The Perfect Guy

or (The Imperfect Assembly-Line Film)


The Perfect Guy

  • or (The Imperfect Assembly-Line Film)

The Perfect Guy

  • or (The Imperfect Assembly-Line Film)


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Sanaa Lathan
Michael Ealy
Morris Chestnut

Written by

Tyger Williams

Directed by

David M. Rosenthal



coming up

What to Expect

The Perfect Guy is just what a typical dumped-boyfriend-turned-stalker story looks and feels like. The setup and turn of events have been done to death, and yet, it somehow still has some appeal left for those hungry for cliched thrillers. The recent years have often told us that movies that tread the beaten path, fetch in the box-office numbers despite being critically panned; No Good Deed immediately pops in as an example of the claim. The Perfect Guy is further proof that the studios still like to play the game safe and count on such films to keep the ball rolling.

What’s it About?

Leah Vaughn (Sanaa Lathan) is a successful lobbyist who breaks up with Dave (Morris Chestnut), her boyfriend of two years, because he isn’t ready to commit to a life of kids and family. Enter Carter (Michael Ealy), who is everything that she craves and is immediately labeled as the eponymous ‘Perfect Guy’ by her friends, and – after a brief weekend – even by her parents. Post an unprecedented violent turn from Carter who loses his cool at a gas station, a scared and disoriented Leah ends their relationship. Carter, quite obviously, doesn’t take it well and spirals from upset to crazy to lunatic fairly quickly; more so, when Leah reconciles with Dave. Things start to go ugly for everyone involved, leading up to it being all about basic survival.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Coolest stalker ever? Nah!

Coolest stalker ever? Nah!

If I asked someone to list down all the traits and ‘plot points’ that a movie of this nature should have, they would, in all probability end up describing with precision everything that this movie has. Carter exhibits all the character traits that he should, namely, responsible, caring, sensitive, charming, funny, respectful and what not, to immediately ring the alarm bells for anyone else, but not in this movie. Here, the traits are checkmarks needed to establish him as good-guy-turning-bad. And if that wasn’t obvious, one of Leah’s friends actually awards him the to-be-paradoxical titular compliment. Clearly subtlety is not a virtue here.

The story is so predictable that one could actually end up narrating the story before it unfolds on screen. With something like that, the onus was definitely on the screenplay to spring some surprises, but screenwriter Tyger Williams packs in no surprises, and it keeps pace with your low expectations. It is particularly disappointing that some scenes that had a lot of potential to be really electric – like the one in which Dave confronts Carter in a bar – ends up being flat, what with almost-laughable, uninspired dialogues and a really insipid background score to boot. Scenes displaying Carter’s B&E (breaking and entering) into Leah’s apartment could have been really creepy but instead turns ineffective, thanks to some choppy editing and shoddy camerawork which is further compounded by weird lighting that intends to keep events and objects unfocused. Movies like these come with a promise of an almost-fetishized form of dangerous seduction, or – at the very least – cheap thrills. This one, sadly, has none of those and doesn’t have anything else to make up for it either.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Michael Ealy (left) and Sanaa Lathan star in the Screen Gems motion pictureTHE PERFECT GUY.

Oh nothing, just looking through your wardrobe! Need some of your dresses for a party!

Among the rare good points in the movie is the casting of the leads, who are all good looking and suited to these roles on paper (it is a different matter altogether that the script doesn’t make full use of them). Sanaa Lathan doesn’t look like the victim and it is only in the last 15 minutes or so that she gets to live up to the potential and exhibit some dynamism in her performance. The buff guy that he is, Morris Chestnut, who has the smallest role of the trio of leads is unfortunately made to appear ineffective, thereby making the lest impact. Additionally, in scenes of conversational intimidation, the dialogues fail him miserably and despite his towering persona, the effect is heavily diluted. I remember Michael Ealy from television’s Almost Human, and was quite impressed by his performance as the humanoid. Here, Ealy may pull off the good guy, but ends up just brooding and snarling as the crazy stalker. He never fully assumes the lunatic part that was key to believe that he had it in him to make such a turncoat to himself. Probably should’ve watched Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman in American Psycho for some inspiration, eh?

Worth it?

The Perfect Guy is the perfect example of assembly line filmmaking that has a set format and doesn’t break any new grounds or try to explore any new territories. It doesn’t add nor subtract anything from the formula and is bound to please those who like the tried and tested way.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Sanaa Lathan
Michael Ealy
Morris Chestnut

Written by

Tyger Williams

Directed by

David M. Rosenthal



What to Expect

The Perfect Guy is just what a typical dumped-boyfriend-turned-stalker story looks and feels like. The setup and turn of events have been done to death, and yet, it somehow still has some appeal left for those hungry for cliched thrillers. The recent years have often told us that movies that tread the beaten path, fetch in the box-office numbers despite being critically panned; No Good Deed immediately pops in as an example of the claim. The Perfect Guy is further proof that the studios still like to play the game safe and count on such films to keep the ball rolling.

What’s it About?

Leah Vaughn (Sanaa Lathan) is a successful lobbyist who breaks up with Dave (Morris Chestnut), her boyfriend of two years, because he isn’t ready to commit to a life of kids and family. Enter Carter (Michael Ealy), who is everything that she craves and is immediately labeled as the eponymous ‘Perfect Guy’ by her friends, and – after a brief weekend – even by her parents. Post an unprecedented violent turn from Carter who loses his cool at a gas station, a scared and disoriented Leah ends their relationship. Carter, quite obviously, doesn’t take it well and spirals from upset to crazy to lunatic fairly quickly; more so, when Leah reconciles with Dave. Things start to go ugly for everyone involved, leading up to it being all about basic survival.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Coolest stalker ever? Nah!

Coolest stalker ever? Nah!

If I asked someone to list down all the traits and ‘plot points’ that a movie of this nature should have, they would, in all probability end up describing with precision everything that this movie has. Carter exhibits all the character traits that he should, namely, responsible, caring, sensitive, charming, funny, respectful and what not, to immediately ring the alarm bells for anyone else, but not in this movie. Here, the traits are checkmarks needed to establish him as good-guy-turning-bad. And if that wasn’t obvious, one of Leah’s friends actually awards him the to-be-paradoxical titular compliment. Clearly subtlety is not a virtue here.

The story is so predictable that one could actually end up narrating the story before it unfolds on screen. With something like that, the onus was definitely on the screenplay to spring some surprises, but screenwriter Tyger Williams packs in no surprises, and it keeps pace with your low expectations. It is particularly disappointing that some scenes that had a lot of potential to be really electric – like the one in which Dave confronts Carter in a bar – ends up being flat, what with almost-laughable, uninspired dialogues and a really insipid background score to boot. Scenes displaying Carter’s B&E (breaking and entering) into Leah’s apartment could have been really creepy but instead turns ineffective, thanks to some choppy editing and shoddy camerawork which is further compounded by weird lighting that intends to keep events and objects unfocused. Movies like these come with a promise of an almost-fetishized form of dangerous seduction, or – at the very least – cheap thrills. This one, sadly, has none of those and doesn’t have anything else to make up for it either.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Michael Ealy (left) and Sanaa Lathan star in the Screen Gems motion pictureTHE PERFECT GUY.

Oh nothing, just looking through your wardrobe! Need some of your dresses for a party!

Among the rare good points in the movie is the casting of the leads, who are all good looking and suited to these roles on paper (it is a different matter altogether that the script doesn’t make full use of them). Sanaa Lathan doesn’t look like the victim and it is only in the last 15 minutes or so that she gets to live up to the potential and exhibit some dynamism in her performance. The buff guy that he is, Morris Chestnut, who has the smallest role of the trio of leads is unfortunately made to appear ineffective, thereby making the lest impact. Additionally, in scenes of conversational intimidation, the dialogues fail him miserably and despite his towering persona, the effect is heavily diluted. I remember Michael Ealy from television’s Almost Human, and was quite impressed by his performance as the humanoid. Here, Ealy may pull off the good guy, but ends up just brooding and snarling as the crazy stalker. He never fully assumes the lunatic part that was key to believe that he had it in him to make such a turncoat to himself. Probably should’ve watched Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman in American Psycho for some inspiration, eh?

Worth it?

The Perfect Guy is the perfect example of assembly line filmmaking that has a set format and doesn’t break any new grounds or try to explore any new territories. It doesn’t add nor subtract anything from the formula and is bound to please those who like the tried and tested way.

Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Sanaa Lathan
Morris Chestnut
Michael Ealy
Director David M. Rosenthal
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

Um.... No Good D- sorry, The Perfect Guy, people!

Um…. No Good D- sorry, The Perfect Guy, people!

The Perfect Guy is just what a typical dumped-boyfriend-turned-stalker story looks and feels like. The setup and turn of events have been done to death, and yet, it somehow still has some appeal left for those hungry for cliched thrillers. The recent years have often told us that movies that tread the beaten path, fetch in the box-office numbers despite being critically panned; No Good Deed immediately pops in as an example of the claim. The Perfect Guy is further proof that the studios still like to play the game safe and count on such films to keep the ball rolling.

What’s it About?

Leah Vaughn (Sanaa Lathan) is a successful lobbyist who breaks up with Dave (Morris Chestnut), her boyfriend of two years, because he isn’t ready to commit to a life of kids and family. Enter Carter (Michael Ealy), who is everything that she craves and is immediately labeled as the eponymous ‘Perfect Guy’ by her friends, and – after a brief weekend – even by her parents. Post an unprecedented violent turn from Carter who loses his cool at a gas station, a scared and disoriented Leah ends their relationship. Carter, quite obviously, doesn’t take it well and spirals from upset to crazy to lunatic fairly quickly; more so, when Leah reconciles with Dave. Things start to go ugly for everyone involved, leading up to it being all about basic survival.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Coolest stalker ever? Nah!

Coolest stalker ever? Nah!

If I asked someone to list down all the traits and ‘plot points’ that a movie of this nature should have, they would, in all probability end up describing with precision everything that this movie has. Carter exhibits all the character traits that he should, namely, responsible, caring, sensitive, charming, funny, respectful and what not, to immediately ring the alarm bells for anyone else, but not in this movie. Here, the traits are checkmarks needed to establish him as good-guy-turning-bad. And if that wasn’t obvious, one of Leah’s friends actually awards him the to-be-paradoxical titular compliment. Clearly subtlety is not a virtue here.

The story is so predictable that one could actually end up narrating the story before it unfolds on screen. With something like that, the onus was definitely on the screenplay to spring some surprises, but screenwriter Tyger Williams packs in no surprises, and it keeps pace with your low expectations. It is particularly disappointing that some scenes that had a lot of potential to be really electric – like the one in which Dave confronts Carter in a bar – ends up being flat, what with almost-laughable, uninspired dialogues and a really insipid background score to boot. Scenes displaying Carter’s B&E (breaking and entering) into Leah’s apartment could have been really creepy but instead turns ineffective, thanks to some choppy editing and shoddy camerawork which is further compounded by weird lighting that intends to keep events and objects unfocused. Movies like these come with a promise of an almost-fetishized form of dangerous seduction, or – at the very least – cheap thrills. This one, sadly, has none of those and doesn’t have anything else to make up for it either.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Michael Ealy (left) and Sanaa Lathan star in the Screen Gems motion pictureTHE PERFECT GUY.

Oh nothing, just looking through your wardrobe! Need some of your dresses for a party!

Among the rare good points in the movie is the casting of the leads, who are all good looking and suited to these roles on paper (it is a different matter altogether that the script doesn’t make full use of them). Sanaa Lathan doesn’t look like the victim and it is only in the last 15 minutes or so that she gets to live up to the potential and exhibit some dynamism in her performance. The buff guy that he is, Morris Chestnut, who has the smallest role of the trio of leads is unfortunately made to appear ineffective, thereby making the lest impact. Additionally, in scenes of conversational intimidation, the dialogues fail him miserably and despite his towering persona, the effect is heavily diluted. I remember Michael Ealy from television’s Almost Human, and was quite impressed by his performance as the humanoid. Here, Ealy may pull off the good guy, but ends up just brooding and snarling as the crazy stalker. He never fully assumes the lunatic part that was key to believe that he had it in him to make such a turncoat to himself. Probably should’ve watched Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman in American Psycho for some inspiration, eh?

Worth it?

The Perfect Guy is the perfect example of assembly line filmmaking that has a set format and doesn’t break any new grounds or try to explore any new territories. It doesn’t add nor subtract anything from the formula and is bound to please those who like the tried and tested way.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Sanaa Lathan
Morris Chestnut
Michael Ealy
Director David M. Rosenthal
Consensus: 2.5 Stars
Comme ci, comme ça

What to Expect

The Perfect Guy is just what a typical dumped-boyfriend-turned-stalker story looks and feels like. The setup and turn of events have been done to death, and yet, it somehow still has some appeal left for those hungry for cliched thrillers. The recent years have often told us that movies that tread the beaten path, fetch in the box-office numbers despite being critically panned; No Good Deed immediately pops in as an example of the claim. The Perfect Guy is further proof that the studios still like to play the game safe and count on such films to keep the ball rolling.

What’s it About?

Leah Vaughn (Sanaa Lathan) is a successful lobbyist who breaks up with Dave (Morris Chestnut), her boyfriend of two years, because he isn’t ready to commit to a life of kids and family. Enter Carter (Michael Ealy), who is everything that she craves and is immediately labeled as the eponymous ‘Perfect Guy’ by her friends, and – after a brief weekend – even by her parents. Post an unprecedented violent turn from Carter who loses his cool at a gas station, a scared and disoriented Leah ends their relationship. Carter, quite obviously, doesn’t take it well and spirals from upset to crazy to lunatic fairly quickly; more so, when Leah reconciles with Dave. Things start to go ugly for everyone involved, leading up to it being all about basic survival.

Coolest stalker ever? Nah!

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

If I asked someone to list down all the traits and ‘plot points’ that a movie of this nature should have, they would, in all probability end up describing with precision everything that this movie has. Carter exhibits all the character traits that he should, namely, responsible, caring, sensitive, charming, funny, respectful and what not, to immediately ring the alarm bells for anyone else, but not in this movie. Here, the traits are checkmarks needed to establish him as good-guy-turning-bad. And if that wasn’t obvious, one of Leah’s friends actually awards him the to-be-paradoxical titular compliment. Clearly subtlety is not a virtue here.

The story is so predictable that one could actually end up narrating the story before it unfolds on screen. With something like that, the onus was definitely on the screenplay to spring some surprises, but screenwriter Tyger Williams packs in no surprises, and it keeps pace with your low expectations. It is particularly disappointing that some scenes that had a lot of potential to be really electric – like the one in which Dave confronts Carter in a bar – ends up being flat, what with almost-laughable, uninspired dialogues and a really insipid background score to boot. Scenes displaying Carter’s B&E (breaking and entering) into Leah’s apartment could have been really creepy but instead turns ineffective, thanks to some choppy editing and shoddy camerawork which is further compounded by weird lighting that intends to keep events and objects unfocused. Movies like these come with a promise of an almost-fetishized form of dangerous seduction, or – at the very least – cheap thrills. This one, sadly, has none of those and doesn’t have anything else to make up for it either.

Oh nothing, just looking through your wardrobe! Need some of your dresses for a party!

To Perform or Not to Perform

Among the rare good points in the movie is the casting of the leads, who are all good looking and suited to these roles on paper (it is a different matter altogether that the script doesn’t make full use of them). Sanaa Lathan doesn’t look like the victim and it is only in the last 15 minutes or so that she gets to live up to the potential and exhibit some dynamism in her performance. The buff guy that he is, Morris Chestnut, who has the smallest role of the trio of leads is unfortunately made to appear ineffective, thereby making the lest impact. Additionally, in scenes of conversational intimidation, the dialogues fail him miserably and despite his towering persona, the effect is heavily diluted. I remember Michael Ealy from television’s Almost Human, and was quite impressed by his performance as the humanoid. Here, Ealy may pull off the good guy, but ends up just brooding and snarling as the crazy stalker. He never fully assumes the lunatic part that was key to believe that he had it in him to make such a turncoat to himself. Probably should’ve watched Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman in American Psycho for some inspiration, eh?

Worth it?

The Perfect Guy is the perfect example of assembly line filmmaking that has a set format and doesn’t break any new grounds or try to explore any new territories. It doesn’t add nor subtract anything from the formula and is bound to please those who like the tried and tested way.

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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