WONDER WOMAN

Wonder Woman takes us to Themyscira, an island populated exclusively by women. Their almost idyllic existence is changed, however, when its princess Diana witnesses a plane crash-land into the sea.

With the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) moving from strength to strength critically and commercially—while the DC Extended Universe (DCEU) stumbles to appear consistent to its audience, of course—any goodwill the world of the Dark Knight and the Red Cape currently has left seems to quickly deteriorate.

It’s precisely the reason Wonder Woman, directed by Patty Jenkins (Monster), is looked up to as a potential savior of the DCEU, what with Jenkins’s expertise at play, and Gal Gadot’s previous appearance as the eponymous protagonist boasting massive potential. Then again, the last time viewers were pumped about a solid director helming a comic book adaptation within the very universe, their reward—Suicide Squad—would morph quickly into a rather harsh punishment of sorts.

Badassery never looked this good

Thankfully—and in almost astonishing fashion—Wonder Woman manages to wow the hell out of its audience. Its world isn’t pigeonholed in the plot and shoved down viewers’ throats—its touch is light, and its subtlety welcoming. As the franchise goes, however, it patiently moves into the surreal (a decision that might incite vociferously divisive arguments) one step at a time. As superhero origin stories go, this isn’t as exceedingly different in plot as any other. What drives it miles apart from them, however, is its attention-to-detail and the eventual directions its narrative takes viewers to.

Wonder Woman’s biggest trump card is the effortless political and social subtext it underlines within its dynamic graph. Penned by Zack Snyder (Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice) in collaboration with Allan Heinberg (television’s The Catch) and Jason Fuchs (Pan), the film’s plot romances many genres—sword-and-sandal movie, historical thriller, moody character piece, and deliciously kitschy action fantasy—bending genres with the very agility and conviction of the eponymous protagonist herself when engaged in battle.

Wonder Woman is a film that thinks utopian within the confines of a chaotic political society that unsurprisingly prefers destruction over community.ANKIT OJHA

And what an absolute blast each battle is.

As the eponymous protagonist, Gal Gadot (Fast & Furious 6) is phenomenal. With a magnetic screen presence, fluid agility, and confidence enough to rule the world, Gadot completely owns it, and blazes through the celluloid with electrifying precision. Moving toe-to-toe with her charisma is Chris Pine (Star Trek Beyond), the yang to her yin. Jenkins, Snyder and the writers seem vehement enough to ensure that while Diana Prince is an empowering, mostly feminist character—a fish out of water in a world dominated by males—she isn’t averse to feeling love and the requisition of support.

It is this balance between characters that makes this such a fascinating film. Diana and Trevor both need each other, and aren’t ashamed of admitting it. As powerful as she is, she uses the support of her male peers to get to her destination, while they gradually begin to feel less uncomfortable depending on her. Wonder Woman is a film that thinks utopian within the confines of a chaotic political society that unsurprisingly prefers destruction over community.

Dat group photo tho
Wonder Woman—the DC cinematic trinity’s third form post the massively underrated Man of Steel and Dawn of Justice—boasts beautifully handled political and social subtext, and stellar turns from Gadot and Pine. Patty Jenkins, take a bow for your Monster sophomore cinematic effort. We couldn’t be more grateful for this genre-bending breath of fresh air in the summer blockbuster space.

Watch the trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

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Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

Star Rating:

Cast

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PG-13

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Cast Gal Gadot
Chris Pine
Robin Wright
Director Patty Jenkins
Star Rating
Wonder Woman takes us to Themyscira, an island populated exclusively by women. Their almost idyllic existence is changed, however, when its princess Diana witnesses a plane crash-land into the sea.

With the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) moving from strength to strength critically and commercially—while the DC Extended Universe (DCEU) stumbles to appear consistent to its audience, of course—any goodwill the world of the Dark Knight and the Red Cape currently has left seems to quickly deteriorate.

It’s precisely the reason Wonder Woman, directed by Patty Jenkins (Monster), is looked up to as a potential savior of the DCEU, what with Jenkins’s expertise at play, and Gal Gadot’s previous appearance as the eponymous protagonist boasting massive potential. Then again, the last time viewers were pumped about a solid director helming a comic book adaptation within the very universe, their reward—Suicide Squad—would morph quickly into a rather harsh punishment of sorts.

Badassery never looked this good

Thankfully—and in almost astonishing fashion—Wonder Woman manages to wow the hell out of its audience. Its world isn’t pigeonholed in the plot and shoved down viewers’ throats—its touch is light, and its subtlety welcoming. As the franchise goes, however, it patiently moves into the surreal (a decision that might incite vociferously divisive arguments) one step at a time. As superhero origin stories go, this isn’t as exceedingly different in plot as any other. What drives it miles apart from them, however, is its attention-to-detail and the eventual directions its narrative takes viewers to.

Wonder Woman’s biggest trump card is the effortless political and social subtext it underlines within its dynamic graph. Penned by Zack Snyder (Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice) in collaboration with Allan Heinberg (television’s The Catch) and Jason Fuchs (Pan), the film’s plot romances many genres—sword-and-sandal movie, historical thriller, moody character piece, and deliciously kitschy action fantasy—bending genres with the very agility and conviction of the eponymous protagonist herself when engaged in battle.

Wonder Woman is a film that thinks utopian within the confines of a chaotic political society that unsurprisingly prefers destruction over community.ANKIT OJHA

And what an absolute blast each battle is.

As the eponymous protagonist, Gal Gadot (Fast & Furious 6) is phenomenal. With a magnetic screen presence, fluid agility, and confidence enough to rule the world, Gadot completely owns it, and blazes through the celluloid with electrifying precision. Moving toe-to-toe with her charisma is Chris Pine (Star Trek Beyond), the yang to her yin. Jenkins, Snyder and the writers seem vehement enough to ensure that while Diana Prince is an empowering, mostly feminist character—a fish out of water in a world dominated by males—she isn’t averse to feeling love and the requisition of support.

It is this balance between characters that makes this such a fascinating film. Diana and Trevor both need each other, and aren’t ashamed of admitting it. As powerful as she is, she uses the support of her male peers to get to her destination, while they gradually begin to feel less uncomfortable depending on her. Wonder Woman is a film that thinks utopian within the confines of a chaotic political society that unsurprisingly prefers destruction over community.

Dat group photo tho
Wonder Woman—the DC cinematic trinity’s third form post the massively underrated Man of Steel and Dawn of Justice—boasts beautifully handled political and social subtext, and stellar turns from Gadot and Pine. Patty Jenkins, take a bow for your Monster sophomore cinematic effort. We couldn’t be more grateful for this genre-bending breath of fresh air in the summer blockbuster space.

Watch trailer here:

About the Author

Ankit Ojha

Facebook

Ambivert. Intermittent cynic. Content creator. New media enthusiast. Binge-watcher. Budding filmmaker.

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