Triple 9

Takers of The Town in this Heat


Triple 9

  • Takers of The Town in this Heat

Triple 9

  • Takers of The Town in this Heat


Rated

R

Starring

Chiwetel Ejiofor
Kate Winslet
Casey Affleck
Aaron Paul
Anthony Mackie

Written by

Matt Cook

Directed by

John Hillcoat



What to Expect

The biggest challenge of an action film would be to balance the thrill of a perfect action set-piece with fervent narrative movement. And if one must be frank, Triple 9’s story doesn’t necessarily boast of a unique set of plot devices. Additionally, from what little we know, potential viewers have just another cops-and-robbers story at hand.

But we’re talking about John Hillcoat here. The Australian director is the man behind such commendable end-products as Lawless and his adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, among others. And should that not be enough, a surprisingly strong cast supports the film— there’s Kate Winslet, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Aaron Paul, Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck and what have you. Surely something like this cannot easily be dismissed, can it?

What’s it About?

The lines between cops and robbers get progressively blurred as the latter perform one of their riskiest heists ever.

And that’s all anyone just about needs to know about the movie.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Moral ambiguity

Moral ambiguity

Triple 9 needs its audience to know absolutely nothing about the film before it—not the tone, the narrative, or its characters. All it wants its viewers to do is to hop on a seat, fasten their seatbelts and enjoy the ride. That alone, however, doesn’t necessarily make the experience an entirely different one. The film, being old-school in its placement of plot devices, ends up including some conventional ones, at best. Debutant writer Matt Cook’s original screenplay does borrow a gracious lot, piecing it together with the help of your (un)friendly neighborhood Russian mob, ethnic gang-run locales, corruption in the force et al. Throw in a dash of The Town and a bit of Takers, and lo and behold! You’ve got yourself a movie.

(As the audience headed out of the cinema, I was discussing the movie with Kurt, an acquaintance of mine. We touched upon its apparent similarities to the plotlines of other films, and I began my quip: “This is what Takers would look like if it were a better movie-”

“-and with a better cast,” Kurt completed my sentence.

“Bingo!”)

How Cook uses these devices, however, is what makes it count. He’s not the star of the show, though; the movie is Hillcoat’s all the way. His execution of the material is tense, and—at many times—unpredictable. Kate Winslet’s Russian mob boss Irina, as an example, may not uniquely justify doing what she does, but her borderline sociopathic tendencies make her a fascinating character right till the end of her screen timeline. Her lack of behaving like a classic antagonist may give many enough fodder for an argument against her character arc, but if we manage to analyze her motives, won’t someone who’s a borderline sociopath avoid the long-used sneer-and-glare? An individual like Irina would find the performance of such activities extremely normal—she doesn’t exactly have a conscience, remember?

Borderline sociopathy

Borderline sociopathy

The classic conscience rests on the shoulders of (most of) the morally flexible cops, and one would wish it weren’t so. Sure, it classifies the good and evil within people in the universes of their respective films clearly, but it doesn’t exactly make them any fascinating, or human, for that matter. Humans work on reflexes, and adding a conscience to those that don’t need it creates a forced inner conflict we don’t need. Here, Hillcoat saves Cook’s utilization of some slightly dated screenwriting technique by converting the characters into living, breathing people with vices and virtues in equal measure. There’s a balance—and if one were to notice it, appreciation for how the film has shaped up would be immense.

Now this is an action movie, and so every action set-piece needs to be worth it. The great news is, it totally is. There’s a consistently tense pace every set-piece abides by—be it a chase on lanes filled with traffic, or on foot, hot-on-heels of possible suspects—and the editor understands that completely. Dylan Tichenor (who funnily also edited The Town, another heist film running on similar lines) tightens the in and out points of the two consecutive shots when needed, without as much as letting the new trend of hyperkinetic cutting spoil the show. He knows where to linger, and where to press his metaphorical foot hard on the accelerator; that works just fine for the movie. Atticus Ross’ music and some very sharp cinematography Nicolas Karakatsanis only help bump up the brownie points on the cinematic technique of the film.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Target of Treachery

Target of Treachery

To ignore the performances, however, would be a sin. While Woody Harrelson doesn’t do much away from the kind of character type that fits him like a glove, it’s Casey Affleck who gives his all to the newly transferred cop he plays. Teresa ”Discount-Kristen-Stewart” Palmer (or wait, is it the other way round?) is alright, but the accent she puts on feels studied and obvious. Anthony Mackie is pitch perfect, Chiwetel Ejiofor is sharp, and Norman Reedus does whatsoever he can within the short amount of time the screenplay gives him. Aaron Paul nails his character, but one would have appreciated his role to have been slightly more well-rounded. Gal Gadot exists, but it’s Kate Winslet who delivers a powerhouse performance. The faux warmth in her conversations realize her icy demeanor, and for Winslet to have nailed the exact emotion is commendable. Oh and there’s that accent. Very nonintrusive, might I add!

Worth it?

Is this the best screenplay ever? Not really. But is this a solid action film? Definitely. Filled with a fascinatingly built universe, interesting character arcs and an insanely unpredictable amount of narrative twists and turns, Triple 9 makes use of a rather odd McGuffin (the Triple 9—999, if you may—is a callout within the US for nearby units to rush to the location of an officer down) and spins a serviceable plot around it. And to be honest, it does manage to keep viewers invested enough in the proceedings of its story. It’s quite unfortunate thus that, considering the news of its creation’s up in the air since as long as 2010, the age of this screenplay shows in many places. Not that it makes the end-product any less gripping enough—oh you’re going to be holding your breaths alright—but one will wonder what would the film look like had it realized its full potential.

Oh well.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us


Rated

R

Starring

Chiwetel Ejiofor
Kate Winslet
Casey Affleck
Aaron Paul
Anthony Mackie

Written by

Matt Cook

Directed by

John Hillcoat



What to Expect

The biggest challenge of an action film would be to balance the thrill of a perfect action set-piece with fervent narrative movement. And if one must be frank, Triple 9’s story doesn’t necessarily boast of a unique set of plot devices. Additionally, from what little we know, potential viewers have just another cops-and-robbers story at hand.

But we’re talking about John Hillcoat here. The Australian director is the man behind such commendable end-products as Lawless and his adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, among others. And should that not be enough, a surprisingly strong cast supports the film— there’s Kate Winslet, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Aaron Paul, Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck and what have you. Surely something like this cannot easily be dismissed, can it?

What’s it About?

The lines between cops and robbers get progressively blurred as the latter perform one of their riskiest heists ever.

And that’s all anyone just about needs to know about the movie.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Moral ambiguity

Moral ambiguity

Triple 9 needs its audience to know absolutely nothing about the film before it—not the tone, the narrative, or its characters. All it wants its viewers to do is to hop on a seat, fasten their seatbelts and enjoy the ride. That alone, however, doesn’t necessarily make the experience an entirely different one. The film, being old-school in its placement of plot devices, ends up including some conventional ones, at best. Debutant writer Matt Cook’s original screenplay does borrow a gracious lot, piecing it together with the help of your (un)friendly neighborhood Russian mob, ethnic gang-run locales, corruption in the force et al. Throw in a dash of The Town and a bit of Takers, and lo and behold! You’ve got yourself a movie.

(As the audience headed out of the cinema, I was discussing the movie with Kurt, an acquaintance of mine. We touched upon its apparent similarities to the plotlines of other films, and I began my quip: “This is what Takers would look like if it were a better movie-”

“-and with a better cast,” Kurt completed my sentence.

“Bingo!”)

How Cook uses these devices, however, is what makes it count. He’s not the star of the show, though; the movie is Hillcoat’s all the way. His execution of the material is tense, and—at many times—unpredictable. Kate Winslet’s Russian mob boss Irina, as an example, may not uniquely justify doing what she does, but her borderline sociopathic tendencies make her a fascinating character right till the end of her screen timeline. Her lack of behaving like a classic antagonist may give many enough fodder for an argument against her character arc, but if we manage to analyze her motives, won’t someone who’s a borderline sociopath avoid the long-used sneer-and-glare? An individual like Irina would find the performance of such activities extremely normal—she doesn’t exactly have a conscience, remember?

Borderline sociopathy

Borderline sociopathy

The classic conscience rests on the shoulders of (most of) the morally flexible cops, and one would wish it weren’t so. Sure, it classifies the good and evil within people in the universes of their respective films clearly, but it doesn’t exactly make them any fascinating, or human, for that matter. Humans work on reflexes, and adding a conscience to those that don’t need it creates a forced inner conflict we don’t need. Here, Hillcoat saves Cook’s utilization of some slightly dated screenwriting technique by converting the characters into living, breathing people with vices and virtues in equal measure. There’s a balance—and if one were to notice it, appreciation for how the film has shaped up would be immense.

Now this is an action movie, and so every action set-piece needs to be worth it. The great news is, it totally is. There’s a consistently tense pace every set-piece abides by—be it a chase on lanes filled with traffic, or on foot, hot-on-heels of possible suspects—and the editor understands that completely. Dylan Tichenor (who funnily also edited The Town, another heist film running on similar lines) tightens the in and out points of the two consecutive shots when needed, without as much as letting the new trend of hyperkinetic cutting spoil the show. He knows where to linger, and where to press his metaphorical foot hard on the accelerator; that works just fine for the movie. Atticus Ross’ music and some very sharp cinematography Nicolas Karakatsanis only help bump up the brownie points on the cinematic technique of the film.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Target of Treachery

Target of Treachery

To ignore the performances, however, would be a sin. While Woody Harrelson doesn’t do much away from the kind of character type that fits him like a glove, it’s Casey Affleck who gives his all to the newly transferred cop he plays. Teresa ”Discount-Kristen-Stewart” Palmer (or wait, is it the other way round?) is alright, but the accent she puts on feels studied and obvious. Anthony Mackie is pitch perfect, Chiwetel Ejiofor is sharp, and Norman Reedus does whatsoever he can within the short amount of time the screenplay gives him. Aaron Paul nails his character, but one would have appreciated his role to have been slightly more well-rounded. Gal Gadot exists, but it’s Kate Winslet who delivers a powerhouse performance. The faux warmth in her conversations realize her icy demeanor, and for Winslet to have nailed the exact emotion is commendable. Oh and there’s that accent. Very nonintrusive, might I add!

Worth it?

Is this the best screenplay ever? Not really. But is this a solid action film? Definitely. Filled with a fascinatingly built universe, interesting character arcs and an insanely unpredictable amount of narrative twists and turns, Triple 9 makes use of a rather odd McGuffin (the Triple 9—999, if you may—is a callout within the US for nearby units to rush to the location of an officer down) and spins a serviceable plot around it. And to be honest, it does manage to keep viewers invested enough in the proceedings of its story. It’s quite unfortunate thus that, considering the news of its creation’s up in the air since as long as 2010, the age of this screenplay shows in many places. Not that it makes the end-product any less gripping enough—oh you’re going to be holding your breaths alright—but one will wonder what would the film look like had it realized its full potential.

Oh well.

Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?
About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Watch the trailer

We’re viral

Like UsFollow Us

Cast Chiwetel Ejiofor
Kate Winslet
Casey Affleck
Director John Hillcoat
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

Red is the color of Bloodshed

Red is the color of Bloodshed

The biggest challenge of an action film would be to balance the thrill of a perfect action set-piece with fervent narrative movement. And if one must be frank, Triple 9’s story doesn’t necessarily boast of a unique set of plot devices. Additionally, from what little we know, potential viewers have just another cops-and-robbers story at hand.

But we’re talking about John Hillcoat here. The Australian director is the man behind such commendable end-products as Lawless and his adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, among others. And should that not be enough, a surprisingly strong cast supports the film— there’s Kate Winslet, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Aaron Paul, Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck and what have you. Surely something like this cannot easily be dismissed, can it?

What’s it About?

The lines between cops and robbers get progressively blurred as the latter perform one of their riskiest heists ever.

And that’s all anyone just about needs to know about the movie.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Moral ambiguity

Moral ambiguity

Triple 9 needs its audience to know absolutely nothing about the film before it—not the tone, the narrative, or its characters. All it wants its viewers to do is to hop on a seat, fasten their seatbelts and enjoy the ride. That alone, however, doesn’t necessarily make the experience an entirely different one. The film, being old-school in its placement of plot devices, ends up including some conventional ones, at best. Debutant writer Matt Cook’s original screenplay does borrow a gracious lot, piecing it together with the help of your (un)friendly neighborhood Russian mob, ethnic gang-run locales, corruption in the force et al. Throw in a dash of The Town and a bit of Takers, and lo and behold! You’ve got yourself a movie.

(As the audience headed out of the cinema, I was discussing the movie with Kurt, an acquaintance of mine. We touched upon its apparent similarities to the plotlines of other films, and I began my quip: “This is what Takers would look like if it were a better movie-”

“-and with a better cast,” Kurt completed my sentence.

“Bingo!”)

How Cook uses these devices, however, is what makes it count. He’s not the star of the show, though; the movie is Hillcoat’s all the way. His execution of the material is tense, and—at many times—unpredictable. Kate Winslet’s Russian mob boss Irina, as an example, may not uniquely justify doing what she does, but her borderline sociopathic tendencies make her a fascinating character right till the end of her screen timeline. Her lack of behaving like a classic antagonist may give many enough fodder for an argument against her character arc, but if we manage to analyze her motives, won’t someone who’s a borderline sociopath avoid the long-used sneer-and-glare? An individual like Irina would find the performance of such activities extremely normal—she doesn’t exactly have a conscience, remember?

Borderline sociopathy

Borderline sociopathy

The classic conscience rests on the shoulders of (most of) the morally flexible cops, and one would wish it weren’t so. Sure, it classifies the good and evil within people in the universes of their respective films clearly, but it doesn’t exactly make them any fascinating, or human, for that matter. Humans work on reflexes, and adding a conscience to those that don’t need it creates a forced inner conflict we don’t need. Here, Hillcoat saves Cook’s utilization of some slightly dated screenwriting technique by converting the characters into living, breathing people with vices and virtues in equal measure. There’s a balance—and if one were to notice it, appreciation for how the film has shaped up would be immense.

Now this is an action movie, and so every action set-piece needs to be worth it. The great news is, it totally is. There’s a consistently tense pace every set-piece abides by—be it a chase on lanes filled with traffic, or on foot, hot-on-heels of possible suspects—and the editor understands that completely. Dylan Tichenor (who funnily also edited The Town, another heist film running on similar lines) tightens the in and out points of the two consecutive shots when needed, without as much as letting the new trend of hyperkinetic cutting spoil the show. He knows where to linger, and where to press his metaphorical foot hard on the accelerator; that works just fine for the movie. Atticus Ross’ music and some very sharp cinematography Nicolas Karakatsanis only help bump up the brownie points on the cinematic technique of the film.

To Perform or Not to Perform

Target of Treachery

Target of Treachery

To ignore the performances, however, would be a sin. While Woody Harrelson doesn’t do much away from the kind of character type that fits him like a glove, it’s Casey Affleck who gives his all to the newly transferred cop he plays. Teresa ”Discount-Kristen-Stewart” Palmer (or wait, is it the other way round?) is alright, but the accent she puts on feels studied and obvious. Anthony Mackie is pitch perfect, Chiwetel Ejiofor is sharp, and Norman Reedus does whatsoever he can within the short amount of time the screenplay gives him. Aaron Paul nails his character, but one would have appreciated his role to have been slightly more well-rounded. Gal Gadot exists, but it’s Kate Winslet who delivers a powerhouse performance. The faux warmth in her conversations realize her icy demeanor, and for Winslet to have nailed the exact emotion is commendable. Oh and there’s that accent. Very nonintrusive, might I add!

Worth it?

Is this the best screenplay ever? Not really. But is this a solid action film? Definitely. Filled with a fascinatingly built universe, interesting character arcs and an insanely unpredictable amount of narrative twists and turns, Triple 9 makes use of a rather odd McGuffin (the Triple 9—999, if you may—is a callout within the US for nearby units to rush to the location of an officer down) and spins a serviceable plot around it. And to be honest, it does manage to keep viewers invested enough in the proceedings of its story. It’s quite unfortunate thus that, considering the news of its creation’s up in the air since as long as 2010, the age of this screenplay shows in many places. Not that it makes the end-product any less gripping enough—oh you’re going to be holding your breaths alright—but one will wonder what would the film look like had it realized its full potential.

Oh well.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

We’re viral

Like usFollow us
Cast Chiwetel Ejiofor
Kate Winslet
Casey Affleck
Director John Hillcoat
Consensus: 3 Stars
Not bad, ain't that?

What to Expect

The biggest challenge of an action film would be to balance the thrill of a perfect action set-piece with fervent narrative movement. And if one must be frank, Triple 9’s story doesn’t necessarily boast of a unique set of plot devices. Additionally, from what little we know, potential viewers have just another cops-and-robbers story at hand.

But we’re talking about John Hillcoat here. The Australian director is the man behind such commendable end-products as Lawless and his adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, among others. And should that not be enough, a surprisingly strong cast supports the film— there’s Kate Winslet, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Aaron Paul, Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck and what have you. Surely something like this cannot easily be dismissed, can it?

What’s it About?

The lines between cops and robbers get progressively blurred as the latter perform one of their riskiest heists ever.

And that’s all anyone just about needs to know about the movie.

Moral ambiguity

Triple 9 needs its audience to know absolutely nothing about the film before it—not the tone, the narrative, or its characters. All it wants its viewers to do is to hop on a seat, fasten their seatbelts and enjoy the ride. That alone, however, doesn’t necessarily make the experience an entirely different one. The film, being old-school in its placement of plot devices, ends up including some conventional ones, at best. Debutant writer Matt Cook’s original screenplay does borrow a gracious lot, piecing it together with the help of your (un)friendly neighborhood Russian mob, ethnic gang-run locales, corruption in the force et al. Throw in a dash of The Town and a bit of Takers, and lo and behold! You’ve got yourself a movie.

(As the audience headed out of the cinema, I was discussing the movie with Kurt, an acquaintance of mine. We touched upon its apparent similarities to the plotlines of other films, and I began my quip: “This is what Takers would look like if it were a better movie-”

“-and with a better cast,” Kurt completed my sentence.

“Bingo!”)

How Cook uses these devices, however, is what makes it count. He’s not the star of the show, though; the movie is Hillcoat’s all the way. His execution of the material is tense, and—at many times—unpredictable. Kate Winslet’s Russian mob boss Irina, as an example, may not uniquely justify doing what she does, but her borderline sociopathic tendencies make her a fascinating character right till the end of her screen timeline. Her lack of behaving like a classic antagonist may give many enough fodder for an argument against her character arc, but if we manage to analyze her motives, won’t someone who’s a borderline sociopath avoid the long-used sneer-and-glare? An individual like Irina would find the performance of such activities extremely normal—she doesn’t exactly have a conscience, remember?

Borderline sociopathy

The classic conscience rests on the shoulders of (most of) the morally flexible cops, and one would wish it weren’t so. Sure, it classifies the good and evil within people in the universes of their respective films clearly, but it doesn’t exactly make them any fascinating, or human, for that matter. Humans work on reflexes, and adding a conscience to those that don’t need it creates a forced inner conflict we don’t need. Here, Hillcoat saves Cook’s utilization of some slightly dated screenwriting technique by converting the characters into living, breathing people with vices and virtues in equal measure. There’s a balance—and if one were to notice it, appreciation for how the film has shaped up would be immense.

Now this is an action movie, and so every action set-piece needs to be worth it. The great news is, it totally is. There’s a consistently tense pace every set-piece abides by—be it a chase on lanes filled with traffic, or on foot, hot-on-heels of possible suspects—and the editor understands that completely. Dylan Tichenor (who funnily also edited The Town, another heist film running on similar lines) tightens the in and out points of the two consecutive shots when needed, without as much as letting the new trend of hyperkinetic cutting spoil the show. He knows where to linger, and where to press his metaphorical foot hard on the accelerator; that works just fine for the movie. Atticus Ross’ music and some very sharp cinematography Nicolas Karakatsanis only help bump up the brownie points on the cinematic technique of the film.

Target of treacheryThe mastermind and his matchThe mastermind and his matchThe mastermind and his matchThe mastermind and his match

To Perform or Not to Perform

To ignore the performances, however, would be a sin. While Woody Harrelson doesn’t do much away from the kind of character type that fits him like a glove, it’s Casey Affleck who gives his all to the newly transferred cop he plays. Teresa ”Discount-Kristen-Stewart” Palmer (or wait, is it the other way round?) is alright, but the accent she puts on feels studied and obvious. Anthony Mackie is pitch perfect, Chiwetel Ejiofor is sharp, and Norman Reedus does whatsoever he can within the short amount of time the screenplay gives him. Aaron Paul nails his character, but one would have appreciated his role to have been slightly more well-rounded. Gal Gadot exists, but it’s Kate Winslet who delivers a powerhouse performance. The faux warmth in her conversations realize her icy demeanor, and for Winslet to have nailed the exact emotion is commendable. Oh and there’s that accent. Very nonintrusive, might I add!

Worth it?

Is this the best screenplay ever? Not really. But is this a solid action film? Definitely. Filled with a fascinatingly built universe, interesting character arcs and an insanely unpredictable amount of narrative twists and turns, Triple 9 makes use of a rather odd McGuffin (the Triple 9—999, if you may—is a callout within the US for nearby units to rush to the location of an officer down) and spins a serviceable plot around it. And to be honest, it does manage to keep viewers invested enough in the proceedings of its story. It’s quite unfortunate thus that, considering the news of its creation’s up in the air since as long as 2010, the age of this screenplay shows in many places. Not that it makes the end-product any less gripping enough—oh you’re going to be holding your breaths alright—but one will wonder what would the film look like had it realized its full potential.

Oh well.

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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