The Transporter Refueled

What’s the point, really?


The Transporter Refueled

  • What’s the point, really?

The Transporter Refueled

  • What’s the point, really?


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Ed Skrein
Ray Stevenson
Loan Chabanol
Radivoje Bukvic
Gabriella Wright

Written by

Adam Cooper
Bill Collage
Luc Besson
Robert Mark Kamen

Directed by

Camille Delamarre


coming up

What to Expect

So “the makers of The Taken Trilogy” decided to reboot the Transporter series. And Jason Statham isn’t in it. Oh, and just in case you didn’t get that this is a reboot, the rather obvious title – The Transporter Refueled – kinda says it all now, does it not?

Ah, fun times.

Let’s, however, get back to what really makes this movie so interestingly polarizing in expectation more than anything else. Now, while Statham shot to performative fame in Guy Ritchie films Snatch and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, it is the low-mid-budgeted The Transporter, released to the unwitting audience, that brought him the actual success he holds right now. Of course, with Louis Leterrier having taken the backseat, the series took a serious downfall in the hands of Olivier Megaton (ugh), who eventually directed the third installment of the franchise.

The continued fascination of providing solid B-Movie thrills reached the ordinary human being’s television set, when the franchise made its debut to the small screen, with Chris Vance reprising the role of Frank Martin. Now while I found this series to be moderately satisfying entertainment – even slightly commendable by its second season – it was mostly due to the rather decent action set-pieces.

Ed Skrein though.

On first look, and especially on the basis of the trailers, he doesn’t look a wee bit like the character he’s taken up to reprise. And what’s more; there’s quite apparently nothing new to see here, really.

Or is there?

What’s it About?

Frank Martin gets called on to do a job that obviously goes awry. Oh, it also involves his Dad getting kidnapped and stuff.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Look who's flaunting his moves! NOT Jason Statham!

Look who’s flaunting his moves! NOT Jason Statham!

Let me be really upfront here: when it comes to obviously lightweight, massy-mainstream action films, the least I desire is for action to be strongly choreographed and shot, and the lead character to be a competent and convincing presence in both performance and conviction while diving into the set-pieces. And despite having some really dumb plot points, the first two installments of the franchise clicked on a very definite basis of the action, and Statham’s undeniably smooth performance of Martin (let’s pretend forget the third one completely). And this is where the problem begins.

Ed Skrein is not Frank Martin. Pokerface does not a Frank Martin make. But that’s only a part of the problem. The real problem here (and this is solely keeping the problem of even desiring a reboot aside) is Camille Delamarre’s direction. You can’t be surprised though, really, if you look at his film credits. Having been an editor prior for Transporter 3 and Taken 2 (sigh), Delamarre made the eventual decision to shift to direction with Brick Mansions, an adaptation of EuropaCorp’s own French-language B-Movie glee-fest Banlieue 13 (which also spawned an equally entertaining sequel, but that’s another story).

And those who have seen it will agree that Brick Mansions is a terrible, redundant and unnecessary English-language remake that did not need to exist. Ever.

Now, I’m not directly judging his credibility, but let’s be honest; he hasn’t really been a part of anything relatively decent since he’s been around in the more mainstream side of the film business. Relatively, this might be his best work yet, but that doesn’t really do much when looked at solely as a film. The array of writers have written what’s possibly the most basic plot, with extremely predictable character arcs to support it. There’s a basic, suave protagonist, a basic support-system (or sidekick as you may) in the form of his Dad, and some basic femme fatales. Oh, did I forget the evil-guy-is-evil antagonist?

Here’s the twist though: directors have a large hand at executing a plot on visual ground, howsoever generic. They help the team achieve the vision everyone has of the final product, and push the performers to bring a level of relatable emotion within them. Delamarre instead focusses only on the cool for almost the whole film. And while the film oozes a lot of style, and some very decently choreographed action set-pieces, it’s how flat and generic it all feels throughout the film’s runtime. You don’t care about Frank Martin, you don’t care about the three mysterious women running the conflict and you certainly don’t give a rat’s rear-end about the antagonist. What you do care about, as a tiny respite in this otherwise mostly lifeless film, is where will this plot eventually go; this, despite the eventual predictability of it all.

The fact that the movie was made on a tight budget is very visible, especially during the action set-pieces, when most of the close-up impact shots are captured using different cameras the usual. This is especially noticeable to the discerning eye when you’re able to suddenly catch the striking absence of color and pixel information almost immediately. This is something I’ve been noticing as a trend quite often now. What the makers really have to pay for this (admittedly cost-efficient) move is the ultimate shoddiness and visual inconsistency of the said set-pieces. Not that the makers mind, because there don’t seem to be any complaints on this superficially minuscule problem from the target audience.

It doesn’t automatically turn it into a non-issue though.

The music bills in well with the film’s theme. Production design gives the film a very slick, sans-residue feel. Film editing by Julien Rey is thankfully less choppy then Delamarre’s edit decisions himself. Compared to her last film Lucy however, Rey still has to be supervised by Delamarre (if I’m not wrong), and the action, shot on multiple-cameras with multiple takes, is still filled with some weirdly unfathomable dissatisfaction, especially vaguely centered around continuity. It might not be Rey’s fault entirely here.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Look who's being badass! You guessed it... NOT Jason Statham!

Look who’s being badass! You guessed it… NOT Jason Statham!

Ed Skrein has a pokerface and mouths a few dialogues.

Yeah.

One of the biggest problems with Ed Skrein, in all seriousness though, is not – and I repeat, not – his reprisal of a role brought to fame by Statham. Hard fact? Chris Vance is still a decent Frank Martin, despite what a more biased opinion would say, and that’s purely because even Vance has that one thing Skrein doesn’t: conviction. Should there be an eventual existence of the trilogy this was intended to be a part of, however, one can’t rubbish the possibility of his comfort-level in the role increasing a notch or two. Ray Stevenson is great fun, but ultimately wasted in a gratuitous character addition that can’t really replace François Berléand’s Inspector Tarconi, a very credible source of dry, passive-aggressive humor throughout the first trilogy (and eventually the series). Loan Chabanol is a cookie-cutter femme-fatale, and it works for most part. Radivoje Bukvić is efficient, but forgettable.

Worth it?

On the one hand, the film’s not as excruciatingly terrible as a whole lot of people think it would be. That being said, it’s still a less-than-satisfactory addition to the franchise, being ultimately consistent on how flat and generic it feels overall. With Skrein still having miles to go before he might exude some conviction on the character, the movie overall doesn’t seem to making any remarkable jumps in content or stylistic elements either. It’s just another movie in a rapidly downing franchise that the producers are desperately hanging on by the threads of.

It doesn’t mean there isn’t an audience that has the potential to get their fix from it. It just means that as a film, it is still a bad, if thankfully tolerable, addition to a lightweight franchise that wasn’t a mind-bender in the first place.

And that’s just disappointing.

Consensus: 1.5 Stars
But why?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Ed Skrein
Ray Stevenson
Loan Chabanol
Radivoje Bukvic
Gabriella Wright

Written by

Adam Cooper
Bill Collage
Luc Besson
Robert Mark Kamen

Directed by

Camille Delamarre


What to Expect

So “the makers of The Taken Trilogy” decided to reboot the Transporter series. And Jason Statham isn’t in it. Oh, and just in case you didn’t get that this is a reboot, the rather obvious title – The Transporter Refueled – kinda says it all now, does it not?

Ah, fun times.

Let’s, however, get back to what really makes this movie so interestingly polarizing in expectation more than anything else. Now, while Statham shot to performative fame in Guy Ritchie films Snatch and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, it is the low-mid-budgeted The Transporter, released to the unwitting audience, that brought him the actual success he holds right now. Of course, with Louis Leterrier having taken the backseat, the series took a serious downfall in the hands of Olivier Megaton (ugh), who eventually directed the third installment of the franchise.

The continued fascination of providing solid B-Movie thrills reached the ordinary human being’s television set, when the franchise made its debut to the small screen, with Chris Vance reprising the role of Frank Martin. Now while I found this series to be moderately satisfying entertainment – even slightly commendable by its second season – it was mostly due to the rather decent action set-pieces.

Ed Skrein though.

On first look, and especially on the basis of the trailers, he doesn’t look a wee bit like the character he’s taken up to reprise. And what’s more; there’s quite apparently nothing new to see here, really.

Or is there?

What’s it About?

Frank Martin gets called on to do a job that obviously goes awry. Oh, it also involves his Dad getting kidnapped and stuff.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Look who's flaunting his moves! NOT Jason Statham!

Look who’s flaunting his moves! NOT Jason Statham!

Let me be really upfront here: when it comes to obviously lightweight, massy-mainstream action films, the least I desire is for action to be strongly choreographed and shot, and the lead character to be a competent and convincing presence in both performance and conviction while diving into the set-pieces. And despite having some really dumb plot points, the first two installments of the franchise clicked on a very definite basis of the action, and Statham’s undeniably smooth performance of Martin (let’s pretend forget the third one completely). And this is where the problem begins.

Ed Skrein is not Frank Martin. Pokerface does not a Frank Martin make. But that’s only a part of the problem. The real problem here (and this is solely keeping the problem of even desiring a reboot aside) is Camille Delamarre’s direction. You can’t be surprised though, really, if you look at his film credits. Having been an editor prior for Transporter 3 and Taken 2 (sigh), Delamarre made the eventual decision to shift to direction with Brick Mansions, an adaptation of EuropaCorp’s own French-language B-Movie glee-fest Banlieue 13 (which also spawned an equally entertaining sequel, but that’s another story).

And those who have seen it will agree that Brick Mansions is a terrible, redundant and unnecessary English-language remake that did not need to exist. Ever.

Now, I’m not directly judging his credibility, but let’s be honest; he hasn’t really been a part of anything relatively decent since he’s been around in the more mainstream side of the film business. Relatively, this might be his best work yet, but that doesn’t really do much when looked at solely as a film. The array of writers have written what’s possibly the most basic plot, with extremely predictable character arcs to support it. There’s a basic, suave protagonist, a basic support-system (or sidekick as you may) in the form of his Dad, and some basic femme fatales. Oh, did I forget the evil-guy-is-evil antagonist?

Here’s the twist though: directors have a large hand at executing a plot on visual ground, howsoever generic. They help the team achieve the vision everyone has of the final product, and push the performers to bring a level of relatable emotion within them. Delamarre instead focusses only on the cool for almost the whole film. And while the film oozes a lot of style, and some very decently choreographed action set-pieces, it’s how flat and generic it all feels throughout the film’s runtime. You don’t care about Frank Martin, you don’t care about the three mysterious women running the conflict and you certainly don’t give a rat’s rear-end about the antagonist. What you do care about, as a tiny respite in this otherwise mostly lifeless film, is where will this plot eventually go; this, despite the eventual predictability of it all.

The fact that the movie was made on a tight budget is very visible, especially during the action set-pieces, when most of the close-up impact shots are captured using different cameras the usual. This is especially noticeable to the discerning eye when you’re able to suddenly catch the striking absence of color and pixel information almost immediately. This is something I’ve been noticing as a trend quite often now. What the makers really have to pay for this (admittedly cost-efficient) move is the ultimate shoddiness and visual inconsistency of the said set-pieces. Not that the makers mind, because there don’t seem to be any complaints on this superficially minuscule problem from the target audience.

It doesn’t automatically turn it into a non-issue though.

The music bills in well with the film’s theme. Production design gives the film a very slick, sans-residue feel. Film editing by Julien Rey is thankfully less choppy then Delamarre’s edit decisions himself. Compared to her last film Lucy however, Rey still has to be supervised by Delamarre (if I’m not wrong), and the action, shot on multiple-cameras with multiple takes, is still filled with some weirdly unfathomable dissatisfaction, especially vaguely centered around continuity. It might not be Rey’s fault entirely here.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Look who's being badass! You guessed it... NOT Jason Statham!

Look who’s being badass! You guessed it… NOT Jason Statham!

Ed Skrein has a pokerface and mouths a few dialogues.

Yeah.

One of the biggest problems with Ed Skrein, in all seriousness though, is not – and I repeat, not – his reprisal of a role brought to fame by Statham. Hard fact? Chris Vance is still a decent Frank Martin, despite what a more biased opinion would say, and that’s purely because even Vance has that one thing Skrein doesn’t: conviction. Should there be an eventual existence of the trilogy this was intended to be a part of, however, one can’t rubbish the possibility of his comfort-level in the role increasing a notch or two. Ray Stevenson is great fun, but ultimately wasted in a gratuitous character addition that can’t really replace François Berléand’s Inspector Tarconi, a very credible source of dry, passive-aggressive humor throughout the first trilogy (and eventually the series). Loan Chabanol is a cookie-cutter femme-fatale, and it works for most part. Radivoje Bukvić is efficient, but forgettable.

Worth it?

On the one hand, the film’s not as excruciatingly terrible as a whole lot of people think it would be. That being said, it’s still a less-than-satisfactory addition to the franchise, being ultimately consistent on how flat and generic it feels overall. With Skrein still having miles to go before he might exude some conviction on the character, the movie overall doesn’t seem to making any remarkable jumps in content or stylistic elements either. It’s just another movie in a rapidly downing franchise that the producers are desperately hanging on by the threads of.

It doesn’t mean there isn’t an audience that has the potential to get their fix from it. It just means that as a film, it is still a bad, if thankfully tolerable, addition to a lightweight franchise that wasn’t a mind-bender in the first place.

And that’s just disappointing.

Consensus: 1.5 Stars
But why?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Ed Skrein
Ray Stevenson
Loan Chabanol
Director Camille Delamarre
Consensus: 1.5 Stars
But why?

What to Expect

Look who's back? Not Jason Statham.

Look who’s back? Not Jason Statham.

So “the makers of The Taken Trilogy” decided to reboot the Transporter series. And Jason Statham isn’t in it. Oh, and just in case you didn’t get that this is a reboot, the rather obvious title – The Transporter Refueled – kinda says it all now, does it not?

Ah, fun times.

Let’s, however, get back to what really makes this movie so interestingly polarizing in expectation more than anything else. Now, while Statham shot to performative fame in Guy Ritchie films Snatch and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, it is the low-mid-budgeted The Transporter, released to the unwitting audience, that brought him the actual success he holds right now. Of course, with Louis Leterrier having taken the backseat, the series took a serious downfall in the hands of Olivier Megaton (ugh), who eventually directed the third installment of the franchise.

The continued fascination of providing solid B-Movie thrills reached the ordinary human being’s television set, when the franchise made its debut to the small screen, with Chris Vance reprising the role of Frank Martin. Now while I found this series to be moderately satisfying entertainment – even slightly commendable by its second season – it was mostly due to the rather decent action set-pieces.

Ed Skrein though.

On first look, and especially on the basis of the trailers, he doesn’t look a wee bit like the character he’s taken up to reprise. And what’s more; there’s quite apparently nothing new to see here, really.

Or is there?

What’s it About?

Frank Martin gets called on to do a job that obviously goes awry. Oh, it also involves his Dad getting kidnapped and stuff.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Look who's flaunting his moves! NOT Jason Statham!

Look who’s flaunting his moves! NOT Jason Statham!

Let me be really upfront here: when it comes to obviously lightweight, massy-mainstream action films, the least I desire is for action to be strongly choreographed and shot, and the lead character to be a competent and convincing presence in both performance and conviction while diving into the set-pieces. And despite having some really dumb plot points, the first two installments of the franchise clicked on a very definite basis of the action, and Statham’s undeniably smooth performance of Martin (let’s pretend forget the third one completely). And this is where the problem begins.

Ed Skrein is not Frank Martin. Pokerface does not a Frank Martin make. But that’s only a part of the problem. The real problem here (and this is solely keeping the problem of even desiring a reboot aside) is Camille Delamarre’s direction. You can’t be surprised though, really, if you look at his film credits. Having been an editor prior for Transporter 3 and Taken 2 (sigh), Delamarre made the eventual decision to shift to direction with Brick Mansions, an adaptation of EuropaCorp’s own French-language B-Movie glee-fest Banlieue 13 (which also spawned an equally entertaining sequel, but that’s another story).

And those who have seen it will agree that Brick Mansions is a terrible, redundant and unnecessary English-language remake that did not need to exist. Ever.

Now, I’m not directly judging his credibility, but let’s be honest; he hasn’t really been a part of anything relatively decent since he’s been around in the more mainstream side of the film business. Relatively, this might be his best work yet, but that doesn’t really do much when looked at solely as a film. The array of writers have written what’s possibly the most basic plot, with extremely predictable character arcs to support it. There’s a basic, suave protagonist, a basic support-system (or sidekick as you may) in the form of his Dad, and some basic femme fatales. Oh, did I forget the evil-guy-is-evil antagonist?

Here’s the twist though: directors have a large hand at executing a plot on visual ground, howsoever generic. They help the team achieve the vision everyone has of the final product, and push the performers to bring a level of relatable emotion within them. Delamarre instead focusses only on the cool for almost the whole film. And while the film oozes a lot of style, and some very decently choreographed action set-pieces, it’s how flat and generic it all feels throughout the film’s runtime. You don’t care about Frank Martin, you don’t care about the three mysterious women running the conflict and you certainly don’t give a rat’s rear-end about the antagonist. What you do care about, as a tiny respite in this otherwise mostly lifeless film, is where will this plot eventually go; this, despite the eventual predictability of it all.

The fact that the movie was made on a tight budget is very visible, especially during the action set-pieces, when most of the close-up impact shots are captured using different cameras the usual. This is especially noticeable to the discerning eye when you’re able to suddenly catch the striking absence of color and pixel information almost immediately. This is something I’ve been noticing as a trend quite often now. What the makers really have to pay for this (admittedly cost-efficient) move is the ultimate shoddiness and visual inconsistency of the said set-pieces. Not that the makers mind, because there don’t seem to be any complaints on this superficially minuscule problem from the target audience.

It doesn’t automatically turn it into a non-issue though.

The music bills in well with the film’s theme. Production design gives the film a very slick, sans-residue feel. Film editing by Julien Rey is thankfully less choppy then Delamarre’s edit decisions himself. Compared to her last film Lucy however, Rey still has to be supervised by Delamarre (if I’m not wrong), and the action, shot on multiple-cameras with multiple takes, is still filled with some weirdly unfathomable dissatisfaction, especially vaguely centered around continuity. It might not be Rey’s fault entirely here.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Look who's being badass! You guessed it... NOT Jason Statham!

Look who’s being badass! You guessed it… NOT Jason Statham!

Ed Skrein has a pokerface and mouths a few dialogues.

Yeah.

One of the biggest problems with Ed Skrein, in all seriousness though, is not – and I repeat, not – his reprisal of a role brought to fame by Statham. Hard fact? Chris Vance is still a decent Frank Martin, despite what a more biased opinion would say, and that’s purely because even Vance has that one thing Skrein doesn’t: conviction. Should there be an eventual existence of the trilogy this was intended to be a part of, however, one can’t rubbish the possibility of his comfort-level in the role increasing a notch or two. Ray Stevenson is great fun, but ultimately wasted in a gratuitous character addition that can’t really replace François Berléand’s Inspector Tarconi, a very credible source of dry, passive-aggressive humor throughout the first trilogy (and eventually the series). Loan Chabanol is a cookie-cutter femme-fatale, and it works for most part. Radivoje Bukvić is efficient, but forgettable.

Worth it?

On the one hand, the film’s not as excruciatingly terrible as a whole lot of people think it would be. That being said, it’s still a less-than-satisfactory addition to the franchise, being ultimately consistent on how flat and generic it feels overall. With Skrein still having miles to go before he might exude some conviction on the character, the movie overall doesn’t seem to making any remarkable jumps in content or stylistic elements either. It’s just another movie in a rapidly downing franchise that the producers are desperately hanging on by the threads of.

It doesn’t mean there isn’t an audience that has the potential to get their fix from it. It just means that as a film, it is still a bad, if thankfully tolerable, addition to a lightweight franchise that wasn’t a mind-bender in the first place.

And that’s just disappointing.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Ed Skrein
Ray Stevenson
Loan Chabanol
Director Camille Delamarre
Consensus:1.5 Stars
But why?

What to Expect

So “the makers of The Taken Trilogy” decided to reboot the Transporter series. And Jason Statham isn’t in it. Oh, and just in case you didn’t get that this is a reboot, the rather obvious title – The Transporter Refueled – kinda says it all now, does it not?

Ah, fun times.

Let’s, however, get back to what really makes this movie so interestingly polarizing in expectation more than anything else. Now, while Statham shot to performative fame in Guy Ritchie films Snatch and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, it is the low-mid-budgeted The Transporter, released to the unwitting audience, that brought him the actual success he holds right now. Of course, with Louis Leterrier having taken the backseat, the series took a serious downfall in the hands of Olivier Megaton (ugh), who eventually directed the third installment of the franchise.

The continued fascination of providing solid B-Movie thrills reached the ordinary human being’s television set, when the franchise made its debut to the small screen, with Chris Vance reprising the role of Frank Martin. Now while I found this series to be moderately satisfying entertainment – even slightly commendable by its second season – it was mostly due to the rather decent action set-pieces.

Ed Skrein though.

On first look, and especially on the basis of the trailers, he doesn’t look a wee bit like the character he’s taken up to reprise. And what’s more; there’s quite apparently nothing new to see here, really.

Or is there?

What’s it About?

Frank Martin gets called on to do a job that obviously goes awry. Oh, it also involves his Dad getting kidnapped and stuff.

Look who's flaunting his moves! NOT Jason Statham!

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Let me be really upfront here: when it comes to obviously lightweight, massy-mainstream action films, the least I desire is for action to be strongly choreographed and shot, and the lead character to be a competent and convincing presence in both performance and conviction while diving into the set-pieces. And despite having some really dumb plot points, the first two installments of the franchise clicked on a very definite basis of the action, and Statham’s undeniably smooth performance of Martin (let’s pretend forget the third one completely). And this is where the problem begins.

Ed Skrein is not Frank Martin. Pokerface does not a Frank Martin make. But that’s only a part of the problem. The real problem here (and this is solely keeping the problem of even desiring a reboot aside) is Camille Delamarre’s direction. You can’t be surprised though, really, if you look at his film credits. Having been an editor prior for Transporter 3 and Taken 2 (sigh), Delamarre made the eventual decision to shift to direction with Brick Mansions, an adaptation of EuropaCorp’s own French-language B-Movie glee-fest Banlieue 13 (which also spawned an equally entertaining sequel, but that’s another story).

And those who have seen it will agree that Brick Mansions is a terrible, redundant and unnecessary English-language remake that did not need to exist. Ever.

Now, I’m not directly judging his credibility, but let’s be honest; he hasn’t really been a part of anything relatively decent since he’s been around in the more mainstream side of the film business. Relatively, this might be his best work yet, but that doesn’t really do much when looked at solely as a film. The array of writers have written what’s possibly the most basic plot, with extremely predictable character arcs to support it. There’s a basic, suave protagonist, a basic support-system (or sidekick as you may) in the form of his Dad, and some basic femme fatales. Oh, did I forget the evil-guy-is-evil antagonist?

Here’s the twist though: directors have a large hand at executing a plot on visual ground, howsoever generic. They help the team achieve the vision everyone has of the final product, and push the performers to bring a level of relatable emotion within them. Delamarre instead focusses only on the cool for almost the whole film. And while the film oozes a lot of style, and some very decently choreographed action set-pieces, it’s how flat and generic it all feels throughout the film’s runtime. You don’t care about Frank Martin, you don’t care about the three mysterious women running the conflict and you certainly don’t give a rat’s rear-end about the antagonist. What you do care about, as a tiny respite in this otherwise mostly lifeless film, is where will this plot eventually go; this, despite the eventual predictability of it all.

The fact that the movie was made on a tight budget is very visible, especially during the action set-pieces, when most of the close-up impact shots are captured using different cameras the usual. This is especially noticeable to the discerning eye when you’re able to suddenly catch the striking absence of color and pixel information almost immediately. This is something I’ve been noticing as a trend quite often now. What the makers really have to pay for this (admittedly cost-efficient) move is the ultimate shoddiness and visual inconsistency of the said set-pieces. Not that the makers mind, because there don’t seem to be any complaints on this superficially minuscule problem from the target audience.

It doesn’t automatically turn it into a non-issue though.

The music bills in well with the film’s theme. Production design gives the film a very slick, sans-residue feel. Film editing by Julien Rey is thankfully less choppy then Delamarre’s edit decisions himself. Compared to her last film Lucy however, Rey still has to be supervised by Delamarre (if I’m not wrong), and the action, shot on multiple-cameras with multiple takes, is still filled with some weirdly unfathomable dissatisfaction, especially vaguely centered around continuity. It might not be Rey’s fault entirely here.

Look who's being badass! You guessed it... NOT Jason Statham!

To Perform or Not to Perform

Ed Skrein has a pokerface and mouths a few dialogues.

Yeah.

One of the biggest problems with Ed Skrein, in all seriousness though, is not – and I repeat, not – his reprisal of a role brought to fame by Statham. Hard fact? Chris Vance is still a decent Frank Martin, despite what a more biased opinion would say, and that’s purely because even Vance has that one thing Skrein doesn’t: conviction. Should there be an eventual existence of the trilogy this was intended to be a part of, however, one can’t rubbish the possibility of his comfort-level in the role increasing a notch or two. Ray Stevenson is great fun, but ultimately wasted in a gratuitous character addition that can’t really replace François Berléand’s Inspector Tarconi, a very credible source of dry, passive-aggressive humor throughout the first trilogy (and eventually the series). Loan Chabanol is a cookie-cutter femme-fatale, and it works for most part. Radivoje Bukvić is efficient, but forgettable.

Worth it?

On the one hand, the film’s not as excruciatingly terrible as a whole lot of people think it would be. That being said, it’s still a less-than-satisfactory addition to the franchise, being ultimately consistent on how flat and generic it feels overall. With Skrein still having miles to go before he might exude some conviction on the character, the movie overall doesn’t seem to making any remarkable jumps in content or stylistic elements either. It’s just another movie in a rapidly downing franchise that the producers are desperately hanging on by the threads of.

It doesn’t mean there isn’t an audience that has the potential to get their fix from it. It just means that as a film, it is still a bad, if thankfully tolerable, addition to a lightweight franchise that wasn’t a mind-bender in the first place.

And that’s just disappointing.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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