian Stan in a slightly understated role, which he functions well in. The one who really steals the show among a slew of supporting performers here, however, is Donald Glover, who takes the very aspect of comedic timing by storm with simply his pokerface for support.

Worth it?

The Martian might have an extremely linear story, but with Ridley Scott’s strong direction and Weir’s source material calling for that amazingly passive-aggressive humor, which reflects on-screen in an absolutely badass manner, rest assured this definitely ends up being one of the most entertaining experiences this year in mainstream cinema. There’s equal amounts of shock, awe, laughter and thrill to be found in this gorgeous looking adaptation of a book that I definitely feel the need to complete now that I’ve watched the film. And there’s also Ridley Scott back in strong form! Hot damn!

No really, please watch it. It’s so great I can’t contain my excitement on it anymore. It’s like I could feel the depths of my heart grinning the widest it could ever grin. It’s THAT awesome.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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