The Visit

Pay this one a visit!


Movie title here

  • Pay this one a visit!

The Visit

  • Pay this one a visit!


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Olivia DeJonge
Ed Oxenbould
Deanna Dunagan
Peter McRobbie
Kathryn Hahn

Written by

M. Night Shyamalan

Directed by

M. Night Shyamalan



coming up

What to Expect

M. Night Shyamalan’s career is a very interesting case study and could be the topic for a detailed article about what the audience wants to see and what the critics expect; though most of the times there is certainly a mismatch between the two. After he burst on the scene rather dramatically with The Sixth Sense, he followed up with Unbreakable (which I personally like a lot) and The Signs, both of which were both critical and commercial successes. Thereafter, there seems to have developed a fork between those two parameters for his films. His next release The Village began what would be a downward slope of critical appreciation, hitting an all time low with The Last Airbender. Surprisingly enough, all of his films (except Lady In The Water) have been major money spinners, including The Last Airbender, which has been called the rather extreme “Worst Film Ever Made”. Most of the critics wrote off Shyamalan after his last release After Earth, starring the father son duo of Will and Jaden Smith, which, not surprisingly, again almost made a 100% return on the investment made, also sparking a debate of whether Shyamalan bashing was the favorite theme for a lot of critics. He has been called the proverbial one-trick pony who relies too much on his ‘twist endings’, one who focuses more on direction than screenwriting, and one who has clearly come to the end of his once very promising career. Not unexpectedly, towards the end as many called it, Shyamalan does what he does best; he provides a twist, and it’s called The Visit.

What’s it About?

Two teenage kids are sent off by their mother to her estranged parents to spend a weekend as some sort of reconciliation after years of separation. Once with them, the kids soon realize that something is eerily wrong with the elderly couple and with each passing day their chances of getting out safely is decreasing.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

PETER MCROBBIE stars as Pop Pop in Universal Pictures’ The Visit.

Hey y’all! How’d you like getting cut up by me with an axe?

To say that you get humor when you were expecting a fright and jump in your seat when you were expecting a joke is the best way I can describe the wicked yet throughly entertaining and engaging experience The Visit provides. You know you are watching a horror film and hence you expect a loud bang or a eerie face thrown at you and the anticipation of it all is throughout the film. If, however, it still catches you by surprise, then that’s what makes a film in this genre click with the audience. The credit goes to the smart writing by M. Night Shyamalan; he never lets the proceedings get too dry and introduces cheeky humor; enough to make you break into a goofy grin, but not overdoing it to let you get over the mood of the film. The set up, like his previous movies, is Pennsylvania, but that is immaterial, as the real set up is an isolated house with a barn and with some distance from civilization. Shyamalan strips the set up and scenario down to the basics and doesn’t let anything disturb the setting. He doesn’t attempt to add another angle for multitude in the narrative or for any hidden meaning or signs. This is a return to the basics and all for good measures and effect.

The film is presented as footage shot by the kids and put together as a film later, who seem to know their way around a digital camera; this format has been done to death, made famous notably by The Blair Witch Project and given a wide reach by Paranormal Activity. Despite that, due to the usage of two cameras, one by each one of them, the movie gets better visuals and we don’t rely only on our imagination and actually get to see, what many a times we wished we could in similar situations in similar movies. This format also works as a two-fold advantage for Shyamalan. Namely, it first saves him the cost of a background score and, second, it heightens the anticipation of the unexpected. In some scenes when we are looking through the younger of the two kids’ camera, him being less proficient doesn’t quite get the frame right and leaves a large part staring at the empty surroundings which is enough to let you keep staring at the empty space lest a surprise jumps out. The result? You’re never settled.

To Perform or Not to Perform

OLIVIA DEJONGE stars as Rebecca in Universal Pictures’ The Visit.

So I’m shooting myself getting shit scared! Am I framing this right?

A big plus in the film is the casting of the relatively lesser known Olivia DeJonge as Rebecca Jamison and Ed Oxenbould as Tyler Jamison as the sister-brother duo in peril, which works wonderfully well and is completely in sync with exactly what scares the living daylights out of the audiences in this genre. DeJonge is effective as the older sister scarred by her father’s departure without a proper good-bye, and who has emotional issues of her own. Kathryn Hahn as the mother Paula Jamison doesn’t get much to do and is well placed in her role as the apologetic mother with many regrets. The grandfather or the Pop Pop played by the familiar Peter McRobbie is kind and menacing in equal turns and is just what you would expect from an actor of his calibre. Tony Award winning thespian Deanna Dunagan, one of the rare actresses who did a role better on the stage than what Meryl Streep did in August Osage County’s film adaptation, whips up a nasty act as Nana or the grandmother, and it’s impossible to imagine what that benevolent face and quiet demeanor can turn to when the crazies are turned on. But the star of the show is the kid Oxenbould. As Tyler Jamison he is funny; often slightly irreverent, scared and yet bumbling with nervous energy. He is a discovery who single-handedly makes the goofy funnier and the scary a bit scarier. He is the reason why this is a horror-comedy and not just horror, and I mean that in the best way possible.

Worth it?

The Visit marks the return of M. Night Shyamalan to form and is consistent, engaging and entertaining. It is the kind of horror that keeps you engrossed in the cinemas but won’t come back to haunt you after you switch off the lights. This is good popcorn entertainment and certainly worth your time, money and effort. Do pay this one a visit; it comes recommended enough!

Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

PG-13

Starring

Olivia DeJonge
Ed Oxenbould
Deanna Dunagan
Peter McRobbie
Kathryn Hahn

Written by

M. Night Shyamalan

Directed by

M. Night Shyamalan



What to Expect

M. Night Shyamalan’s career is a very interesting case study and could be the topic for a detailed article about what the audience wants to see and what the critics expect; though most of the times there is certainly a mismatch between the two. After he burst on the scene rather dramatically with The Sixth Sense, he followed up with Unbreakable (which I personally like a lot) and The Signs, both of which were both critical and commercial successes. Thereafter, there seems to have developed a fork between those two parameters for his films. His next release The Village began what would be a downward slope of critical appreciation, hitting an all time low with The Last Airbender. Surprisingly enough, all of his films (except Lady In The Water) have been major money spinners, including The Last Airbender, which has been called the rather extreme “Worst Film Ever Made”. Most of the critics wrote off Shyamalan after his last release After Earth, starring the father son duo of Will and Jaden Smith, which, not surprisingly, again almost made a 100% return on the investment made, also sparking a debate of whether Shyamalan bashing was the favorite theme for a lot of critics. He has been called the proverbial one-trick pony who relies too much on his ‘twist endings’, one who focuses more on direction than screenwriting, and one who has clearly come to the end of his once very promising career. Not unexpectedly, towards the end as many called it, Shyamalan does what he does best; he provides a twist, and it’s called The Visit.

What’s it About?

Two teenage kids are sent off by their mother to her estranged parents to spend a weekend as some sort of reconciliation after years of separation. Once with them, the kids soon realize that something is eerily wrong with the elderly couple and with each passing day their chances of getting out safely is decreasing.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

PETER MCROBBIE stars as Pop Pop in Universal Pictures’ The Visit.

Hey y’all! How’d you like getting cut up by me with an axe?

To say that you get humor when you were expecting a fright and jump in your seat when you were expecting a joke is the best way I can describe the wicked yet throughly entertaining and engaging experience The Visit provides. You know you are watching a horror film and hence you expect a loud bang or a eerie face thrown at you and the anticipation of it all is throughout the film. If, however, it still catches you by surprise, then that’s what makes a film in this genre click with the audience. The credit goes to the smart writing by M. Night Shyamalan; he never lets the proceedings get too dry and introduces cheeky humor; enough to make you break into a goofy grin, but not overdoing it to let you get over the mood of the film. The set up, like his previous movies, is Pennsylvania, but that is immaterial, as the real set up is an isolated house with a barn and with some distance from civilization. Shyamalan strips the set up and scenario down to the basics and doesn’t let anything disturb the setting. He doesn’t attempt to add another angle for multitude in the narrative or for any hidden meaning or signs. This is a return to the basics and all for good measures and effect.

The film is presented as footage shot by the kids and put together as a film later, who seem to know their way around a digital camera; this format has been done to death, made famous notably by The Blair Witch Project and given a wide reach by Paranormal Activity. Despite that, due to the usage of two cameras, one by each one of them, the movie gets better visuals and we don’t rely only on our imagination and actually get to see, what many a times we wished we could in similar situations in similar movies. This format also works as a two-fold advantage for Shyamalan. Namely, it first saves him the cost of a background score and, second, it heightens the anticipation of the unexpected. In some scenes when we are looking through the younger of the two kids’ camera, him being less proficient doesn’t quite get the frame right and leaves a large part staring at the empty surroundings which is enough to let you keep staring at the empty space lest a surprise jumps out. The result? You’re never settled.

To Perform or Not to Perform

OLIVIA DEJONGE stars as Rebecca in Universal Pictures’ The Visit.

So I’m shooting myself getting shit scared! Am I framing this right?

A big plus in the film is the casting of the relatively lesser known Olivia DeJonge as Rebecca Jamison and Ed Oxenbould as Tyler Jamison as the sister-brother duo in peril, which works wonderfully well and is completely in sync with exactly what scares the living daylights out of the audiences in this genre. DeJonge is effective as the older sister scarred by her father’s departure without a proper good-bye, and who has emotional issues of her own. Kathryn Hahn as the mother Paula Jamison doesn’t get much to do and is well placed in her role as the apologetic mother with many regrets. The grandfather or the Pop Pop played by the familiar Peter McRobbie is kind and menacing in equal turns and is just what you would expect from an actor of his calibre. Tony Award winning thespian Deanna Dunagan, one of the rare actresses who did a role better on the stage than what Meryl Streep did in August Osage County’s film adaptation, whips up a nasty act as Nana or the grandmother, and it’s impossible to imagine what that benevolent face and quiet demeanor can turn to when the crazies are turned on. But the star of the show is the kid Oxenbould. As Tyler Jamison he is funny; often slightly irreverent, scared and yet bumbling with nervous energy. He is a discovery who single-handedly makes the goofy funnier and the scary a bit scarier. He is the reason why this is a horror-comedy and not just horror, and I mean that in the best way possible.

Worth it?

The Visit marks the return of M. Night Shyamalan to form and is consistent, engaging and entertaining. It is the kind of horror that keeps you engrossed in the cinemas but won’t come back to haunt you after you switch off the lights. This is good popcorn entertainment and certainly worth your time, money and effort. Do pay this one a visit; it comes recommended enough!

Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!
About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Olivia DeJonge
Ed Oxenbould
Deanna Dunagan
Director M. Night Shyamalan
Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!

What to Expect

Grandma's rules!

Grandma’s rules!

M. Night Shyamalan’s career is a very interesting case study and could be the topic for a detailed article about what the audience wants to see and what the critics expect; though most of the times there is certainly a mismatch between the two. After he burst on the scene rather dramatically with The Sixth Sense, he followed up with Unbreakable (which I personally like a lot) and The Signs, both of which were both critical and commercial successes. Thereafter, there seems to have developed a fork between those two parameters for his films. His next release The Village began what would be a downward slope of critical appreciation, hitting an all time low with The Last Airbender. Surprisingly enough, all of his films (except Lady In The Water) have been major money spinners, including The Last Airbender, which has been called the rather extreme “Worst Film Ever Made”. Most of the critics wrote off Shyamalan after his last release After Earth, starring the father son duo of Will and Jaden Smith, which, not surprisingly, again almost made a 100% return on the investment made, also sparking a debate of whether Shyamalan bashing was the favorite theme for a lot of critics. He has been called the proverbial one-trick pony who relies too much on his ‘twist endings’, one who focuses more on direction than screenwriting, and one who has clearly come to the end of his once very promising career. Not unexpectedly, towards the end as many called it, Shyamalan does what he does best; he provides a twist, and it’s called The Visit.

What’s it About?

Two teenage kids are sent off by their mother to her estranged parents to spend a weekend as some sort of reconciliation after years of separation. Once with them, the kids soon realize that something is eerily wrong with the elderly couple and with each passing day their chances of getting out safely is decreasing.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

PETER MCROBBIE stars as Pop Pop in Universal Pictures’ The Visit.

Hey y’all! How’d you like getting cut up by me with an axe?

To say that you get humor when you were expecting a fright and jump in your seat when you were expecting a joke is the best way I can describe the wicked yet throughly entertaining and engaging experience The Visit provides. You know you are watching a horror film and hence you expect a loud bang or a eerie face thrown at you and the anticipation of it all is throughout the film. If, however, it still catches you by surprise, then that’s what makes a film in this genre click with the audience. The credit goes to the smart writing by M. Night Shyamalan; he never lets the proceedings get too dry and introduces cheeky humor; enough to make you break into a goofy grin, but not overdoing it to let you get over the mood of the film. The set up, like his previous movies, is Pennsylvania, but that is immaterial, as the real set up is an isolated house with a barn and with some distance from civilization. Shyamalan strips the set up and scenario down to the basics and doesn’t let anything disturb the setting. He doesn’t attempt to add another angle for multitude in the narrative or for any hidden meaning or signs. This is a return to the basics and all for good measures and effect.

The film is presented as footage shot by the kids and put together as a film later, who seem to know their way around a digital camera; this format has been done to death, made famous notably by The Blair Witch Project and given a wide reach by Paranormal Activity. Despite that, due to the usage of two cameras, one by each one of them, the movie gets better visuals and we don’t rely only on our imagination and actually get to see, what many a times we wished we could in similar situations in similar movies. This format also works as a two-fold advantage for Shyamalan. Namely, it first saves him the cost of a background score and, second, it heightens the anticipation of the unexpected. In some scenes when we are looking through the younger of the two kids’ camera, him being less proficient doesn’t quite get the frame right and leaves a large part staring at the empty surroundings which is enough to let you keep staring at the empty space lest a surprise jumps out. The result? You’re never settled.

To Perform or Not to Perform

OLIVIA DEJONGE stars as Rebecca in Universal Pictures’ The Visit.

So I’m shooting myself getting shit scared! Am I framing this right?

A big plus in the film is the casting of the relatively lesser known Olivia DeJonge as Rebecca Jamison and Ed Oxenbould as Tyler Jamison as the sister-brother duo in peril, which works wonderfully well and is completely in sync with exactly what scares the living daylights out of the audiences in this genre. DeJonge is effective as the older sister scarred by her father’s departure without a proper good-bye, and who has emotional issues of her own. Kathryn Hahn as the mother Paula Jamison doesn’t get much to do and is well placed in her role as the apologetic mother with many regrets. The grandfather or the Pop Pop played by the familiar Peter McRobbie is kind and menacing in equal turns and is just what you would expect from an actor of his calibre. Tony Award winning thespian Deanna Dunagan, one of the rare actresses who did a role better on the stage than what Meryl Streep did in August Osage County’s film adaptation, whips up a nasty act as Nana or the grandmother, and it’s impossible to imagine what that benevolent face and quiet demeanor can turn to when the crazies are turned on. But the star of the show is the kid Oxenbould. As Tyler Jamison he is funny; often slightly irreverent, scared and yet bumbling with nervous energy. He is a discovery who single-handedly makes the goofy funnier and the scary a bit scarier. He is the reason why this is a horror-comedy and not just horror, and I mean that in the best way possible.

Worth it?

The Visit marks the return of M. Night Shyamalan to form and is consistent, engaging and entertaining. It is the kind of horror that keeps you engrossed in the cinemas but won’t come back to haunt you after you switch off the lights. This is good popcorn entertainment and certainly worth your time, money and effort. Do pay this one a visit; it comes recommended enough!

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Olivia DeJonge
Ed Oxenbould
Deanna Dunagan
Director M. Night Shyamalan
Consensus: 3.5 Stars
A-Okay!

What to Expect

M. Night Shyamalan’s career is a very interesting case study and could be the topic for a detailed article about what the audience wants to see and what the critics expect; though most of the times there is certainly a mismatch between the two. After he burst on the scene rather dramatically with The Sixth Sense, he followed up with Unbreakable (which I personally like a lot) and The Signs, both of which were both critical and commercial successes. Thereafter, there seems to have developed a fork between those two parameters for his films. His next release The Village began what would be a downward slope of critical appreciation, hitting an all time low with The Last Airbender. Surprisingly enough, all of his films (except Lady In The Water) have been major money spinners, including The Last Airbender, which has been called the rather extreme “Worst Film Ever Made”. Most of the critics wrote off Shyamalan after his last release After Earth, starring the father son duo of Will and Jaden Smith, which, not surprisingly, again almost made a 100% return on the investment made, also sparking a debate of whether Shyamalan bashing was the favorite theme for a lot of critics. He has been called the proverbial one-trick pony who relies too much on his ‘twist endings’, one who focuses more on direction than screenwriting, and one who has clearly come to the end of his once very promising career. Not unexpectedly, towards the end as many called it, Shyamalan does what he does best; he provides a twist, and it’s called The Visit.

What’s it About?

Two teenage kids are sent off by their mother to her estranged parents to spend a weekend as some sort of reconciliation after years of separation. Once with them, the kids soon realize that something is eerily wrong with the elderly couple and with each passing day their chances of getting out safely is decreasing.

Hey y'all! How'd you like getting cut up by me with an axe?

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

To say that you get humor when you were expecting a fright and jump in your seat when you were expecting a joke is the best way I can describe the wicked yet throughly entertaining and engaging experience The Visit provides. You know you are watching a horror film and hence you expect a loud bang or a eerie face thrown at you and the anticipation of it all is throughout the film. If, however, it still catches you by surprise, then that’s what makes a film in this genre click with the audience. The credit goes to the smart writing by M. Night Shyamalan; he never lets the proceedings get too dry and introduces cheeky humor; enough to make you break into a goofy grin, but not overdoing it to let you get over the mood of the film. The set up, like his previous movies, is Pennsylvania, but that is immaterial, as the real set up is an isolated house with a barn and with some distance from civilization. Shyamalan strips the set up and scenario down to the basics and doesn’t let anything disturb the setting. He doesn’t attempt to add another angle for multitude in the narrative or for any hidden meaning or signs. This is a return to the basics and all for good measures and effect.

The film is presented as footage shot by the kids and put together as a film later, who seem to know their way around a digital camera; this format has been done to death, made famous notably by The Blair Witch Project and given a wide reach by Paranormal Activity. Despite that, due to the usage of two cameras, one by each one of them, the movie gets better visuals and we don’t rely only on our imagination and actually get to see, what many a times we wished we could in similar situations in similar movies. This format also works as a two-fold advantage for Shyamalan. Namely, it first saves him the cost of a background score and, second, it heightens the anticipation of the unexpected. In some scenes when we are looking through the younger of the two kids’ camera, him being less proficient doesn’t quite get the frame right and leaves a large part staring at the empty surroundings which is enough to let you keep staring at the empty space lest a surprise jumps out. The result? You’re never settled.

So I'm shooting myself getting shit scared! Am I framing this right?

To Perform or Not to Perform

A big plus in the film is the casting of the relatively lesser known Olivia DeJonge as Rebecca Jamison and Ed Oxenbould as Tyler Jamison as the sister-brother duo in peril, which works wonderfully well and is completely in sync with exactly what scares the living daylights out of the audiences in this genre. DeJonge is effective as the older sister scarred by her father’s departure without a proper good-bye, and who has emotional issues of her own. Kathryn Hahn as the mother Paula Jamison doesn’t get much to do and is well placed in her role as the apologetic mother with many regrets. The grandfather or the Pop Pop played by the familiar Peter McRobbie is kind and menacing in equal turns and is just what you would expect from an actor of his calibre. Tony Award winning thespian Deanna Dunagan, one of the rare actresses who did a role better on the stage than what Meryl Streep did in August Osage County’s film adaptation, whips up a nasty act as Nana or the grandmother, and it’s impossible to imagine what that benevolent face and quiet demeanor can turn to when the crazies are turned on. But the star of the show is the kid Oxenbould. As Tyler Jamison he is funny; often slightly irreverent, scared and yet bumbling with nervous energy. He is a discovery who single-handedly makes the goofy funnier and the scary a bit scarier. He is the reason why this is a horror-comedy and not just horror, and I mean that in the best way possible.

Worth it?

The Visit marks the return of M. Night Shyamalan to form and is consistent, engaging and entertaining. It is the kind of horror that keeps you engrossed in the cinemas but won’t come back to haunt you after you switch off the lights. This is good popcorn entertainment and certainly worth your time, money and effort. Do pay this one a visit; it comes recommended enough!

About the Author

Sajan Gupta

Reluctant banker. Aspirational writer. Movie enthusiast. Voracious reader. Part-time ambitious; full-time dreamer. Runs the "Reel Life" page on Facebook.

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